bmw r60 push rod measurement

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Harley Davidson Five Speed Transmissions Hydraulic Clutch Modification

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 31-10-2010

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Hydraulic Clutch Modification for Harley Davidson With Champion Reverse Gear 1 1.1 Install Reverse Gear Assembly to gearbox. 1.2 Remove clutch cover (left side). 1.3 Remove Release Plate (clutch adjustment) and Push Rods. 1.4 Install Hydraulic Clutch Release Cover with supplied spacer and two gaskets. 1.5 Bleed clutch system. NOTE: When bleeding clutch system, lever feel will become hard, do not force lever because piston is at end of travel.(Continue Bleeding) 2 2.1 Install Push Rod. 2.2 Push the rod into clutch assembly to force hydraulic piston to its start position. Push the rod hard until the clutch cylinder is fully compressed. This is the start position. 2.3 Install Hydraulic Clutch Throw-Out Bearing Holder and bearing to push rod. Do not install circlip at this time. 2.4 If the throw-out bearing holder does not fully seat into the Pressure Plate (Figure 2.4), proceed to step 2.5. If shaft is too short then use throw-out bearing holder from Champion Reverse Gear Kit, skip next step and proceed to 3.0 2.5 Measure distance between bearing holder and pressure plate (ensure that push rod is pushed in) Figure 2.4 2.6 Remove bearing holder and push rod, reinstall bearing holder until seated (without push rod). Measure distance from pressure plate to bearing holder. Figure 2.6 2.7 Add measurements taken in steps 2.5 and 2.6 2.8 Add 0.090″ to total of step 2.7 (allowance for clutch plate wear). Measurement should be approximately 1/8″. 2.9 Measure push rod length. 2.10 Subtract measurement of step 2.8 from measurement of step 2.9 (push rod length). This measurement represents the amount of material to be removed from ball end of push rod. (Step 2.11)

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Yamaha V-Star 1100 Custom and Classic cruisers Floorboard/ Footpeg Extension Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 09-11-2010

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Start on the right (brake) side. 1) Loosen the nut at the end of the brake rod. This will allow you to unscrew the brake rod from the brake lever clevis later. 2) Pull out the cotter pin and remove the pivot pin. Unscrew the clevis 3) Then using a 14mm socket or box-end wrench, remove the two bolts that hold the brake floorboard/footpeg assembly (whichever your bike has) to the frame. These bolts are torqued to 46 ft lbs, so this may be a bit difficult. 1. Loosen this nut 2. Remove the cotter pin (other side of this pivot pin) remove the pivot pin a unscrew the nut to remove the clevis nd 3. Remove these bolts When you remove the floorboard/footpeg bracket, be careful not to pull the brake switch wires loose. You may wish to cut the cable tie for more room, and then rest the bracket, with the footpeg or floorboard attached, on a short box, or block of wood, to keep it handy. Install the new brake rod, to the end of the existing brake rod. Re-install the pivot pin, and the pivot pin cotter pin. Installing the extension bar: Note that the extension bar is bolted so that it rises up in front. Use the new bolts to mount the floorboard/ footpeg bracket to the threaded holes in front. Install the Extension in the proper orientation (angled holes bolt up to the frame, with front of the bar higher than the rear – see photo) using the stock bolts for the extensions to the frame and the new bolts and washers supplied with the kit, on the forward threaded section to relocate the floorboard or footpeg bracket. The use of LocTite ® Blue here is recommended. At this point the right side Floorboard or Footpeg should be secured tightly and the brake lever hanging loose. Now install the Brake rod extension, threading the male end to the original brake rod. Don’t tighten this end yet Place the clevis over the forward most end of the brake rod extension, and threat the clevis nut onto the end of the rod. Bring the brake rod upright, to meet with the clevis at the end of the brake rod extension and replace the pivot pin. Before reinstalling the cotter pin, check the angle of the brake lever, to insure that you have the brake pedal where you want. If necessary, adjust the extension rod in or out, until you are satisfied, and then reinstall the cotter pin into the pivot pin. Check the Brake switch wire and install a new cable tie if required. Note: Due to utilizing a thicker material, 1/2″ versus 3/8″ from our competitor, the Brake rod is now positioned at a greater angle. Even with the angle, braking performance is not affected, but if you wish to bring the master cylinder in line with the brake rod, do this. Loosen the rear, and remove the front Allen bolt. Then place two washers behind the front bolt, under the bracket, and then re-install the bolts To change the angle of the brake rod, 1) loosen and remove the two master cylinder bracket Allen bolts 2) insert two washers behind the front bolt (front of the bike), behind the master cylinder bracket 3) tighten both bolts. Do not install any washers on the rear mounting hole. This will make the angle of the Brake Rod less aggressive. Step Two – Left Side For the left (Shifter) side, 1) use an open-end 10 mm wrench, to unscrew the two nuts that hold the shift rod in place. PLEASE note that one end of the shift rod has a left hand threaded nut. SAVE the nuts, as you will need them on the new longer Polished Stainless Steel Shift Rod. 2) Remove the stock shift rod. 3) Then using a 14mm socket or box-end wrench, remove the two bolts that hold the shifter floorboard/footpeg assembly (whichever your bike has) to the frame.

