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MECHANIC CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS MDOS Form: Repair Facility Manual

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 18-11-2010

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Chapter 7: Mechanic Certification Requirements Page 4 7-2.2 Heavy-duty Truck Certification Categories. The Heavy-duty Truck Repair categories requiring mechanic certification to repair vehicles over 10,000 pounds G.V.W. are: a) Engine Repair, Gasoline; b) Engine Repair, Diesel; c) Drive Trains; d) Brakes and Braking Systems; e) Suspension and Steering Systems; f) Electrical Systems; g) Collision-Related Mechanical Repair. 7-2.3 Other On-road Vehicle Certification Categories. Repair categories for other on-road vehicles that require mechanic certification to perform repairs are: a) Motorcycle; b) Recreational Trailer. Automobile and Light Truck Certification Categories. The repair categories requiring mechanic certification to repair vehicles under 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight (G.V.W.) are: a) Engine Repair; b) Engine Tune-up/Performance; c) Front End, Suspension and Steering Systems; d) Brakes and Braking Systems; e) Automatic Transmission; f) Manual Transmission, Front and Rear Drive Axles; g) Electrical Systems; h) Heating and Air Conditioning; i) Collision-Related Mechanical Repair; j) Unitized Body Structural Repair; k) Pre-1973 Vehicle Repair

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Vengeance Motorcycle Specification And Owner's Manual

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Filed Under (Vengeance) by admin on 20-11-2010

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Vengeance Maxis • Vengeance Raven • Vengeance Banshee • Vengeance Whiplash • Hotrod Drifter • Hotrod CalChop • Hotrod Teacher • Hotrod Bone Shifting Gears Starting off and changing gears requires coordination of the clutch and throttle and gearshift lever. If you don’t do things right, the amount of control you have over the bike is lessened. To start off, pull in the clutch, shift into first gear, roll on the throttle a little, and ease out the clutch. You will become familiar with the friction zone (that’s where the clutch begins to take hold and move the bike), and you add a bit more throttle. You don’t want to stall the engine, nor do you want to over-rev it. There’s a sweet spot in there; find it. Shift while traveling in a straight line. Shifting in a curve is not good practice, and something to be avoided. Become familiar with the sound of your engine, so you can tell when you should shift without looking at your instruments. When you downshift to a lower gear, you should (in one swift, smooth movement) be able to squeeze the clutch, rev the engine a little to let it catch the lower gear smoothly, and shift down. When you come to a stop in traffic, leave the bike in first gear with the clutch disengaged (just in case you want to accelerate out of there in a hurry). Who knows what may be coming up behind you. Braking Don’t ever forget: The front brake on your motorcycle can supply as much as 70 percent or more of your stopping power. The single most important thing you can learn about braking is to use that front brake every single time you want to slow down. Turning When you are riding along the road, you lean a motorcycle into a turn. Learning to lean is an essential part of riding a motorcycle. It is a normal function of the bike when you are changing its path of travel – and quite different from turning the steering wheel of your car. To get the motorcycle to lean in a normal turn, press the handlebar in the direction of the turn and maintain slight pressure on that handlebar to take you smoothly through that particular turn. In other words: press right to go right; press left to go left. Your instincts to keep the motorcycle on a smooth path while keeping it from falling over usually take care of this without you even noticing it. (Demonstrate to yourself how a motorcycle moves by pressing a handlebar slightly while traveling in a straight line. The motorcycle will move in the direction of the handlebar you pushed.) • Slow down before you enter the turn; look as far ahead as possible through the turn. • Keep your feet on the pegs, and grip the gas tank with your knees. • Lean with the motorcycle; don’t try to sit perpendicular to the road while the motorcycle is leaning over. • Keep an even throttle through the turn, or even accelerate a little bit. Checking the Bike before the Ride It’s not fun to have things go wrong on a motorcycle, but if you spend a minute before you go off on a ride, you can increase the chances that nothing will.

