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Electronic Speedo Drive for Toyota T50 5 Speed Transmission

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Filed Under (Toyota Manuals) by admin on 20-09-2011

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Disassembly is simple, remove the “C” clip from the drive housing , just above the drive gear. This will allow the shaft/gear assembly to be withdrawn from the housing. Remove the “O” ring from the housing. Wash all parts internally and externally to remove oil, grease and road grime This will allow the shaft/gear assembly to be withdrawn from the housing. Remove the “O” rings from the housing. Remove the three (3) philips head screws from the cover on the top of the drive housing. Carefully remove cover, be aware that the small parts in side may be stuck to the cover. Remove all internal parts, record order of assembly. Wash housing and shaft to remove oil, grease and road grime. The T50 drive shaft needs to be shortened to a similar length to the AE101. I reassembled the AE101 shaft and housing, and then measured from the top face of the AE101 housing down to the top of the AE101 drive shaft. ( Fig.4) Record this reference depth, (I got 17mm)

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KTM 3V TURBO DRIVE MODEL 9808T KNEE FEED Installation and Removal Manual

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Filed Under (KTM) by admin on 28-01-2012

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Gather together the following items that you will need to complete this installation. a) lathe b) 3/8″ electric hand drill c) 9/32″ diameter transfer punch SERVO Turbo Drive Model 9808T Page 2 d) .4375 drill, 3/16″ drill, #7 drill e) 1/4-20 tap f) 3/4″ socket wrench g) set of inch hex wrenches h) clean shop rag Step 2: Clean the power feed mounting area completely. Step 3: Remove the drive clutch nut and the drive clutch from the elevating jack shaft. Step 4: Remove the dial nut, dial, and dial carrier. Keep the dial for reuse later. Step 5: Remove the existing bearing retainer. Keep the screws for reuse later. Step 6: Pull jack shaft out of knee. Hold inboard end up while removing to avoid damage to the pinion gear. Step 7: Press the bearing off the jack shaft. Step 8: Drill and ream the end of the jack shaft .4375″ diameter by 13/16″ deep. The .4375″ dia. must be concentric to the shaft O.D. within .002″ T.I.R. Chamfer 1/32″ x 1/2″ diameter. For best results, machining should be done in a lathe. Step 9: Place the shaft extension #6975 into the end of the jack shaft. Finish drill 3/16″ diameter through the shaft and pin the extension with the 3/16″ diameter x 5/8″ long roll pin. File smooth. Step 10: Reassemble and replace the jack shaft in the machine. Step 11: Replace the existing bearing retainer with #57904 retainer provided. Secure using existing screws. Step 12: Slip spacer #5426 and bearing race #1616 onto the jack shaft. Slide the adaptor #0771 over the bearing race and locate against front of the knee.

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1994 – 2004 BMW Motorcycle History

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 17-11-2010

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1994 brought many changes to BMW, most obviously by the introduction of the “R259″ series twins and the elimination of the old standby “Airhead” twins that had been BMW’s trademark for seven decades. While it is interesting to look at all the technologies introduced during the 1994 to 2004 time block, it is also exciting to look into what was going on as far as changes in BMW more esoteric than measurable. In this author’s opinion there were unspoken changes in BMW’s mindset and philosophy. BMW had forged it’s reputation for long lasting, simple machines built to the highest standards and quality; aimed at a dwindling, older (OK, Jeff, more mature) market of enthusiastic but eccentric riders. They built motorcycles that were easy for the owners to maintain and modify to fit their specific wants. BMW had always built their bikes their way; often it seemed like they did so in spite of what the younger and upwardly mobile riders were looking for. By 1994, the airhead was simply not a sellable motorcycle; the buying market was younger and wanted performance in line with what the Japanese products offered at much lower prices. The K 75/100 series that were so far ahead of their time in 1984 when they were introduced were also showing their age. No doubt, BMW knew this was coming many years before the new “Oil Head” was introduced. They knew that the riding community had reduced its mean age substantially. The younger riders had money to spend on a bike that had to be BMW, yet had to be totally more modern both in performance and in perception than what BMW had been selling. Thus, the R259 was born. The Birth of the R259 Twins The new BMW corporate mindset, if you will, was no longer concerned with selling motorcycles that would be handed down from one generation to the next, nor was BMW concerned about ease of maintenance with standard hand tools. Although the new bikes were still able to outlast the riders, the concern for building units to last a quarter-million miles was not so much in the forefront of the design. The new models would have to be powerful, fast, handle better than anything on the road; they would need to offer a standard of technology that the Japanese would never build. They should be complex pieces of rolling art. Most obvious, though, was that they would build a product aimed at an entirely new market of riders who would likely not be interested in maintaining the bikes themselves or really understanding the nuances of design. The new customers BMW was looking for were serious riders who were more interested in the fun and excitement of riding than they were in savoring the history of the older designs

