bmw r1150rt poly v belt replacement

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BMW Poly-V Belt – R 1100 Models

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 16-11-2010

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Information: In an effort to reduce service volume, a maintenance-free ribbed Poly-V belt was adopted on all R1100 models from engine number 38946130 onwards (09/94 production onwards). This belt does not need to be retentioned (even at the 600 mile service). The old belt required replacement every 24,000 miles. The new style belt is to be replaced every 36,000 miles. Use the same torque procedure as the old belt. Replacement of an old style belt with the new maintenance free belt requires the use of the new parts below: Parts Kit: 12 31 1 342 086 (kit consists of the following) In addition to the Poly-V belt, the following parts were also changed: 1. Top pulley new: steel old: Aluminum 2. Bottom pulley new no spot welds: old: steel w/three spot welds on front 3. Belt new: Ribbed, printing on belt (1342059 Fa. Dayco) or (1341779 Fa. Conti) Slight squeaking may be heard for a short time after a cold start when temperature is below 50°F. The belt should reach it’s correct operating tension soon after the start up. The belt only needs retentioned if the slight squeaking does not stop after warm up.

BMW R850, R1100, R1150, R1200 Oilhead Maintenance Manual

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 16-11-2010

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cold Engine and Drivetrain Procedures Check Alternator Belt Tools Parts T-handle hex – 4mm none Note: In most cases the alternator belt does not need to be checked any more. Early models should have the pulley and belt upgrade that came out a few years ago. Current recommendations are that the belt is installed and adjusted, then not disturbed until 36K when replacement is specified. 1. Remove the four bolts holding the black plastic alternator belt cover at the front of the engine, 4mm T-handle hex. 2. Remove the cover by sliding it straight down. 3. Check the belt for cracks or shredding. 4. Check the belt tension, quite tight, ~1/4″ deflection when you press on the center. Note: Paul Glaves suggests that proper belt tension is when you can twist the belt ~90 degrees, midway between the pulleys. If you can twist it more than 90 degrees, it is too loose. If you cannot twist it 90 degrees, then it is too tight. 5. Leave the cover off for the valve adjustment procedure on the next page. Change Alternator Belt Tools Parts T-handle hex – 4mm alternator belt socket – 13mm ratchet wrench – 13mm torque wrench 1. Remove the four bolts holding the black plastic alternator belt cover at the front of the engine, 4mm T-handle hex. 2. Remove the cover by sliding it straight down. 3. Loosen the 2 nuts and 1 bolt, 13mm, that hold the alternator – one is on top and one is on each side, thus allowing the alternator to pivot down. 4. Remove the old belt. (Some bikes have a pipe that traps the belt – loosen it enough to get the old belt out and the new belt in) 5. Install the new belt being sure it is properly seated. 6. BMW calls for a tensioning torque of 5.9 ft.lb. (8 Nm) on the adjuster bolt on the left side of the bike. You have to get at this bolt from the alternator side and you may have to lift the tank. Alternatively, you can pry the alternator up with a large screwdriver to tension the belt. 7. Once the belt is under proper tension, tighten the 2 nuts and 1 bolt, 13mm, to 15 ft.lb. (20 Nm). 8. Check the belt for proper tension (see above) and proper seating alignment

Harley-Davidson EMERGENCY DRIVE BELT REPLACEMENT KIT Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 24-10-2010

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1. Shift transmission to neutral. Before installation of the emergency belt, to avoid personal injury and/or vehicle damage, secure the motorcycle. Both stand and motorcycle must be on solid, level ground. Failure to follow instructions could result in death or serious injury. 2. See Figure 1. Remove spring clip (4) (if present) and loosen rear axle nut (1). 3. Loosen rear axle adjuster (3) (or adjuster nut, if so equipped) on each side of motorcycle, and move rear wheel to full forward position. 4. Remove the damaged/broken belt. 5. Inspect sprockets and belt guard (2) for damage and/or debris. Remove any debris. If sprockets and belt guard are not damaged, proceed with the installation. 6. Remove belt guard. 40171-97,40146-00 1 WARNING i06186 Figure 1. Axle 1. Axle nut 2. Belt guard 3. Adjuster 4. Spring clip 2 4 1 3 7. See Figure 2. Install feeder strip on emergency belt. 8. Feed strip around transmission sprocket in a counterclockwise direction over frame cross support. 9. See Figure 3. Interlock the “v” ends of the emergency belt. a. Insert a hex socket key in the fourth (4) and ninth (6) tooth holes. b. Place the splice block (2) over the seventh (5) tooth hole. c. Install a socket head set screw (3) in the seventh tooth. Tighten using another hex socket key. d. Move the block to the next tooth, and repeat installation steps (b) and (c) in each tooth until all 12 screws are installed. NOTE There are 16 screws included in this kit. However, only 12 screws will actually be installed in the belt. The remaining four screws are spares. 10. See Figure 4. Grasp the emergency belt at the mid point of the lower run between your thumb and forefinger and lift the belt up to take up any slack in the belt. Measure the distance that the belt deflects (2) under tension (1). When two pounds of tension is applied to the lower run of the emergency belt, the belt deflection should be within the following measurements