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Ural Motorcycle Repair Manual

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Filed Under (Ural) by admin on 11-11-2010

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FLUID CAPACITIES TOURIST & -10 Models Sportsman Solo Gasoline tank 19 L / 5 Gal 19L / 5 Gal 18.5 L / 4.9 Gal Reserve 2L / 0.5 gal 2L / 0.5 gal 2L- / 0.5 Gal Engine crankcase 2 L / 2 qt. + 3.6 oz. 2.0L / 2.11 qt 2 L / 2 qt. + 3.6 oz. Gearbox 0.9L / 1 qt 0.9L / 1 qt 0.9L / 1 qt Final drive 110 ml / 3.85 oz. 150 ml / 5.25 oz. 110 ml / 3.85 oz. Telescopic Forks (-10 & solo models) N/A on Tourist N/A on Sportsman 135 ml / 4.56 oz. Shock Absorbers 105 ml / 3.55 105 ml / 3.55 oz 105 ml / 3.55 oz
RUNNING GEAR TOURIST / SPORTSMAN SOLO Frame Tubular welded Rear wheel suspension Swing arm with hydraulic spring shock absorbers Sidecar: same as -40 Solo: Lower spring rate Front fork Leading link Telescopic spring Sidecar Cushioned body (on rubber cushions) and wheel on long-lever suspension with hydraulic spring shock absorber N/A Brakes Shoe-type with mechanical drive on front, rear and sidecar wheels, front wheel has dual cams. Tires 4″ x 19″ Front & Side: 22 psi cold Rear: 36 psi cold 3.5″ x 18″ Solo: Front 25 psi cold Rear: 32 psi cold -10′s: Front & side: 25 psi cold Rear: 36 psi cold CLEARANCES mm in Valves with engine cold 0.05 0.002 Between spark plug electrodes 0.50 – 0.65 0.020 – 0.026 Between brake shoes and drum 0.3 – 0.70 0.012 – 0.028 Backlash between tooth faces of bevel gears in final drive 0.1 – 0.3 0.004 Between rotor and ignition pickup 0.3 – 0.4 .012 – .016 FREE TRAVEL / ADJUSTMENTS mm in Hand brake control lever 5 – 8 0.2 – 0.3 Clutch control lever 5 – 8 0.2 – 0.3 Foot brake drive pedal ¼ of full stroke of pedal, 25 – 30 1.0 – 1.2 Toe-in throughout motorcycle center distance (exception: Sportsman 0 ° toe-in) 10 N/A Angle of motorcycle inclination to vertical plane (camber angle of rear wheel) 1° away from sidecar N/A Headlight installation (with motorcycle laden) horizontal (high beam) TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS Metric (in repair manual) US Equivalent Location on Bike 29 to 33 Nm 22 ft/lb. to 30 ft/lb. cylinder heads 22 to 25 kgf-m 175 ft/lb. to 185 ft/lb. fly wheel tightening screws 3.8 to 4.2 kgf-m 30 ft/lb. to 40 ft/lb. cylinder 2.1 to 3.0 kgf-m top 14 ft/lb. to 22 ft/lb. shock absorber 3.6 to 5.0 kgf-m bottom 28 ft/lb. to 36 ft/lb. shock absorber 3.0 to 3.4 kgf-m 22 ft/lb. to 26 ft/lb. bearing nut 3.0 to 3-4 kgf-m 22 ft/lb. to 26 ft/lb. final drive to swing arm bolts 1.6 to 1.8 kgf-m 12 ft/lb. to 14 ft/lb. oil pump bolt .8 to 1.0 kgf-m 5 ft/lb. to 8 ft/lb. engine sump 1.4 to 1.8 kgf-m 10 ft/lb. to 14 ft/lb. final drive case nuts 7 to 9 kgf-m 50 ft/lb. to 66 ft/lb. nut fastening the pinion bearing 2.2 to 2.8 kgf-m 16 ft/lb. to 20 ft/lb. reverse gear brake lever 1.8 to 2.0 kgf-m 14 ft/lb. to 16 ft/lb. generator gear nut 14.0 to 16.8 kgf-m 100 ft/lb to 120 ft/lb steering stem nut CONVERSIONS To convert from mm to in, divide by 25.4 (there are 25.4 mm per inch). To convert from liters to gallons, divide by 3.785 (there are 3.78 liters per gallon). To convert from liters to quarts, multiply by 1.056 (there are 1.056 quarts per liter). To convert from liters to pints, multiply by 2.112 (there are 2.112 pints per liter). To convert from km to miles, multiply by .62 (there is .62 mile per km). To convert from km/hr to mph, multiply by .62. To convert from Newton-meter (Nm) to inch-pound, multiply by 8.86. To convert from cm 3 (cc) to pints, divide by 473 (there are 473 cc per pint). To convert Celsius to Fahrenheit, F° = C° x 1.8 = 32°. To convert Fahrenheit to Celsius,C ° = (F° – 32° ) divided by 1.8

