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2001-2002 GL1800/ A CB Radio Replacement/ REPAIR PROCEDURE

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 29-01-2011

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For authorization, call the CB Exchange Radio Order Desk toll free: (888) 997-7278 . The CB Exchange Radio Order Desk hours are Monday thru Friday, 8:30am – 8:00pm EST. BEFORE STARTING ANY REPAIR ON THE CB RADIO, YOU MUST FIRST CALL THE ORDER DESK FOR AUTHORIZATION. Part Number: 08E95-MCA-101RM Honda Code: 7066319 3. After calling the CB Radio Order Desk, an exchange transceiver will be shipped overnight (freight prepaid). 4. Replace the faulty CB Transceiver with the exchange unit (see REPAIR PROCEDURE ). . Remove the seat (see the GL1800 Service Manual, page 2-4). 2. Remove the right rear side cover (page 2-4). 3. Remove the right-hand fairing molding (page 2-8). 4. Remove the right hand top shelter setting bolts and mounting nut (page 2-9). It is not necessary to remove the left-hand fairing molding, shelter bolts, or shelter. 5. Disconnect the 14P CD coupler under the rear seat. Remove and set aside the CD Changer (if equipped). (Continued on page 2) Some customers may experience weak radio transmissions and/or the need to use abnormally high squelch settings for reception on the Hondaline CB Radio. To correct this condition, the CB Transceiver unit must be replaced as described in this Service Bulletin. Do not order a CB kit from parts stock. Follow the ordering procedures in this Service Bulletin. AFFECTED MOTORCYCLES 2001 – 2002 GL1800/A ORDERING AND REPLACING THE CB TRANSCEIVER 1. Before calling the CB Exchange Radio Order Desk, have the following information ready: • VIN • Failure Information (i.e., symptom) • Warranty Status 2. For authorization, call the CB Exchange Radio Order Desk toll free: (888) 997-7278 . The CB

2001 HONDA GL1800/ A Radio Muting Improvement

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 29-01-2011

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1. Place the faulty radio in the same box in which the exchange radio was sent. THE FAULTY RADIO (CORE) MUST BE RETURNED IN THE SAME BOX IN WHICH THE EXCHANGE RADIO WAS SHIPPED. These boxes are identified by the label shown below which is printed on the inside of the lid. 2. Fill out the pre-printed FedEx airbill that came in the box with the exchange radio. The airbill should have the following address preprinted on it: AHM Remanufactured Parts c/o NK Parts Industries Inc./West 2640 Campbell Rd. Sidney, OH 45365-8836 • Do not use an ordinary FedEx airbill. The pre- addressed airbill has a special account number on it for the exchange program. If you need more airbills, call the Radio Order Desk toll free, not your assigned Parts Center . • Write your dealer number and the warranty claim number in the area shown in the sample airbill ffix the FedEx Airbill to the outside of the box. Radios sent in a box not bearing the correct FedEx airbill will not be accepted for reimbursement under this program. 4. Enclose a copy of the HONDANET for Windows warranty claim in the box. If the claim form is incomplete or not in the box, the faulty radio will be returned to your dealership. 5. Ship the faulty radio to the preprinted address on the airbill. NOTE: Do not ship the faulty radio to the manufacturer or the Warranty Parts Inspection (WPI) Center. 6. For your records, on the repair order include the following: • warranty claim number • original part number • FedEx airbill number When the faulty radio is received, a core credit will be posted to your dealership’s Balance Forward Account. The credit can be identified by the claim number + “CORE” (e.g., 12345/CORE). REMEMBER: A copy of the HONDANET for Windows warranty claim must be included in the box. RETURNING THE FAULTY RADIO The faulty radio must be returned within 20 days of

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1994 – 2004 BMW Motorcycle History

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 17-11-2010

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1994 brought many changes to BMW, most obviously by the introduction of the “R259″ series twins and the elimination of the old standby “Airhead” twins that had been BMW’s trademark for seven decades. While it is interesting to look at all the technologies introduced during the 1994 to 2004 time block, it is also exciting to look into what was going on as far as changes in BMW more esoteric than measurable. In this author’s opinion there were unspoken changes in BMW’s mindset and philosophy. BMW had forged it’s reputation for long lasting, simple machines built to the highest standards and quality; aimed at a dwindling, older (OK, Jeff, more mature) market of enthusiastic but eccentric riders. They built motorcycles that were easy for the owners to maintain and modify to fit their specific wants. BMW had always built their bikes their way; often it seemed like they did so in spite of what the younger and upwardly mobile riders were looking for. By 1994, the airhead was simply not a sellable motorcycle; the buying market was younger and wanted performance in line with what the Japanese products offered at much lower prices. The K 75/100 series that were so far ahead of their time in 1984 when they were introduced were also showing their age. No doubt, BMW knew this was coming many years before the new “Oil Head” was introduced. They knew that the riding community had reduced its mean age substantially. The younger riders had money to spend on a bike that had to be BMW, yet had to be totally more modern both in performance and in perception than what BMW had been selling. Thus, the R259 was born. The Birth of the R259 Twins The new BMW corporate mindset, if you will, was no longer concerned with selling motorcycles that would be handed down from one generation to the next, nor was BMW concerned about ease of maintenance with standard hand tools. Although the new bikes were still able to outlast the riders, the concern for building units to last a quarter-million miles was not so much in the forefront of the design. The new models would have to be powerful, fast, handle better than anything on the road; they would need to offer a standard of technology that the Japanese would never build. They should be complex pieces of rolling art. Most obvious, though, was that they would build a product aimed at an entirely new market of riders who would likely not be interested in maintaining the bikes themselves or really understanding the nuances of design. The new customers BMW was looking for were serious riders who were more interested in the fun and excitement of riding than they were in savoring the history of the older designs

