1996+ HARLEY DAVIDSON FLH INNER AND OUTTER FAIRING MOUNT FOR HONDA VTX 1300 installation

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 09-04-2012

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This mount was made to attach the HD FLH assembled fairing to the 4 fork mounting points on the VTX 1300 using the Memphis Shades mounts. This allows use of the MS allen wrench to quickly remove the fairing if needed. You will have to make or buy a headlight extension. Has to be done first. I used a 5″ x 5″ x .5″ piece of aluminum stock and made one to bump the headlight out 4″. There will be some trimming and relocating of brackets. And you’ll have to buy longer bolts to mount everything correctly. Get the headlight squared away first, then do the fairing. Take a length of 1″ aluminum angle stock and cut two 17″ pieces from it. These will be the uprights for the “H” brace. Measure 5.5″ from the bottom of one piece and center punch for a hole. Drill a large enough hole to slip over the MS mounting hardware on the forks. Start at about ½” bit and notch out as necessary. Center of this hole has to be 5.5″ from the absolute bottom of the angle iron. In the same location, drill out another notch for the bottom mounting point. A drill press is handy for these modifications and you can hog out the mounting notches with a file, dremmel, etc., until they fit. Do the same for the other length of 1″ angle stock but make sure it is a mirror image of the first one. Test fit these by mounting them to the MS fork brackets using the MS bracket hardware. Bottom notch goes in first, then the top notch. I epoxied the back “nuts” of the mounting hardware to the fork mounting brackets. It keeps it in place when you’re taking the fairing on and off the bike. On the top mounting points, I epoxied a washer with one side ground flat to the bolt’s mounting ferule. This allowed better contact between the H brace and the fork mounting bracket. Didn’t want that fairing falling off. Adjust as necessary and after the test fit, remove.

Motorcycle Security System INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 04-04-2012

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The transceiver is pre-charged at the factory and will operate out of the box but we recommend that it be charge for at least 10 hours when first operated to insure full life of battery. 1. Plug in provided charger into the transceiver. 2. While the transceiver is charging the red status LED will flash twice every two seconds. 3. When transceiver is fully charged no LED will flash. 4. Recharge the transceiver every day to maintain full function. Receiver Status LED Panel The status LED panel provides information about the status of the receiver, memory and the battery level. Receiver on / Memory Trigger Blue LED will flash Receiver on / Low Battery Red LED will flash. Receiver On White LED will flash Range LED Range LED indicates when the transceiver is still with in receiving range of the system. In Range Green LED will flash Out Of range Red LED will flash Operating the transceiver The following instruction assumes that the transceiver is with in range of the motorcycle. Arming Press the #1 button, the siren will chirp 3 times. The transceiver will chirp twice and the white status LED will continuously flash to confirm that the receiver is on. The range LED light will then flash green . System is armed.

BULLET & MINI-BULLET TACHOMETERS INSTALLATION MANUALS

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 22-02-2012

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UNDER THE HANDLEBAR MOUNTING A: Can the Tach be mounted inverted under the handlebars? A: Yes, if you have enough room to mount under the handlebars for the tach to mount and still be able to turn from lock to lock without hitting the tank or dash. See note in next paragraph for details on how to rotate the face of the Tach for appropriate positioning. BE AWARE: Chances of water intrusion are increased in this position! FACE ROTATION Q: How do I rotate the face of the Tach? A: With the Tach housing removed from the handlebar, unscrew the bezel (counterclockwise) and remove it from the housing, using a 5/32 Allen wrench loosen the the set-screw located inside the clamp area or at the rear of the clamp area. Rotate the face of the Tach to your preferred position, tighten the set screw and replace the bezel. COIL IDENTIFICATION Q: How can I tell positive from negative on my coil? A: Most motorcycles will have two wires going to each of the coils, and each coil will share one common-color wire and have one unique color wire. The common-color is the positive and the unique color is the negative. For example, a Yamaha set-up has a red/black on both coils – that is positive. The other coil wire would be orange or gray – that is the negative side. Hondas set-up is blue/yellow and yellow/blue for the negative, and black/white for the positive. Suzuki has orange/white on both coils as positive and has white or black/yellow as the negative side. COIL SELECION Q: My bike has two (or four) coils – Which one/ones do I use? A: Most multi-cylinder bikes have one coil per cylinder. You only need to connect to one of the coils – choose the one most convenient for wire routing. (Single-fire motorcycles require the Tach adapter we include with each assemble

UNIVERSAL HEAT DEMONS INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 17-02-2012