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1994 – 2004 BMW Motorcycle History

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 17-11-2010

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1994 brought many changes to BMW, most obviously by the introduction of the “R259″ series twins and the elimination of the old standby “Airhead” twins that had been BMW’s trademark for seven decades. While it is interesting to look at all the technologies introduced during the 1994 to 2004 time block, it is also exciting to look into what was going on as far as changes in BMW more esoteric than measurable. In this author’s opinion there were unspoken changes in BMW’s mindset and philosophy. BMW had forged it’s reputation for long lasting, simple machines built to the highest standards and quality; aimed at a dwindling, older (OK, Jeff, more mature) market of enthusiastic but eccentric riders. They built motorcycles that were easy for the owners to maintain and modify to fit their specific wants. BMW had always built their bikes their way; often it seemed like they did so in spite of what the younger and upwardly mobile riders were looking for. By 1994, the airhead was simply not a sellable motorcycle; the buying market was younger and wanted performance in line with what the Japanese products offered at much lower prices. The K 75/100 series that were so far ahead of their time in 1984 when they were introduced were also showing their age. No doubt, BMW knew this was coming many years before the new “Oil Head” was introduced. They knew that the riding community had reduced its mean age substantially. The younger riders had money to spend on a bike that had to be BMW, yet had to be totally more modern both in performance and in perception than what BMW had been selling. Thus, the R259 was born. The Birth of the R259 Twins The new BMW corporate mindset, if you will, was no longer concerned with selling motorcycles that would be handed down from one generation to the next, nor was BMW concerned about ease of maintenance with standard hand tools. Although the new bikes were still able to outlast the riders, the concern for building units to last a quarter-million miles was not so much in the forefront of the design. The new models would have to be powerful, fast, handle better than anything on the road; they would need to offer a standard of technology that the Japanese would never build. They should be complex pieces of rolling art. Most obvious, though, was that they would build a product aimed at an entirely new market of riders who would likely not be interested in maintaining the bikes themselves or really understanding the nuances of design. The new customers BMW was looking for were serious riders who were more interested in the fun and excitement of riding than they were in savoring the history of the older designs

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Integral ABS and ASC – new Riding Dynamic Control Systems for BMW Motorcycles