BMW F 650 CS Rear belt wheel cracks Removal And Installation Manual

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 12-11-2010

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Relieve the tension of the toothed belt and lift the belt off the belt wheel (refer to F 650CS Repair Manual, 00.57). 2) Remove 6 screws (see arrow in photo at right). 3) Remove the rear belt wheel. 4) Clean and degrease the tapered bores and the threads of the mounting screws 5) Carefully place the new belt wheel in position on the damper, coat the screw threads with Loctite 243 and hand tighten the securing screws. 6) Tighten the securing screws to the specified torque maintaining a diagonally opposite tightening sequence throughout (Torque to 28 NM, curing time 12 hours). 7) Measure the vertical runout of the belt wheel (refer to F 650 CS Repair Manual, 33.15). 8) Install and adjust the rear drive belt (refer to F 650 CS Repair Manual 00.57 – 00.58) 2.1 Removal of the front belt wheel Remove the front belt wheel in accordance with the instructions detailed in the F 650 CS Repair Manual. Remove the securing screw of the activated charcoal filter and let the filter canister hang by one side by the hoses, or remove it and lay it aside. Clean the splines and threads of the main shaft in order to remove all traces of Loctite. If necessary, remove corrosion from the main shaft spline (use only a brass bristle brush). 2.2 Visual inspection Check the splines of the main shaft for damage. Replace the main shaft if the splines are damaged (broken, chipped, bent or damaged teeth). Refer to the F 650 CS Repair Manual for this procedure.

1994 – 2004 BMW Motorcycle History

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 17-11-2010

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1994 brought many changes to BMW, most obviously by the introduction of the “R259″ series twins and the elimination of the old standby “Airhead” twins that had been BMW’s trademark for seven decades. While it is interesting to look at all the technologies introduced during the 1994 to 2004 time block, it is also exciting to look into what was going on as far as changes in BMW more esoteric than measurable. In this author’s opinion there were unspoken changes in BMW’s mindset and philosophy. BMW had forged it’s reputation for long lasting, simple machines built to the highest standards and quality; aimed at a dwindling, older (OK, Jeff, more mature) market of enthusiastic but eccentric riders. They built motorcycles that were easy for the owners to maintain and modify to fit their specific wants. BMW had always built their bikes their way; often it seemed like they did so in spite of what the younger and upwardly mobile riders were looking for. By 1994, the airhead was simply not a sellable motorcycle; the buying market was younger and wanted performance in line with what the Japanese products offered at much lower prices. The K 75/100 series that were so far ahead of their time in 1984 when they were introduced were also showing their age. No doubt, BMW knew this was coming many years before the new “Oil Head” was introduced. They knew that the riding community had reduced its mean age substantially. The younger riders had money to spend on a bike that had to be BMW, yet had to be totally more modern both in performance and in perception than what BMW had been selling. Thus, the R259 was born. The Birth of the R259 Twins The new BMW corporate mindset, if you will, was no longer concerned with selling motorcycles that would be handed down from one generation to the next, nor was BMW concerned about ease of maintenance with standard hand tools. Although the new bikes were still able to outlast the riders, the concern for building units to last a quarter-million miles was not so much in the forefront of the design. The new models would have to be powerful, fast, handle better than anything on the road; they would need to offer a standard of technology that the Japanese would never build. They should be complex pieces of rolling art. Most obvious, though, was that they would build a product aimed at an entirely new market of riders who would likely not be interested in maintaining the bikes themselves or really understanding the nuances of design. The new customers BMW was looking for were serious riders who were more interested in the fun and excitement of riding than they were in savoring the history of the older designs

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