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HARLEY DAVIDSON SHIFTER SHAFT COVER WITH INSERT INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 03-02-2011

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INSTALLATION 1 2 4 3 5 6 7 is01872 1. Shifter shaft 2. Inner cover 3. Toe shifter lever 4. Outer cover 5. Set screw (for outer cover) 6. Set screw (for inner cover) 7. Casting Figure 1. Shifter Shaft Covers 1. See Figure 1. Remove the stock heel shift lever and toe shift lever (3) from the gear shifter shaft (1). 2. Install the set screw (6) into the inner gear shifter shaft cover (2). 3. Install inner gear shifter shaft cover with installed set screw over the casting (7) in-board of the shifter shaft (1). 4. Tighten the set screw until light contact is made with the casting. Do not overtighten. 5. Re-install toe shift lever on the gear shifter shaft. Tighten the shifter retaining screw to 18-22 lb-ft (24-30 Nm) . 6. Install the set screw (5) into the outer gear shifter cover (4). 7. Install outer gear shifter shaft cover with installed set screw over the end of the gear shifter shaft (1). 8. Loosen the set screw slightly to allow the gear shifter shaft cover to rotate. Rotate the cover until the set screw faces down, then tighten the set screw. SERVICE PARTS

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Integral ABS and ASC – new Riding Dynamic Control Systems for BMW Motorcycles

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 16-11-2010

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Entering its next generation, BMW Motorrad Integral ABS is taking a quantum leap in the process of evolution, advancing from a stand-alone solution acting only on the brakes into a fully networked all-round system. Offering the new generation of Integral ABS, BMW Motorrad provides the foundation for additional dynamic riding control systems with a reduction in technical requirements and features. And following the customer’s wishes, this new generation also opens up the option in future for further-reaching rider assistance functions. The first step in this direction is BMW Motorrad ASC Automatic Stability Control available as of 2007. This system serving to control drive spin on a production motorcycles is being introduced as an optional extra on the touring models in the BMW K and Boxer Series. Once again, therefore, BMW is acting as the pioneer in the introduction of advanced safety technologies on the motorcycle. This further enhances the leadership which BMW Motorrad has shown in the area of active safety for more than 15 years. Choosing the right development partner for both systems, BMW Motorrad obviously had to focus on that partner’s specific competence in control technology and the networking of functions within the vehicle. In recent years, major car suppliers have become aware of the technical challenges presented by the motorcycle with its specific riding dynamics and the growing potential for motorcycle control systems in the market. The decisive point in preselection of the development partner was the willingness and ability to develop specialised solutions suitable for use on BMW motorcycles. So taking this into account, joint development of the new generation of ABS brake technology started together with Continental-Teves in early 2003. Integral ABS. BMW Motorrad’s new Integral ABS technology has been developed separately from the previous system and the entire layout of the system has been newly conceived from the ground up. Capitalising on progress in technology in both hydraulics and electronics, the development engineers have succeeded in simplifying the architecture of the system while at the same time enhancing its functions to an even higher standard. The result is supreme stopping power and very short stopping distances even without electrical power assistance on the brakes.