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 16-11-2010

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Entering its next generation, BMW Motorrad Integral ABS is taking a quantum leap in the process of evolution, advancing from a stand-alone solution acting only on the brakes into a fully networked all-round system. Offering the new generation of Integral ABS, BMW Motorrad provides the foundation for additional dynamic riding control systems with a reduction in technical requirements and features. And following the customer’s wishes, this new generation also opens up the option in future for further-reaching rider assistance functions. The first step in this direction is BMW Motorrad ASC Automatic Stability Control available as of 2007. This system serving to control drive spin on a production motorcycles is being introduced as an optional extra on the touring models in the BMW K and Boxer Series. Once again, therefore, BMW is acting as the pioneer in the introduction of advanced safety technologies on the motorcycle. This further enhances the leadership which BMW Motorrad has shown in the area of active safety for more than 15 years. Choosing the right development partner for both systems, BMW Motorrad obviously had to focus on that partner’s specific competence in control technology and the networking of functions within the vehicle. In recent years, major car suppliers have become aware of the technical challenges presented by the motorcycle with its specific riding dynamics and the growing potential for motorcycle control systems in the market. The decisive point in preselection of the development partner was the willingness and ability to develop specialised solutions suitable for use on BMW motorcycles. So taking this into account, joint development of the new generation of ABS brake technology started together with Continental-Teves in early 2003. Integral ABS. BMW Motorrad’s new Integral ABS technology has been developed separately from the previous system and the entire layout of the system has been newly conceived from the ground up. Capitalising on progress in technology in both hydraulics and electronics, the development engineers have succeeded in simplifying the architecture of the system while at the same time enhancing its functions to an even higher standard. The result is supreme stopping power and very short stopping distances even without electrical power assistance on the brakes.

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SUSPENSION SERVICE TOOLS/ FORK DAMPER ROD BLEED TOOL

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 30-11-2010

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33 SHOP EQUIPMENT & TOOLS SUSPENSION SERVICE TOOLS K&L FORK TUBE U-BLOCKS Precision machined from billet aluminum, these quality three piece sets are a handy, accurate and safe way to straighten and check fork tubes. 35-9411 36mm (for 33 thru 36mm tubes) 35-9412 40mm (for 37 thru 40mm tubes) 35-9413 43mm (for 41 thru 43mm tubes) 35-9414 46mm (for 44 thru 46mm tubes) 35-1964 35-8579 35-7995 DAMPER ROD HOLDERS Holds damper rod when disassembling forks. 35-8578 Yamaha front forks, 43mm Kayaba YZ125/250 (1988) YZ490 (88-90) 35-8579 Yamaha YZ125/250 with UD(upside down) forks FORK DAMPER ROD TOOLS Sold each. 35-7995 Combination Fork Damper Tool Designed to hold the damper rod during assembly & disassembly of Honda XR400′s or Suzuki DR-Z400S. One end features spanner type prongs for the XR400 and the other a 27mm hex for Suzuki. 35-1964 Combination Damper Rod Fork Tool Designed for assembly and disassembly of most inverted Kayaba and Showa 41mm, 43mm, 46, and 47mm forks. Use one end for Kayaba forks and the other for Showa forks. (not required for 91-92 Honda CR models) ROD HOLDER Double sided damper rod holder. Works on Kayaba U.D (upside down) 41mm forks. 35-8580 Yamaha YZ125/250Amodels (89-90) FRONT FORK CAP SOCKET Designed to remove and install Yamaha front fork caps with female hex head. Sold each. 35-8571 14mm female socket 35-8573 19mm female socket FORK DAMPER ROD HOLDERS Holds damper rod when disassembling and assembling front forks. 35-8576 Use for Yamaha 43mm Kayaba forks, 30mm hex YZ125 (84-87), YZ250 (81-87) IT250 (1983) YZ490 (82-87) 35-8577 Use for Yamaha 38mm Kayaba forks, 24mm hex YZ125 (81-83), IT175 (82-83), IT250 (81-82) YZ250 (77-80), YZ400 (77-79), IT465 (81-82) FORK CAP WRENCH Designed to remove the front fork caps on late model Honda CR’s and Suzuki RM’s. Can also be used for adjusting compression. One end of wrench is 49mm, the other is 50mm. Sold each. 35-7803 Fork Cap Wrench 35-8576 35-8577 35-8571 35-8573 6 Point Hex 35-8578