1300 Yamaha V-Star Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 07-11-2010

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1) Place motorcycle on a firm level surface and secure in a upright position. 2) Remove saddle bags and saddle bag hardware (Tourer model only) Also remove rear riders pegs (Tourer model requires removal of rear footpeg offset hardware as well) 3) Attach bracket A (right) / B (left) to rear footpeg attachment point using new bolts provided. Remount footpegs/saddlebag hardware over top of brackets A/B. NOTE: Do not attach leveling stand bracket at this time 4) Attach bracket C(right) / D(left) to rear fender sub frame using new bolts provided. (Tourer model only – Saddle bag hardware mounts to the outside of brackets C/D. Brackets C/D mount between chrome side rail and saddlebag hardware.) NOTE: Brackets C/D have welded spacers which attach in toward rear fender 5) Attach top of Bracket E(right) / F(left) to rear of brackets C/D. Brackets E/F mount to the inside of brackets C/D. NOTE: Use ½ inch spacer between brackets E/F and C/D on Tourer model ONLY
6) Attach rear of brackets A/B to TOP of forward hitch arms. Attach bottom to brackets E/F to rear hitch plate. 7) Carefully tighten all bolts at this time ensuring hitch is square with motorcycle. Hitch Bracket Identification Leveling stand screw jack installation 1) Attach leveling stand brackets to brackets A and B 2) Thread right side screw jack into threaded hole on leveling stand bracket attached to bracket A sand adjust leveling jack bolt out. 3) Push motorcycle over from left side until right screw jack is touching floor. 4) Thread left side screw jack into threaded hole on leveling stand bracket attached to bracket B and adjust out until motorcycle will rest upright on both screw jacks. 5) Adjust screw jacks until motorcycle is level. 6) After InstaTrike is attached to or removed from receiver hitch, be sure to remove leveling stands and leveling stand brackets. CAUTION – Use screw jacks to hold motorcycle upright and level ONLY. Do not lift motorcycle with screw jacks. CAUTION – Use care when installing screw jacks. Be certain that motorcycle is always in a stable balanced position.
INSTALLATION OF THE TOW-PAC HITCH CART. 1. Place your motorcycle on a smooth flat surface, like a garage floor, and install leveling stands. Install right leveling stand first. Carefully raise motorcycle off of side stand and install left leveling stand. Caution – Use leveling stands to level motorcycle ONLY. Do not raise motorcycle with stands Caution – Be certain that motorcycle is always in a stable balanced position when installing leveling stands. 2. Assemble the axles, tires and wheels, and fenders onto the tow- pac hitch cart. 3. Carefully align the tow-pac hitch cart’s hitch mount with the receiver hitch on the motorcycle. Now push the hitch mount into the receiver hitch. (this might be a little difficult until you get use to doing it. Removing the paint from the hitch mount and applying a little grease will help.) 4. Place the hitch pin through the receiver hitch and hitch mount ( alignment plate ). Install and tighten the tension bolt

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Demonstrate knowledge of motorcycle braking systems and repair procedures

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 21-11-2010

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Demonstrate knowledge of motorcycle braking system repair procedures. Performance criteria 2.1 Fault diagnosis procedures are described in accordance with service information. Range safety procedures when diagnosing, logical inspection procedure, checking fault codes, recognising wear, damage, scoring, poor adjustment, seized parts, corrosion, air in hydraulics, brake squeal, brake shudder, brake grab. 2.2 Hydraulic cylinder inspection procedures are described in accordance with service information. Range layout of components, cylinder operation, cleaning methods, measuring wear, attention to cleanliness, limits of corrosion and scoring. 2.3 Brake repair procedures are described in accordance with service information. Range repairing cylinders and callipers, safety implications, replacing cables and rods, fitting shoes and pads, adjusting brakes, replacing brake fluid, clearing fault codes, testing brake operation. Please note Providers must be accredited by NZQA, or an inter-institutional body with delegated authority for quality assurance, before they can report credits from assessment against unit standards or deliver courses of study leading to that assessment. Industry Training Organisations must be accredited by NZQA before they can register credits from assessment against unit standards. Accredited providers and Industry Training Organisations assessing against unit standards must engage with the moderation system that applies to those standards. Accreditation requirements and an outline of the moderation system that applies to this standard are outlined in the Accreditation and Moderation Action Plan (AMAP). The AMAP also includes useful information about special requirements for organisations wishing to develop education and training programmes, such as minimum qualifications for tutors and assessors, and special resource requirements

2005-2007 KTM MOTORCYCLE REPAIR MANUAL

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Filed Under (KTM) by admin on 21-11-2010