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HARLEY DAVIDSON FLHT ADVANCED AUDIO AM/FM/CD RADIO KIT INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 09-02-2011

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INSTALLATION Remove Existing Equipment To prevent accidental vehicle start-up, which could cause death or serious injury, remove maxi-fuse before proceeding. (00251a) 1. Refer to the Service Manual and follow the instructions given to remove the maxi-fuse. 2. Remove outer fairing and windshield. Refer to OUTER FAIRING/WINDSHIELD REMOVAL in Service Manual. 3 2 1 is 00397 1. Socket head screw (4) 2. Radio support bracket (2) 3. Radio Figure 1. AM/ FM Radio Installation 3. See Figure 1. Using a long shank ball end socket (Snap- on® FABL6E or equivalent), remove the four socket head screws (1) to release the storage box from the left and right radio support brackets (2). Use the oblong holes in the fairing brackets to access the screws. Install Radio 1. Pull the storage box forward to remove the box from the opening in the inner fairing. Discard the storage box. 2. Position the radio (3) between the radio support brackets and push it into the opening in the inner fairing. 3. Align the threaded inserts in the sides of the radio with the oblong holes in the left and right radio support brackets. 4. Starting at the rear, install the four socket head screws previously removed. Alternately tighten the screws to 35- 45 in-lbs (4.0-5.1 Nm). 5. Plug the 23-place radio socket housing [27A] (part of the interconnect harness already installed on the vehicle) into the back of the radio. 6. Remove three T25 TORX® screws that hold the speaker opening cover on one end of the fairing. Discard the cover and screws. Install Speakers 1. See Figure 3. If the speaker (3) and adapter (4) are not assembled, or are assembled incorrectly, orient the speaker on the adapter and grille assembly so the speaker spade contacts are toward the side of the adapter with the widest edge. Snap the speaker into the adapter using finger pressure only.

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BMW R1100RT, BMW R1150RT Signal Mirror Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 26-10-2010

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1. These instructions start with the right side mirror. Grab the mirror housing as shown and slowly push down to disengage housing from motorcycle. 2. Once you have the mirror housing removed partially, twist and remove the light bulb from mirror housing. Remove mirror housing and set it on a cloth covered surface. 3. Remove the factory mirror by inserting a slotted screwdriver against each mirror mount snaps. Slowly twist and pry each snap until it releases from motor actuator. Repeat process until factory mirror disengages. NOTE: Insert the slotted screwdriver as close to each of the snaps as possible before prying out the OE mirror. Not doing so may cause the crossbar on the motor actuator to break. Connect the two mating connectors from the adapter Signal® mirror wire harness and the new Signal® mirror wire harness. Cut a slot in the foam disc to accommodate the anti-vibration prongs on the motor adapter. Place the foam disc onto the center of the Signal® mirror motor interface. Connect the Signal® mirror mating connector to the Signal® mirror wire harness. 5. Remove Cap Sheet from two-sided adhesive disc on back of Signal ® mirror. Align the anti-rotation prongs found on the top and bottom or left and right with the corresponding slots on the motor mount. Use the palm of your hand, push down on the Signal® mirror and the mirror housing until the Signal® mirror motor mount is fully engaged. Note: Push firmly on all sides of the Signal® mirror to ensure proper engagement and travel. Not doing so could result in mirror falling off. 6. Locate the light bulb and carefully disconnect the original light blue with black stripe wire [hot wire]. Connect the red wire from the Signal® mirror wire harness to the spade terminal on the light bulb. Connect the original light blue with black stripe wire to the other spade terminal located on the red wire of the Signal® mirror wire harness. Repeat the process for the original brown wire and the black wire from the Signal® mirror wire harness [ground wires]. Insert the light bulb back into the mirror housing. 7. Align the 3-pins with their corresponding snap holes and snap the mirror housing into place. 8. Insert key into the ignition and turn to the “ON” position. Activate the right hand turn indicator to verify that the new Signal® mirror is working correctly. Replace any other accessories necess

