79 honda cb650 accelerator pump adjustment

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YAMAHA Road Star Fuel Pump Relocation Kit INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 08-11-2010

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1. Remove seat and disconnect battery. Remove fuel tank along with both left and right side battery covers, and remove air box from carburetor (all per Yamaha standard shop manual procedures). 2. Remove chrome plastic cover over fuel pump and disconnect choke cable/knob from lower pump bracket. Remove pump-to-carb fuel line from fuel pump. Disconnect fuel pumps electrical lead connector. 3. Remove two (2) hex-head pump mounting bracket bolts and remove pump assembly from motorcycle. Slide fuel pump up and off bracket mounting posts (Caution: excess fuel may drain from pump and/or fuel lines and fuel filter!). Remove heat shield. Remove remaining fuel line from pump. Pull all fuel lines from filter and remove steel springs and hose clamps from these lines (these will be reused on the kits fuel lines). With a sharp knife or box cutter, trim off the top portion of the fuel pumps rubber isolation/mount system per Photo A. Next cut pumps wiring harness approximately half way between connector and pump. Strip the insulation from the ends of these wires as well as from the supplied Baron harness extension wires. Using the supplied electrical butt connectors, crimp Baron harness extensions red wire to pumps black-w/blue-strip wire, and Baron harness extensions black wire to pumps black wire. Repeat this process on other side of wire harness extension with pumps connector. Now, referring to Photo B, you will need to cut off the square tube that runs along the side of the fuel pump with a hack saw. Cut down toward pump body in a straight cut, then cut tube off by cutting along the body. This will allow you to twist pump in the rubber mount so the curved spigot is facing up (clockwise approx 1/4 turn). 4. Remove pump-to-carb fuel line from carb and separate electrical wires from this line. Remove this fuel line from engine. Re-route choke cable to right side of engine (toward carb) and rotate it up and over rear cylinder head back toward left side of bike. Mount new Baron choke bracket to the choke cable and tighten plastic nut. New choke bracket will mount to rear fuel tank mounting location (Photo C). 5. 99~03 models – Remove electrical relay bracket (found under the right side cover) from the bike and slide each relay off of this bracket. Install fuel pump onto new Baron Fuel Pump Bracket and install bracket in the same location as the stock bracket you just removed, using stock mounting hardware. Refer to Photo F for proper installation. 6. 04~07 models Remove electrical relays from stock bracket and remove relays from rubber holder. Cut rubber holder per Photo E and replace one of the relays into the rubber and install on to new Baron bracket. The second relay will be placed to the right of the tool bag under the seat and secured with the provided two-sided tape pad. Reconnect plugs to the relays. (Photo F)

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How To Adjust the Accelerator Pump On the 40mm Mikuni Carburetor

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 21-01-2012

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1) The “blue” colored screw in the image is the duration adjustment screw. Underneath the head of the screw is a lock nut and the bracket arm that the screw is threaded into. To decrease the amount of fuel squirted the adjustment screw is turned “clockwise” or in. To increase the amount of fuel squirted the adjustment screw is turned “counter clockwise” or out. To get the max, amount of decrease remove the screw and take the lock nut off of the screw. Then replace the screw into the cam arm, then replace the lock nut underneath the arm on the screw. this gives you another 3/32″ of an inch in which the screw can be screwed in.
2) Turn the adjustment screw fully clockwise or IN. Start your engine, Blip your throttle open, if the engine stutters, (hesitates), it is not getting enough fuel so turn the screw counter clockwise to increase the amount of fuel squirted from the accelerator pump into the carburetor. Keep blipping the throttle and adjusting the screw till the carburetor starts to cough. Stop here and turn the screw back in till the coughing stops. Tighten down the lock nut. This should give you the best throttle response with the least amount of coughing and backfiring out the carburetor. Timing Adjustment Screw This is the “Green” colored screw just above the Blue duration adjustment screw. The” Mucker” said it best,,,,, This upper screw adjusts the “timing” of the squirt. By altering it’s setting, you can advance or delay the onset of the fuel squirt. But probably, it won’t have to be touched

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Honda CARBURETOR ADJUSTMENT TOOLS