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Harley-Davidson CHAIN DRIVE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 15-04-2012

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1) Assemble & install the chain tensioner assembly over the primary chain as shown in figure 1. 2) Install the compensator sprocket with extender & spacer (numbers 5, 6, & 7, FIG 2)(#7 is not included in this kit), primary chain, chain tensioner, and clutch basket simultaneously onto the motor drive shaft & transmission main shaft. Rotate the chain drive slightly as needed to allow the splines to line-up. 3) Install the chain tensioner nut loosely on the chain tensioner bolt. 4) Install the sliding cam onto the compensator sprocket, & slide the compensating sprocket cover-assembly (#3) over the cam. 5) Apply 2 drops of Rivera “Red” thread-lock on the threads of the motor drive shaft, & install the motor nut loosely with the fingers at this time. The hex spacer (#7) and spacer (#2) as seen in fig.2 are not provided in Rivera Engineering’s chain drive kit. These components are required with some applications, and can be purchased from your local Harley-Davidson dealer. FIG 2 6) Apply 2 drops of Rivera “red” thread-lock on the threads of the transmission main-shaft and loosely install the clutch hub nut (left hand threads). 7) Place the HD “Primary Drive Locking Tool” HD-41214 on the primary chain as shown in figure XXX and tighten the motor sprocket nut to 150-165 foot-pounds. 8)Turn the locking tool 180 degrees and move it to the clutch sprocket. Tighten the clutch hub nut to 70-80 foot pounds (left- hand thread). Adjust chain tension so that the top strand has 5/8″- to-7/8″ of up and down play (cold drive train). Tighten the center bolt nut to 21-29 foot pounds of torque.

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BMW F650 CS Front belt wheel not correctly secured

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 23-11-2010

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2.1 Removal of the front belt wheel Remove the front belt wheel in accordance with the instructions detailed in the F 650 CS Repair Manual. Remove the securing screw of the activated charcoal filter and let the filter canister hang by one side by the hoses, or remove it and lay it aside. Clean the splines and threads of the main shaft in order to remove all traces of Loctite. If necessary, remove corrosion from the main shaft spline (use only a brass bristle brush). 2.2 Visual inspection Check the splines of the main shaft for damage. Replace the main shaft if the splines are damaged (broken, chipped, bent or damaged teeth). Refer to the F 650 CS Repair Manual for this procedure 2.3 Wear check gearbox main shaft- It is extremely important that the techni- cian always check that the dimensions of the gearbox main shaft splines are to specification before proceeding with the installation of a new front belt wheel. This note only applies to motorcycles with accumulated mileage, not to new motorcycles from the crate. If the visual inspection was satisfactory and the main shaft was not replaced for visual damage, a main shaft wear check will be necessary. This check requires the use of BMW Special Tool # 23 4 571 . The adapters are designed for micrometer gauges with stud diameters from 6.35 mm to 6.6 mm. Do not use cellulose-lacquer thinners to clean the adapters as there is a risk of damaging the measuring instruments. Make sure that the micrometer gauges and the adapters are perfectly clean