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HONDA GL1100 AM/FM RADIO INSTALLATION MANUAL/ WIRING DIAGRAM

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 22-04-2011

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INSTALLATION ■ Outline Procedures This section gives general information needed for mounting the individual radio components on and in the fairing. A) Fairing 1) Install radio on fairing before mounting fairing on motorcycle. (Remove fairing from your motorcycle when already mounted). 2) Remove fairing parts. 3) Drill unit mount holes. 4) Install six wire clips. 5) Install windshield on fairing before install- ing speakers. 6) Install radio indicator I on indicator panel II , then install indicator panel on fairing. 7) Install speakers III. 8) Install nutplate IV. 9) Install Power Amplifier in fairing. 10) Install radio funer VI. 11) Install the radio controller VII. 12) Install controller base panel VIII 13) Install radio switch sub-wire. 14) Connect adapter harness and wires inside fairing by working through left turn signal lens hole. B) Motorcycle frame and handlebar 1) Remove travel trunk and seat. Unscrew four shelter bolts (M6, one on each side at front and rear) to route antenna feeder. 2) Install antenna mount and antenna IX. 3) Route antenna feeder along the frame tube. 4) Install radio switch X on left handlebar lever bracket and route the wires. 3 of 11 Page 4 C) Fairing instllation 1) Install fairing on motorcycle. 2) Connect motorcycle wire harness 9-P coupler to fairing wire 9-P coupler. 3) Connect radio switch wire to switch sub- wire.4) Connect antenna feeder. 5) Confirm that radio operates properly. Reinstall parts removed in step 2 or (A) and in step 1 of (B). REWORKING ■ Remove Fairing and Fairing Parts (Fig.10) 1) Install radio on fairing before mounting fairing on motorcycle. (Remove fairing from your motorcycle when already mounted). 2) Remove right and left fairing pockets, right and left turn signal lenses, right and left nutplates, left hole cover and indi- cator base panel from fairing. (Fig.10) Fig. 10 LEI-1 NU I PLATE 4 of 11■ Reworking on Fairing — Speaker mounting holes- 1) Remove 18 mm grommet. 2) Lightly roll template so that it will follow contour of fairing snugly. 3) Position template on fairing with its upper and outer edges aligned with those offairing as indicated by arrows. 4) Attach template to fairing using adhesive tape where shown. 5) Punch mark centers of four holes with a
drift and hammer. 6) Drill 6 mm holes through marked centers. To obtain a more balanced response with richer, deeper bases, drill two 50 mm holes in the fairing so as to link the speaker box with the inside of the fairing. Fig. 11-1
—Power amplifier mounting holes- 7) Drill two 5.5 mm holes through concaves in fairing. Fig. 11-2 RIGHT HAND SHOWN, LEFT SIMILAR ADHESIVE TAPE

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BMW Motorcycles F 650 GS Dakar fuel tank replacement

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 12-11-2010

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Your center has been requested in a recent e-mail, to forward VIN, color Information: and status information on all F 650 GS(A) and Dakar models remaining in your inventory. Fuel tanks, together with the appropriate colored trim pieces, will be forwarded to your center for each bike in your inventory as replacement parts arrive in BMW NA inventory. Warranty Please enter a warranty campaign claim , encompassing the following Reimbursement: Work Package information, when claiming reimbursement for the updates called for in this bulletin. Even though there is no charge for the parts, a sublet of $60.00 will be applied to each claim. This sublet amount is intended as a combination of both the handling and as reimbursement for incidental items that may be required in the replacement of the fuel tank. Work Package #1 is to be used in the replacement of all F 650 GS(A) and Dakar model fuel tanks. Defect Code: 00 00 16 1100 Description: Fuel Tank – Leaking Flat Rate Code: 00 60 059 Description: Remove and reinstall fuel tank (USA only) FRU: 12 FRU Sublet #4: $60.00 Pick up & In the recent Sales and Marketing Bulletin # B23/00 introducing the “Customer Delivery: Demonstration Program”, (e-mailed to your center on September 7, 2000), each BMW motorcycle retailer was asked to arrange to pick up, complete the updates and deliver the motorcycle back to the customer and to offer the use of a demonstrator where appropriate.