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 17-12-2011

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K&L CARBURETOR ADJUSTMENT WRENCHES These tools use tough and accurate bevel gear actuation instead of cable for professional use. The aluminum handle includes index marks for accurate tuning. Sold each. Three types available: 35-9653 Slot-type Pilot Screw Adjustment Wrench for Kawasaki/Suzuki/Yamaha 35-9658 Slot-type Pilot Screw Adjustment Wrench with longer tip for Kawasaki/Suzuki/Yamaha 35-9650 D-type Keihin Pilot Screw Adjustment Wrench for Honda 90-DEGREE 1/4″ HEX DRIVER This gear driven, 1/4″ hex driver set is made of high-grade aluminum and stainless steel. Strongest tool of it’s type on the market. Designed for use on hard-to-reach pilot air screws on inline fours. Can be used with any 1/4″ or 6mm hex bits. 35-7820 90-Degree 1/4″ Hex Driver Set: Includes straight slot, phillips, d-shape pilot screw bit, 6mm hex jet bit & 1/4″ – hex – 1/4″ drive bit. FCR CARB TOOL Set includes three bits – 6mm hex for main jets, long reach straight slot for pilot jets and 3mm allen for float bowl removal. Longer bits make this set ideal for reaching into recessed cavities when adjusting Keihin FCR carburetors. Sold as a set. 35-7978 FCR Carb Tool 12″ DRILL BIT For removal of carburetor plug. (mixture screw plug) 1/8″ bit x 12 inch length. 35-1186 YM-33217-16 JET DRIVER 35-2270 Perfect for removal of jets from small recessed passages

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Performance Starts Here RACING CARBURETORS

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Filed Under (Mikuni) by admin on 31-10-2010

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Mikuni RS Series Radial Flat Slide carburetors represent the first ever aftermarket true high performance carbs offered to the racing public. Designated the RS for radial slide design, these carbs feature such innovations as: large 34, 36 or 38mm smoothbores, excellent throttle response and streetability, adjustable accelerator pump system, lighter more compact design, quick change needle clip, cam-lock carb synchronizing, horsepower improvement of 25% to 30% and competition priced. • Starter System: Provides fuel enrichment for cold engine starting. • Accelerator Pump Adjust Screws: Sets on and off operation of accelerator pump in relation to throttle slide position. • Adjustable Accelerator Pump: Squirts fuel into carburetor venturi when throttle is opened to improve engine response. • Idle Adjustment Screw: Controls engine idle speed. • Throttle Return Spring: A choice of positioning pegs allows adjustment of spring tension. • Genuine Mikuni Jets: Provide for precise fuel metering. • Pilot Air Jet: in conjunction with the Pilot Fuel Screw for tuning of mixture at idle to 1/4 throttle. • Float Bowl Vent: Allows atmospheric pressure into float bowl for fuel flow. • Smooth Throttle Bore/Venturi: Produces the optimum air and fuel mixture flow at all RPMs. • Jet Needle Clip: Has easy adjustment feature for quick tuning. • Accelerator Pump Spray Nozzle: Shoots fuel directly into the intake tract for immediate engine response. • Flat Throttle Valve Design: Provides the strongest signal for precise and instantaneous throttle response

1928 AJS Installation Instruction Manual

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Filed Under (AJS) by admin on 31-10-2010

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Oil delivered at “6″ goes to the big end, while that delivered at “5″ goes up to the cam box. The bottom end of the plunger also has a slot, which registers alternately with inlet ” 7 ” and outlet ” 8,” and is responsible for returning the oil from the sump to the tank. It is of greater capacity than the supply pump. To dismantle the pump, proceed as follows :— 1. Remove all pipes from the pump. 2. Remove pump from engine. 3. Remove the two nuts “A” and the pin” 3 ” from the pump. 4. Gently push the plunger out of the pump body in the direction of the arrow “C” on the drawing. To re-assemble, the reverse sequence of these operations is, of course, followed. Should it be required to remove the worm ” 2,” the brass bush ” D ” which screws into the body with a R.H. thread, must be removed first. It is of the utmost importance that the nut “A” always makes an air-tight joint with the body ; and should there be no oil returning to the tank at any time, check this joint immediately. Occasionally go over all the oil pipe unions and nuts to see that everything is tight. Should one of the unions come loose, especially on the inlet side of the pump, of course, the whole system of lubrication fails. As will be seen from the illustration, the oil pump itself is very simple. There are only two moving parts, and it is most unlikely that anything in this pump will get out of order. Should the oil not be circulating and running back to the tank, be quite sure that there is plenty of oil in the tank and that the filters are clean, before dismantling the pump. Should it be necessary to take the oil pump from the engine, make certain that the short piece of square tube which drives the pump spindle from the engine is replaced. The pump delivers oil to the big end via holes drilled down the driving side of the crank­ case, then through holes in the main shaft, up web of flywheel, and through the crank pin into the big end. Oil is also taken to the cam box. A portion of the cam box projects inside the chaincase—the end of this projection is open ; the oil from the cam box falls on to the vertical chain—from there it falls through holes in the crankcase into the sump, and is returned to the oil tank. The piston and little end of connecting rod are lubricated in the ordinary way by splash from the big end, but we have found it necessary for continued high speeds on track or in road race, above (say) 60 m.p.h. average, to take an extra supply of oil direct to the cylinder walls