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Adjustments -Take notice of the position of the compression adjustment 1 ! -Count the amount of clicks by turning the adjustment screw clockwise till fully closed. -Remove the rubber cap out of the axleclamp. -Take notice of the position of the rebound adjustment 2 ! -Count the amount of clicks by turning the adjustment screw clockwise till fully closed. -For the standard position see setting list. Position of the compression and rebound adjustment -Set the rebound position 1 , see KTM-Owners manual. -Assemble the rubber cap. -Set the compression position 2 , see KTM-Owners manual. 1 2 2-22 Repair manual WP Fork “Closed Cartridge” Art.No.: 3.211.199-E Explanation of the spring preload -Total spring length without the spacers, see chapter inspection of the spring! -Spring length with spacers 1 , see setting list. -Spring with the spacers. 1 . -The spring is assembled in the front fork leg. NOTE: the distance of “B” is less then the length of “A”. A – B = Spring preload A 1 1 B 2-23 Air release screw -Place the motorcycle on the stand. NOTE: the front wheel must be lift of the floor! -Unscrew the air release screw 1 of the screw cap on top of the front fork and tighten after approx. 10 seconds the air release screw. Recommended periodic maintenance and inspection of the 4860 SX/SXS/SMR front fork 1 A 100 liter fuel consumption is equivalent to approx. 15 operating hours Clean dust scrapers (after 1 hour) Bleed fork legs regularly – after every cleaning Check the inner tubes on scratches / leakage Visual check of damaging of the outer-tubes / replace if necessary Complete service without disass. the closed cartridge of the fork Complete service including the closed cartridge of the front fork Dismounting the fork -Place your motorcycle on a stand. -Notice the position of the front fork in the triple-clamps. NOTE: To remove the front fork. Read your KTM Instruction Manual or Workshop Manual. 3-3 Mounting the fork -Clean the innerside of the triple-clamps with brake cleaner. -Slide both fork legs into the triple-clamps. NOTE: Pay attention to the position of the fork legs. Standard riding height! NOTE: The maximum riding height is the level of the second groove! -Tighten the middle bolt of the lower triple clamp to a torque of 17 Nm! -Tighten the first bolt of the lower triple clamp to a torque of 17 Nm! -Tighten the third bolt of the lower triple clamp to a torque of 17 Nm!

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Motorcycle LED lights RENEGADE LIGHTS Disconnection Guide

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 29-01-2011

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1. Make sure your bike is cool and parked on a flat secure surface! 2. Find your battery (you may have to remove your seat or side covers in order to get to your battery) Disconnect the NEGATIVE ( -) cable. Negative battery cable must be disconnected from the battery in order to avoid safety hazards! Be sure as you disconnect the Negative cable that it does not touch or make contact with your Positive terminal 3. Disconnect the fuse holder from the battery – both the positive ( +) and negative ( -) sides. 4. Cut the wire to the light that is not working with the side cutters. 5. At the problem light twist the light case back and forth slowly and then pull firmly, DO NOT yank to remove from the motorcycle. 6. If the motorcycle led light does not come off easily, repeat the twisting motion back and froth until you feel the light loosen – then pull. 7. Pull the motorcycle led light away from the motorcycle slowly until the cut end of wire falls free. 8. If you will NOT be using your motorcycle until the new lights arrive, you may stop at this step. SAFETY POINT: Otherwise, where you cut the wire, you need to dead end or tape the cut wire. This will keep it from shorting out until the new motorcycle led light is installed. 9. Reconnect fuse holder to battery. 10. Reconnect the battery and then install the seat. 11. Return the motorcycle led light or lights to Renegade Lights along with Warranty Return Policy Form. 12. Renegade Lights will return your new motorcycle led lights along with instructions for installing them.

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BMW F 650 GS Repair Manual And Maintenance schedule

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 19-11-2010

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Replace oil in telescopic forks Check the coolant and restore to correct level if necessary *) Replace the coolant (every 2 years) every 2years Check valve clearances, adjust if necessary Replace the spark plug Drain the outlet hose from the air filter box Replace intake air filter If motorcycle is operated in very dirty or dusty conditions, clean or replace the intake air filter every 10,000 km (6,000 miles); check every 3,000 km (1,800 miles) Replace fuel filter (every 20,000 km/12,000 miles) 20,000 km Check clutch play, adjust if necessary Check wheel spoke tension and tighten if necessary more frequently if motorcycle is ridden in severe off-road conditions Examine brake pads and discs for wear, replace if necessary *) more frequently if motorcycle is ridden in severe off-road conditions Check brake fluid level at front and rear and top up if necessary *) Check for operation of brake system and freedom from leaks; repair/replace if necessary *) Replace the brake fluid at least once a year Replace the primary front/rear brake master cylinder cup (every 40,000 km/24,000 miles on a motorcycle with ABS ) 40,000 km Check wheel bearings and replace if necessary *) Check or, if necessary, replace chain, sprocket, chain guide rollers and pinion *) more frequently if motorcycle is ridden in severe off-road conditions Check chain tension and adjust if necessary *) Check battery acid level, add distilled water if necessary more frequently if motorcycle is ridden in severe off-road conditions Clean and grease the battery terminals, if necessary Check steering head bearings and adjust *) or replace if necessary *) Grease the side and main stands Grease the brake pedal Check bolts and nuts on engine mountings, frame connections, exhaust system mountings, swinging fork pivot, suspension levers, brake pedal, main and side stands and quick-release axles for tightness Final inspection with road safety and functional check