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A. Open or remove the seat according to the service-manual instructions. !!! Warning !!! Warning To protect against shock and accidental start-up of the vehicle, disconnect the battery cables, negative cable first, before proceeding. Inadequate safety precautions could result in death or serious injury. !!! Warning !!! Warning Always disconnect the negative battery cable first. If the positive battery cable should contact ground with the negative cable installed, the resulting sparks may cause a battery explosion which could result in death or serious injury. B. Disconnect the battery, negative cable first, according to the service-manual instructions. There are two options for installing the Heat Demons. Option A is doing the installation without removing the handlebar and Option B includes the removal of the handlebar. Two holes need to be drilled in the handlebar and the Option chosen depends on how comfortable the installer is on drilling holes in the bar. One advantage for removing the handlebar is the Right Handlebar Control can be left intact during the installation. The disadvantage is on some models the headlight and trim pieces need to also be removed along with the cables that are attached to the handlebar. Option A – Installation without removing the handlebar. The 4 level Controller can be mounted on the left or right side of the handlebar so choose the side and location that will provide the easiest installation and most convenient operation. The width between the holes will allow the Controller to be mounted directly to the clutch bracket or brake reservoir on many Yamaha, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki or Triumph motorcycles. On other motorcycles the back side clamp and cap screws are provided to mount the Controller to the handlebar

Motorcycle Safety & Licensing Start Seeing Motorcycles

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 10-02-2012

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What All Drivers Should Know • Assume a motorcycle is closer than it looks. Motorcycles look further away than they are and seem to move slower than they really do. • Allow more following distance. Keep three to four seconds behind a motorcycle. Motorcyclists often slow down without using the brakes, thus not activating the brake light. • Make sure the turn signal is for real. Motorcycle turn signals are usually not self-canceling. • Use extra caution with passengers. A passenger complicates a motorcyclist’s task. Balance is more diffi cult. Stopping distance is increased. • Don’t crowd them. Maneuverability is one of a motorcycle’s better characteristics, but only at slower speeds with good road conditions. They can’t always dodge out of the way. Motorcycle Traffi c Laws Motorcyclists have the same rights and the same responsibilities as other drivers in Nevada. There are also some special conditions: • Motorcyclists must wear helmets in Nevada. • Motorcyclists have the right to use a complete traf- fi c lane. Two motorcycles may share a lane if the operators both agree to do so. • Motorcyclists may not pass or ride next to another vehicle in the same travel lane. • Motorcycles may not be driven between vehicles in adjacent lanes even if the vehicles are stopped. Police offi cers are an exception. (NRS Chapter 486) Gonna Ride? Take a Course – Get the License Riding a motorcycle is an enjoyable and challenging pastime. The best thing you can do for your safety and your family is to take a rider education course and get a Class M driver license

Brakes, Wheel Assemblies, and Tires tips

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 09-02-2012

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BRAKING SYSTEMS The braking systems used on motorcycles and ATVs, like virtually any type of braking system, reduce the machine’skineticenergyby transforming it into heat energy known as friction heat . Therefore, a brake is an energy-conversion device that converts the energy of motion (kinetic energy) into heat energy. Motorcycle braking is accomplished by the friction (resistance to movement) produced when a brake lining is forced against a rotating drum or disc. Friction between the linings and drum or disc serve to slow and eventually stop wheel rotation. The brakes used on motorcycles fall into two categories: Mechanical drum, sometimes called expanding shoe Hydraulic disc Motorcycle brakes commonly use either hydraulic (fluid pressure) or mechanical (cable or linkage) mechanisms to apply the brakes. Brakes, Wheel Assemblies, and Tires 1 Mechanical Drum Brakes First, let’slookatthedrum brake, sometimes called the mechanical, expanding double-shoe brake ( Figure 1 ). Generally used for rear wheels, this brake is also used on some front wheels. With this kind of brake, a backing plate that’sconnectedtothe forks holds the two brake shoes. The wheel and brake drum rotate around the brake shoes. When the rider applies the brake, a cam pushes the two semicircular shoes outward. The circle formed by the two shoes expands. When the shoes expand, they press against the rotating drum, thereby limiting its free rotation

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A Comparison of Stopping Distance Performance for Motorcycles Equipped with ABS, CBS and Conventional Hydraulic Brake Systems