HONDA 450E/ S MOUNTING AND ARS ADJUSTMENT INSTALLATION

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 24-12-2011

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MULTI-RATE SPRINGS AND THE ARS SYSTEM Depending on the application dual–rate springs are fitted on the shocks. Dual-rate springs are just that– a spring set with two separate rates. This is done with a short spring stacked on a longer spring. As both springs collapse they produce a soft, or initial, rate. The spring set will maintain this initial rate until the short spring stops compressing. At that point, the spring rate “crosses over” to the stiffer, or final, rate. This multi-rate system allows a soft initial rate for comfort on small bumps, but has the capability of soaking up the big pot-holes and other off road hazards. ARS stands for Adjustable Rate Suspension. ARS is available on some dual-rate spring 4-wheel ATV shocks. ARS differs from spring preload. The ARS system allows the rider to increase or decrease the load-carrying capacity of the shocks by turning a lever. Depending on the application and spring set, the rider can increase the load capacity of the shocks up to 50 percent. The average preloader that makes a half-inch increase in preload will HONDA 450E/S MOUNTING & ARS ADJUSTMENT INSTRUCTIONS Continued on next page. #TRX450 – 5/28/99 #TRX450 – 5/28/99 Fig. 1. Front shock installation. Note that the shock body is at the top with the shaft pointing down. ARS shown is in the unloaded position. Fig. 2. Rear shock mounting with ARS. Position the lever so that it will not come in contact with any vehicle parts around it. The cup can be rotated to reposition the lever if necessary.
increase the capacity of the shocks to only about 5 to 10 percent. ARS allows the shocks to be correct for solo riding, but still handle the increased weight of an added load. ARS can also be employed to stiffen the rates for aggressive riding. The ARS system consists of an indexing lever and a stepped cup that contains the short spring of the dual- rate. The position of the lever in relation to the steps in the cup determines how long the spring set remains on the soft, or initial, spring rate. On most ARS applications, four positions can be selected from full stiff to full soft. Indexing is done in a matter of seconds by rotating the lever or the cup by hand. Indexing the cup to the lever is usually preferable to avoid interference. Adjustment of the ARS system should only be made while the vehicle is unloaded to reduce the load on the springs. NOTE: It is important to make sure that a step in the cup is positioned directly over the tang on the lever. This will prevent damage to the cup and/or lever that can be caused by making partial contact between the tang and a step. In addition, make sure that the lever will not contact any vehicle parts around it, as the suspension moves up. TUNING TIPS—The “softest” setting on the ARS does not mean that the ride will be the most comfortable at that setting. It means that this is the softest spring setting which would be employed on smooth trails or without a load. Excessive suspension bottoming caused by rough conditions or by the addition of a large load will cause a harsh ride when the shock is adjusted to this setting. To eliminate this bottoming, adjust the ARS to the stiffer positions for a more comfortable ride. Hence, sometimes “stiffer is softer.” NITROGEN PRESSURES IN EMULSION SHOCKS

Tacoma Power Steering Pump Improving Power Steering Reservoir modification

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Filed Under (Toyota Manuals) by admin on 02-10-2011