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HARLEY DAVIDSON ALUMINUM SHIFTER LINKAGE REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 15-02-2011

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REMOVAL 1. See Figure 1. Remove stock shifter rod (D). 2. Adjust new shifter rod in kit to match the length of the removed shifter rod by loosening locknuts (3), adjusting the length of the rod, then tightening locknuts to 20-24 ft- lbs (27-32 Nm) . 3. For models with a straight rear shifter rod lever: Discard spacer (7). Place cover (1) over the shifter rod lever (C). For models with an offset rear shifter rod lever: Place spacer (7) and cover (1) over the shifter rod lever (C). INSTALLATION 1. Apply Loctite® 243 to threads of capscrew (5) and install cap screw through the rear of the shifter rod and into the shifter rod lever. Tighten cap screw to 13-16 ft-lbs (18-22 Nm) . 2. For 1999 and later FLHT, FLHX, FLHR, and FXDWG models: Place the rod end on the outside of the shifter lever, then apply Loctite® 243 to the threads of capscrew (5). Attach the front of the shifter rod (6) to the shifter lever with capscrew (5) and acorn nut (4) (with acorn nut facing out). Tighten acorn nut (4) to 13-16 ft-lbs (18-22 Nm) . For all models except 1999 and later FLHT, FLHX, FLHR, and FXDWG: Place the rod end on the inside of the shifter lever then apply Loctite® 243 to the threads of cap screw (5). Attach the front of the shifter rod (6) to the shifter lever with cap screw and acorn nut (4). Tighten acorn nut (4) to 13-16 ft-lbs (18-22 Nm)

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BMW R1100RT, BMW R1150RT Signal Mirror Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 26-10-2010

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1. These instructions start with the right side mirror. Grab the mirror housing as shown and slowly push down to disengage housing from motorcycle. 2. Once you have the mirror housing removed partially, twist and remove the light bulb from mirror housing. Remove mirror housing and set it on a cloth covered surface. 3. Remove the factory mirror by inserting a slotted screwdriver against each mirror mount snaps. Slowly twist and pry each snap until it releases from motor actuator. Repeat process until factory mirror disengages. NOTE: Insert the slotted screwdriver as close to each of the snaps as possible before prying out the OE mirror. Not doing so may cause the crossbar on the motor actuator to break. Connect the two mating connectors from the adapter Signal® mirror wire harness and the new Signal® mirror wire harness. Cut a slot in the foam disc to accommodate the anti-vibration prongs on the motor adapter. Place the foam disc onto the center of the Signal® mirror motor interface. Connect the Signal® mirror mating connector to the Signal® mirror wire harness. 5. Remove Cap Sheet from two-sided adhesive disc on back of Signal ® mirror. Align the anti-rotation prongs found on the top and bottom or left and right with the corresponding slots on the motor mount. Use the palm of your hand, push down on the Signal® mirror and the mirror housing until the Signal® mirror motor mount is fully engaged. Note: Push firmly on all sides of the Signal® mirror to ensure proper engagement and travel. Not doing so could result in mirror falling off. 6. Locate the light bulb and carefully disconnect the original light blue with black stripe wire [hot wire]. Connect the red wire from the Signal® mirror wire harness to the spade terminal on the light bulb. Connect the original light blue with black stripe wire to the other spade terminal located on the red wire of the Signal® mirror wire harness. Repeat the process for the original brown wire and the black wire from the Signal® mirror wire harness [ground wires]. Insert the light bulb back into the mirror housing. 7. Align the 3-pins with their corresponding snap holes and snap the mirror housing into place. 8. Insert key into the ignition and turn to the “ON” position. Activate the right hand turn indicator to verify that the new Signal® mirror is working correctly. Replace any other accessories necess