Integral ABS and ASC – new Riding Dynamic Control Systems for BMW Motorcycles

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 16-11-2010

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Entering its next generation, BMW Motorrad Integral ABS is taking a quantum leap in the process of evolution, advancing from a stand-alone solution acting only on the brakes into a fully networked all-round system. Offering the new generation of Integral ABS, BMW Motorrad provides the foundation for additional dynamic riding control systems with a reduction in technical requirements and features. And following the customer’s wishes, this new generation also opens up the option in future for further-reaching rider assistance functions. The first step in this direction is BMW Motorrad ASC Automatic Stability Control available as of 2007. This system serving to control drive spin on a production motorcycles is being introduced as an optional extra on the touring models in the BMW K and Boxer Series. Once again, therefore, BMW is acting as the pioneer in the introduction of advanced safety technologies on the motorcycle. This further enhances the leadership which BMW Motorrad has shown in the area of active safety for more than 15 years. Choosing the right development partner for both systems, BMW Motorrad obviously had to focus on that partner’s specific competence in control technology and the networking of functions within the vehicle. In recent years, major car suppliers have become aware of the technical challenges presented by the motorcycle with its specific riding dynamics and the growing potential for motorcycle control systems in the market. The decisive point in preselection of the development partner was the willingness and ability to develop specialised solutions suitable for use on BMW motorcycles. So taking this into account, joint development of the new generation of ABS brake technology started together with Continental-Teves in early 2003. Integral ABS. BMW Motorrad’s new Integral ABS technology has been developed separately from the previous system and the entire layout of the system has been newly conceived from the ground up. Capitalising on progress in technology in both hydraulics and electronics, the development engineers have succeeded in simplifying the architecture of the system while at the same time enhancing its functions to an even higher standard. The result is supreme stopping power and very short stopping distances even without electrical power assistance on the brakes.

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BMW R1150RT TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 12-11-2010

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miles on his beloved 1150 before trading it in for a new R1200 earlier this year. JOHN TAYLOR, 55 JOHN owned a R1150RT for four years and wishes he had kept it instead of buying the R1200RT. GEORGE EDWARDS, 43 GEORGE runs www.rtrider. co.uk, a website dedicated to BMW RT owners. He owned an 1150 for four years, covering nearly 50,000 miles, and is already up to 6000 miles on the new 1200RT. PERFORMANCE Paul: “The new model feels smoother straight away. It fires quickly, the throttle is lighter and the engine feels more responsive. On the move it just gets up and goes, and it really thrives above 5000rpm. At first I was arriving at corners much quicker than I realised – and two-up performance is a revelation compared to the 1150.” John: “I’m not that impressed with the new model. The 1150 would cruise at 5000rpm-plus like a turbine. By comparison, the new 1200 feels very harsh above 4400rpm in top. The 1200 has more power, but lacks the low down grunt that the older bike had. However, once you rev it there’s noticeably more power. “Fuel consumption varies from 58 to 46 miles to the gallon, depending on the terrain and my right hand.” George: “I always ride two-up with the wife, and usually fully loaded, so the extra power is really noticeable. There’s much more punch out of corners, compared to the old 1150 which felt a bit sluggish. “With the new bike there’s a surge of power, especially above 6000rpm, but there’s still plenty of low down grunt, too. It also means that you don’t have to change down the gearbox so often. On the old 1150 I used to drop down to fifth gear on A and B roads, as it didn’t have the grunt for overtaking in top. The new 1200 is far better, I just leave it in top most of the time.” RIDING Paul: “The 1200′s seat is slightly higher than the 1150, but the new bike is still easier to manoeuvre at low speeds and the top heavy feeling has virtually gone. “The back brake is also improved, and the front feels more progressive than the 1150 – but I wouldn’t say it was better, only different. The suspension takes care of rougher surfaces in a more gentle way and it’s better two-up, too – less likely to ground out. There’s been many a time when we’ve scraped the 1150′s centrestand during fast cornering.” John: “The weight reduction has made the new bike easier to ride, especially on back roads. However, on long fast sweepers it doesn’t feel as planted as the old 1150. “Low speed handling is much better on the new bike and the rear brake is much better as well. I hated the old linked-brake system – it was too sharp, a nightmare in a gravelly car park two-up. The non-linked brakes on the new bike are far better. “The low beam is also much better

HARLEY DAVIDSON RADIO FACEPLATE TRIM INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 04-02-2011

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INSTALLATION NOTE Mounting surface of radio faceplate trim must be above 60°F (16°C), or the trim may not stay attached. 1. Using a 50:50 isopropyl alcohol/water solution, thoroughly clean the surface where the radio faceplate trim will be installed. Do not clean with denatured alcohol, mineral spirits, or other solvent products, or damage to the radio may occur. (00411b) 2. Allow the surface to dry completely before continuing to install kit. 3. Test the fit of the radio faceplate trim prior to removing adhesive backing. 4. Remove the adhesive backing from the back of the radio faceplate trim. 5. Open the auxiliary jack cap and feed it through the radio faceplate trim. 6. See Figure 1. Position the radio faceplate trim and press firmly into place. 7. Let the adhesive cure for at least 24 hours at no less than 60°F (16°C).