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For my SAS I decided to add hydraulic steering assist as it comes in real handy for rock crawling. I got the Redneck Ram setup from the folks at West Texas Off-road that includes rebuilding an earlier IFS steering box along with drilling and tapping the box for the included ram. One of the down sides of adding a ram is that it slows the steering down because the stock steering pump has to supply the added volume for the hydraulic ram. Another is that it creates a fluid volume change in the system reservoir that needs to be compensated for in some way. After doing some reading on the West Texas site about how to go about modifying a Saginaw pump and reading up on earlier Toyota pump mods for steering assist setups on the Pirate board, I decided to give it whirl and see what I could do about the Tacoma pump. Chuck Gardella was kind enough to supply me with a blown pump that I could rebuild and submit to my endless fiddling and tinkering. I plan to give him my pump in return when I get this one done and installed. You need to do something to allow for more room in the reservoir for the standard hydraulic ram assist setup so I decided to tackle the reservoir first. The reason you need the extra space is because the ram is unbalanced. That is there is a rod on one side of the cylinder and not on the other side so the volume of the fluid has to change in the system to account for the volume of the rod as it travels back and forth. I calculated the volume of the rod that I have at full stroke to be about 2 oz or so. This would equate to plus or minus up to 2 oz. in the pump reservoir. Well first off, it’s no wonder why so many folks boil their steering pumps over with heavy wheeling and have so many other steering problems. The stock power steering reservoir doesn’t even rate pint sized

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CSS/ CSR Separator, Recovery Tank, Purge Valve, CYC Timer & Pump INSTALLATION & OPERATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (CSR) by admin on 27-10-2010

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1.*The*CSS/CSR*system*skid*should*be*bolted*to*a*flat*&*level*concrete*foundation*with*suitably*sized*and*quantity*of*anchor*bolts.* The entire system (1″-6″) is on a single skid. For systems 8″ and larger, the separator stands alone on its own 3 legs, while the pump/motor, recovery tank (CSR only), and control panel are on an individual skid. It is therefore incumbent upon the installer to insure*that*the*complete*package*is*bolted*to*a*flat*&*level*concrete*foundation,*to*insure*that*the*”piping*assembly”*is*installed* without any undue stress. 2. Inspect and hydrotest all pipe connections for leaks. *All*flanged*connections*must*have*gaskets,*and*all*threaded*connections*must*have*Teflon*tape*or*anti-seize*coating. 4. Flush all new pipe construction before system operation. In the absence of a pump strainer basket, use a y-strainer with 1/4″ perforated*screen.**The*perforated*screen*must*be*at*least*the*same*size*or*one*pipe*size*larger*than*the*pump*suction.**The* perforated screen will block out larger debris such as welding rods, tools, rugs, gloves, etc. ELECTRICAL 1. Voltage supply to the system must be the same as the voltage indicated on the control panel. 2. Follow the pump operating instructions prior to start-up. 3.*Turn*the*motor*”ON”*and*check*rotation.**Rotation*must*turn*in*the*same*direction*as*the*arrow*located*on*the*pump* casing. If pump is rotating in the opposite direction then reverse L1 and L2 on the incoming power to the panel. Recheck rotation. 4. Starting or in-rush current should not exceed 3 seconds, running current should be equal to or less than nameplate full load amps (FLA). 5. Thermal Overload Setting 5a. Select the Operating Voltage 5b. Multiply Motor Service Factor (SF) by the Full Load Amps (FLA) to get the Service Factor Amps (SFA). 5c. Adjust the Thermal Overload Dial to match SFA Note: Some motors come with SFA written on the nameplate. The majority of our motors come with a 1.15 service factor, but very few come with a 1.25 SF. STARTUP 1. Open system inlet valve 100% and outlet valve 50% (supplied by others). 2.*Suction*line*must*be*flooded. 3. Open separator air vent located near the outlet, (standard on 2″ and larger). 4.*Turn*the*system*”ON.” 5. Purge all the air. 6.*For*HH*&*SP*systems,*open*outlet*valve*until*the*gauge*reads*35psi.*For*LH*systems,*open*outlet*valve*until*a*100%* opening*is*achieved.**If*system*begins*to*vibrate,*then*slightly*close*separator*outlet*until*it*stabilizes