Basic Motorcycle Maintenance/ Repair Manual

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 24-11-2010

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1. Types of Motorcycles and Components a. Identify off-road, street bikes, three and four wheel cycles. b. Identify motorcycle components. 2. Demonstrate Safe Working Habits in the Shop. a. Demonstrate, list, and discuss personal safety habits. b. Demonstrate, list, and discuss shop safety. 3. Correct use of Tools (common and measuring) and Equipment a. Perform work on cycles using proper hand tools. b. Perform work on cycles using shop equipment correctly. 4. Specifications in a Shop Manual a. Locate engine tune-up specification. b. Locate engine lubrication and cooling capacities. 5. Identify and Describe Different Types of Fasteners a. Threaded and non-threaded. b. Nuts, bolts, and washers. c. Metric and English. d. Strength and Grade. e. Thread inserts. 6. Identification and Description of Engine Fundamentals a. Basic two cycle engine. b. Basic four cycle engine. c. Displacement and compression ratios. d. Horsepower and torque. 7. Disassembly, Service, and Reassembly of the Components of the Clutch and Final Drive Assembly a. Remove, measure and replace clutch components. b. Clean, lubricate, and measure chain. c. Clean and measure sprockets. d. Adjust and align rear wheel. e. Discuss shaft drive. 8. Service of Brakes, Tires, and Wheel Assemblies a. Service and adjust drum brake. b. Service disc brake caliper. c. True a wheel by adjusting spokes. d. Replace or repair a tire. 9. Attitudes and Work Habits a. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting criticism and praise. b. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording data. c. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including solving problems in groups, building consensus, and responding to supervision

2004 Vengeance MOTORCYCLE OWNERS MANUAL

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Filed Under (Vengeance) by admin on 21-11-2010

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Vengeance Warrior • Vengeance Raider • Vengeance Vertebreaker • Vengeance Striker • Vengeance Vendetta • Vengeance Vindicator Shifting Gears Starting off and changing gears requires coordination of the clutch and throttle and gearshift lever. If you don’t do things right, the amount of control you have over the bike is lessened. To start off, pull in the clutch, shift into first gear, roll on the throttle a little, and ease out the clutch. You will become familiar with the friction zone (that’s where the clutch begins to take hold and move the bike), and you add a bit more throttle. You don’t want to stall the engine, nor do you want to over-rev it. There’s a sweet spot in there; find it. Shift while traveling in a straight line. Shifting in a curve is not good practice, and something to be avoided. Become familiar with the sound of your engine, so you can tell when you should shift without looking at your instruments. When you downshift to a lower gear, you should (in one swift, smooth movement) be able to squeeze the clutch, rev the engine a little to let it catch the lower gear smoothly, and shift down. When you come to a stop in traffic, leave the bike in first gear with the clutch disengaged (just in case you want to accelerate out of there in a hurry). Who knows what may be coming up behind you. Braking Don’t ever forget: The front brake on your motorcycle can supply as much as 70 percent or more of your stopping power. The single most important thing you can learn about braking is to use that front brake every single time you want to slow down. Always apply both the front and the rear brakes at the same time. If necessary, apply them hard, but not so hard that you lock up either wheel. A locked wheel, as well as causing the bike to skid, results in downright inefficient braking. Turning When you are riding along the road, you lean a motorcycle into a turn. Learning to lean is an essential part of riding a motorcycle. It is a normal function of the bike when you are changing its path of travel – and quite different from turning the steering wheel of your car. To get the motorcycle to lean in a normal turn, press the handlebar in the direction of the turn and maintain slight pressure on that handlebar to take you smoothly through that particular turn. In other words: press right to go right; press left to go left. Your instincts to keep the motorcycle on a smooth path while keeping it from falling over usually take care of this without you even noticing it. (Demonstrate to yourself how a motorcycle moves by pressing a handlebar slightly while traveling in a straight line. The motorcycle will move in the direction of the handlebar you pushed.)

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