HARLEY DAVIDSON 45-AMP. UPGRADE ALTERNATOR ROTOR KIT INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 15-03-2011

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This 45-amp Rotor Kit is designed for installation on 1999 and later FLHT, FLHTC, FLHR, FLHRI, FLHRCI and FLTR Model Motorcycles. Existing Rotor Removal 1. Remove seat and disconnect battery terminals, negative cable first. 2. Follow instructions in applicable Service Manual and remove the primary chaincase cover. Remove the clutch, primary chain, compensating sprocket and shaft extension as a single assembly. 3. Remove the alternator rotor spacer, if present. Installation The laminated high-output rotor in this kit contains magnets that are considerably more powerful than those used in most previous rotors. The ROTOR REMOVER/INSTALLER and SHAFT PROTECTOR SLEEVE (HD-41771) must be used to prevent parts damage during rotor removal and installation. 1. See Figure 1. Verify threads are clean and thread the Shaft Protector and Rotor Remover/Installer, if removed. NOTE The Shaft Protector Sleeve not only protects the threads from the splines of the rotor, but acts as a guide to ensure that the rotor is properly centered. 2. Turn thumbscrews of Rotor Remover/Installer into threaded holes in rotor face. CAUTION 1 WARNING 1 WARNING 1 WARNING Kit Number 29999-97B Figure 1. Install Shaft Protector and Rotor Installer Engine Sprocket Shaft 1. Make Sure Threads are Clean 2. Install shaft protector sleeve. Shaft protector sleeve 3. Install Rotor Remover/Installer i04153 Handle Thumbscrew Forcing screw . Center ball on forcing screw in recess at end of engine sprocket shaft. Rotate the handle of the tool in a counterclockwise direction to ease rotor into position over stator. 4. Loosen thumbscrews and remove Rotor Remover/Installer. Remove Shaft Protector Sleeve. 5. Install the shaft extension on engine sprocket shaft. No alternator rotor spacer is necessary). 6. Follow instructions in applicable Service Manual and install the clutch assembly, primary chain and shaft extension as a single assembly. 7. Apply two drops of Red LOCTITE®262 to threads of clutch nut and engine sprocket nut. Tighten nuts as fol- lows: Clutch nut- (left hand threads), 70-80 ft-lbs (94.9-105.5 Nm) Engine sprocket nut- 150-165 ft-lbs (203-223 Nm). 8. Follow instructions in Service Manual and install the Primary Chaincase Cover using new gasket from kit, if necessary.

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HONDA VTX, VTX RETRO AND VALKYRIE DRIVE SHAFT COVER INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 21-12-2010

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1. Place the cover over the drive shaft housing. 2. Hook one end of the springs provided into the lower holes. Wrap the springs around the backside of the drive shaft housing. Using a needle nose pliers stretch the springs and hook them into the upper holes. 3. Note; if springs are too long, shorten and reform end to be able to hook spring in place.

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Suspension Basics for BMW Motorcycles

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 30-11-2010

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tires: Tires are the first part of any suspension system. The design of the tire and even the pressure you run can have a profound affect on the way your motorcycle handles. Stiff, low profile tires will give a sharper feel to the bike, as will higher tire pressures. Those of us who ride our GS’s off the road will decrease the tire pressure to about 50% of the street spec when we are in the dirt. The tire then becomes a very active part of the suspension, but will wallow like an old pig if not re-inflated when pressed back into pavement duty. It still surprises me when we have a customer complain that his BMW needs new shocks when they come in with nearly flat tires. It is possible that the best dollars-per- unit improvement you can make to your BMW may be in keeping the tires inflated. Chassis: There is not much that we can do about the chassis design, unless we are Troy the Welder, but it is a fact that different frames and swing arms flex differently and therefore are part of the suspension. On the Airheads, we often braced various parts of the frame and swing arms, resulting in improved handling that even mere mortals could appreciate. On the latest BMW’s it would take the likes of a Valentino Rossi to even notice if the parts were stiffened. Stiffer is not always better. One of the Japanese racing bike manufactures controls the stiffness of the frame in various areas to allow some flex for better handling. So, Mr. Rossi might not even like it if Troy stiffened his new BMW. Springs: Springs control the ride height of the motorcycle and the ability to allow for different loads. On most BMW’s there is a way to adjust the spring preload to some extent so that the ride can be optimized for a light rider or two-up operation with luggage. Dampers: Dampers control the speed and frequency at which the suspension operates by changing the kinetic (moving) energy to thermal (heat) energy. Without the damper, the suspension would oscillate as each movement occurred, resulting in decreased vehicle control. Dampers on BMW’s fall into two main groups. On airheads, older K bikes, F and G models, and the R1200 HP-2, the front dampers are integrated into the forks. On the rear of the above mentioned -3 – models, and on both ends of all the rest of the bikes, there is a more common shock absorber, around which the spring is located. The HP-2 uses an air spring and air dampened rear shock. Seat: OK, folks, this is here for my old buddy Jeff. We know that a seat isn’t part of suspension, but a bad one sure can make you miserable. We have sent dozens of seats to our friend Mike Harris for inexpensive mods that might improve your riding enjoyment more than any suspension changes you could make! Let us know if we can help you with this most important item

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