MOUNTAIN BIKE AIR SHOCK SET-UP AND TUNING GUIDE

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 01-12-2010

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DETAILED SET-UP 2. Installing Air Pressure – Remove the air cap from the Schrader valve on the end of the shock body. Attach the pump to the Schrader valve. Some people damage their pumps by screwing them on too far. As soon as the gauge registers pressure, screw 1/2 turn more and pump to the desired level. Use the release button on the pump to reduce air pressure. The hiss you hear when unscrewing the pump is only the air from the pump and not from the shock! Likewise, when you install the pump again, you will also hear a hiss as air from the shock fills the pump and reduces the registered pressure you previously installed. All perfectly normal when pressurizing the shock! After removing the pump, be sure to reinstall the Schrader valve cap. If the shock does not dampen properly after pressurizing, the air pressure may have been lost during pump removal as a result of a worn pump fitting o-ring that needs replacement. Do not ride the bike until the shock is properly pressurized. 3. Main Air Spring Pressure Adjustments – Air Spring adjustments are made by inflating or deflating the main air spring chamber. Since your IFP air pressure adjustment (outlined above) also affects your starting spring force, you should always adjust your IFP pressure before adjusting the main air spring pressure. You can refer to the online Quick Start guide at: www.progressivesuspension.com/literature.html for accurate main air spring pressure and sag settings matched to your bike model and body

HARLEY DAVIDSON PREMIUM SUSPENSION KIT REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 09-03-2011

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REMOVAL Front Fork Assembly 1. Refer to the XR model section of the service manual and remove the front forks. INSTALLATION Front Fork Assembly 1. Install front forks from kit to motorcycle according to service manual instructions but do not tighten the fork bracket pinch screws at this time. 2. See Figure 1. Measure the distance from the top of upper fork bracket to top of fork assembly. Both sides must be exactly the same and measure 0.388-0.468 inch (9.85- 11.89 mm) above the top fork bracket. Align the adjustment screws inline with the handlebars (see Figure 5). is06083a Figure 1. Fork Installation Height Measurement. NOTE If new pinch screws are not readily available, use a wire grinder wheel to remove all remaining lock patch from original pinch screws, wash screws in clean solvent and dry thoroughly. Apply two drops of LOCTITE® 262 to the first 1/4 in. (6.35 mm) of the end threads. 3. Install pinch screws to upper and lower fork brackets. 4. Verify fork tube installation measurement is 0.388-0.468 inch (9.85-11.89 mm). 5. Tighten pinch screws to 30-35 ft-lbs ( (40.7-47.5 Nm)) See Figure 2. The top edge of reflector should be 1-1/2 inches (38.10 mm) below the lower edge of the bottom fork clamp. 6. Remove the adhesive backing. Place reflector in position and press reflector firmly into place to activate the adhesive. Repeat for reflector on opposite fork. REMOVAL OEM Rear Shock Absorbers 1. Refer to the XR model section of the service manual and remove the rear shock absorbers. INSTALLATION Rear Shock Absorbers 1. See Figure 3. Install the rear shock absorbers according to service manual instructions. The shocks are installed with the external gas reservoir to the rear of the shock absorbers and the thick side of the grommet installed to the frame rail mounts. is06142 Figure 3. Install Thick Side Of Grommet To Frame Rail SUSPENSION ADJUSTMENTS Front Fork Suspension Adjustment Whenever a wheel is installed and before moving the motorcycle, pump brakes to build brake system pressure. Insufficient pressure can adversely affect brake performance, which could result in death or serious injury. (00284a) Adjust both forks equally. Improper fork adjustment can lead to loss of control, which could result in death or serious injury. (00124c) Compression and rebound adjusting valves may be damaged if too much force is used at either end of the adjustment range. (00237a) NOTES Damping is set at the factory for the average solo rider under normal riding conditions. The rider may make adjustments to compensate for individual riding styles and varying road conditions. Evaluating and changing the rebound and compression damping is a very subjective process with many variables and should be approached carefully. The front and rear preload setting will need to be adjusted for the rider’s weight and cargo. This adjustment should be made before the motorcycle is ridden any distance and after changing the overall vehicle weight (adding saddlebags, etc.). If the preload adjustment is correct, and you have the rebound and compression damping set at the factory recommended points, the motorcycle should handle and ride properly. Changes in the load carried requires changes in the preload setting(s). Carrying less weight than was used for setting up the suspension requires decreasing the amount of preload. Increasing the load carried requires adding more preload. The following tools are needed to make suspension adjust- ments. • 5 mm hex key (front fork preload adjustment tool). • Spanner wrench with extension handle (shock absorber preload adjustment). • Screw driver (front fork damping adjustment). 1. Front fork preload adjustment: a. See Figure 4 and Table 1. Using the 5 mm hex key, turn the preload adjuster counterclockwise until it stops. This is the minimum preload setting. b. Turn the preload adjuster clockwise the recommended amount specified for the rider weight

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