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 09-02-2012

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Surface Tests On the ABS-equipped motorcycles, the operator was tasked with braking sufficiently to assure the operation of the ABS. The measured stopping distance values were corrected to compare data from the speeds of 48 km/h and 128 km/h, except for the BMW F650 data, which was corrected to 48 km/h and 117 km/h, the latter figure limited by that model’s top speed of 157 km/h (i.e. 75% of 157 km/h). In the ABS-enabled mode, for each load/speed/brake combination, the stopping distances were very consistent from one run to another. In this mode, the braking force was applied in a controlled and consistent manner by the ABS mechanism. With the exception of having to react to the possibility of the rear wheel becoming airborne under high deceleration, the rider did not require significant experience or special skill in order to achieve a high level of performance. In the ABS-disabled mode, the stopping distances were less consistent because the rider while modulating the brake force, had to deal with many additional variables at the same time. Up to six runs were allowed for the rider to become familiar with the motorcycle’s behavior and to obtain the best stopping distance. Test results from non-ABS motorcycles were noticeably more sensitive to rider performance variability. The data in Table 2 include the best stopping distances obtained without ABS, compared to the average braking performance obtained with ABS. The average results were favored for presenting the performance with ABS because the best results could be more representative of threshold braking, whereby the ABS operated for only a portion of the entire test. Despite being compared to the best stopping distances without ABS, the average results with ABS provided an overall reduction in stopping distance of 5%. The stopping distance reduction was more significant when the motorcycle was loaded (averaging 7%). The greatest stopping distance reduction (averaging 17%) was observed when only the rear foot pedal was applied to stop the motorcycle from 128 km/h

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Dellorto Motorcycle Carburetor Tuning Guide and INSTALLATION

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 04-02-2012

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Installation angles The tapered-needle-type Carburetor s with concentric, central float chambers have a horizontal main barrel and can be mounted up to a maximum inclination of 40 degrees from the horizontal (figure 3) . For
applications on motocross and trials engines, etc, this inclination should be 30 degrees or less. fig. 3 2.4 Engine connections The Carburetor is usually connected to the engine with one of the following : Male clamp fixing : the male clamp connection used for the flexible fixing of the Carburetor to the engine is usually recommended on motorcycles for motocross, trials, etc or fitted to engines which run to high rpm or those which produce strong vibrations. fig. 4 Female clamp : the female clip connection and the flange connection, with a rigid fitting to the engine, are usable on road motorcycles or fitted to engines which do not generate very strong vibrations

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Dellorto Motorcycle Carburetor Tuning Guide INSTALLATION

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 01-02-2012

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The main Carburetor functions are: • To form a proper homogeneous inflammable mixture of fuel and air • To supply the engine with varying amounts of this mixture The fuel-air mixture is formed through vapourising and by uniformly spraying fuel into the airstream or at least by atomising it into very small droplets. Atomization takes place in this way: liquid fuel from the atomiser nozzle meets the flow of air which carries it, broken into very fine droplets, to the combustion chamber. We have spoken of a “proper” mixture because the mixture strength, defined as the amount of air in weight mixed with a fuel unit of weight, must have a precise value, ie it must be within the limits of inflammability so that the mixture can be easily ignited by the spark in the combustion chamber. lnflammmability limits for commercial petrol are: 7: 1 (rich limit ie. 7 kgs of air and 1 kg of petrol) , down to 20: 1 (lean limit ie. 20 kgs of air and 1 kg of petrol) . To obtain optimum combustion between these inflammability limits, a value very close to the so- called stoiciometric value is needed ie. about 14.5 – 15.0 kgs of air to 1 kg of petrol. A stoiciometric mixture ratio is one which ensures complete combustion of fuel with only the formation of water and carbon dioxide. The stoiciometric mixture ratio depends on the kind of fuel used, so if the fuel is changed, this fuel- air ratio will also change (see SECTION 5.1 ) .

Installation & Tuning Instructions For all Motorcycle Applications

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 02-01-2012

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1) Start with a cold motorcycle, and remove the seat (see owners manual for seat removal instructions). 2) Locate a suitable place for your new PowerCard: It is generally velcroed or zip tied under the seat or behind cowling, check for the easiest mounting and wire routing. Often it is easier to place the card in the desired location, and then pull wires from there, rather than connecting the wires and trying to work the PowerCard backward. (In a 2004 Yamaha R6 for example, it is easiest to mount the card, then route connectors one by one through to the engine compartment.) 3) Disconnect the battery ground. Battery may need to be removed to aid in installation (2006 Yamaha R1 for example). 4) Remove the fuel tank and necessary cowlings – many tanks can simply be rotated up and away to allow access to the fuel injector connectors. Secure the tank. Be careful to prevent fuel spills if fuel line removal is necessary – use the quick-disconnect fittings if your motorcycle is so equipped. (see owners manual for tank removal instructions) a. Note: ZX10 installation also requires removal of the stock air box. Unbolt, disconnect fittings, and then turn clock-wise one-quarter turn to remove. Distributed Exclusively by Moss Motors, Ltd.
3 PowerCard®Instructions Injector lead #3 improperly installed (+) 2 1 (-) 4 3 Distributed Exclusively by Moss Motors, Ltd. 5) Connecting the PowerCard harness inline: a. Remove any one factory fuel injector connector from an injector (a flat blade screwdriver or long nose pliers may be used to ease removal). b. Couple the female connector from the PowerCard onto the fuel injector, and plug the male connector into the ECU/factory wiring harness. c. Repeat for the rest of the fuel injector connectors – The order is not important as long as they are installed as they are paired (in and out)