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HARLEY DAVIDSON SPORTSTER ALUMINUM SHIFT LINKAGE KITS INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 10-03-2011

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INSTALLATION 1. See Figure 1. Remove stock capscrews (4) and stock shifter rod (2). Discard stock capscrews. 2. See Figure 2 and Table 2. Loosen the lock nuts (5) and turn the rod ends on the new aluminum shifter rod (1) to match the length of the stock shifter rod. 3. See Figure 2 and Table 2. Slide longer capscrew (3) through the front rod end of new shifter rod (1). Place rod on the outside of the lever assembly. Thread capscrew (3) into the lever assembly. 4. Slide shorter capscrew (2) through the rear rod end of new shifter rod (1). Place rod on the outside of the transmission shift lever. Thread capscrew (2) into the transmission shift lever. 5. Tighten capscrews to 10-15 ft-lbs (13.6-20.3 N-m) . 6. Firmly tighten the lock nuts (5) against the rod ends to 20- 24 ft-lbs (27.1-32.5 Nm) . 1 4 2 4 3 is05394 1. Lever assembly 2. Shifter rod 3. Transmission shift lever 4. Capscrew Figure 1. Shift Linkage Components

BMW R 1200 C And R 850 C REPAIR MANUAL

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 22-11-2010

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BMW Inspection 1000 km/600 miles I -BMW Service II -BMW Inspection III -BMW Annual Service IV Reading out MoDiTeC fault memory (Inspections I, II, III and IV) • Remove the left air cleaner trim panel. • Connect MoDiTeC to diagnostic plug. • Read out the fault memory. • Perform any repair work indicated. Checking throttle cable play, adjusting if necessary (Inspections I and III) • Check throttle cable for free movement and freedom from abrasion or kinking; renew if neces- sary. • With the steering turned to various angles, open the throttle twistgrip fully and allow it to close again. • When released, the twistgrip must return to the closed position by itself. • Pull back the protective cap. • Preset throttle cable play with the engine cold to 1.5 mm (0.06 in). • Warm the engine up to its regular operating tem- perature. • Adjust throttle cable play to 0.5mm (0.02 in) Changing engine oil, renew oil filter element (Inspections I, II, III and IV) L Note: If the motorcycle is ridden only for short distances or outside temperatures are below 0°C (32°F): change the oil and renew the oil filter element every 3 months, but at least every 3 000 km (1 800 miles). • Change the oil while it is at regular operating temperature. • Remove screw plug. • Unscrew oil drain plug and drain off oil. • Fit new seal and screw in drain plug. • Use oil filter wrench, BMW No. 11 4 650 , to unscrew and remove the oil filter. • Coat sealing ring on new oil filter element with oil and screw in. • Add oil. • Insert and tighten the screw plug. • Check engine oil level with the motorcycle in a horizontal position; use the auxiliary stand, BMW No. 001550 . e Caution: Never add engine oil above the MAX mark. X Tightening torque: Oil filter………………………………………………… 11 Nm Oil drain plug………………………………………… 32 Nm Fill quantity for engine: With oil filter change.. 3.75 l (6.6 Imp. pints/3.96 US quarts) Without oil filter change.. 3.50 l (6.2 Imp. pints/3.69 US quarts) Oil volume between MIN and MAX marks……0.50 l (0.88 Imp. pint/0.52 US quart) Engine oil grade: Brand-name HD oil for four-stroke spark-ignition engine, API classifications SE, SF, SG; combination with CC or CD specification

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Suspension Basics for BMW Motorcycles

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 30-11-2010

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tires: Tires are the first part of any suspension system. The design of the tire and even the pressure you run can have a profound affect on the way your motorcycle handles. Stiff, low profile tires will give a sharper feel to the bike, as will higher tire pressures. Those of us who ride our GS’s off the road will decrease the tire pressure to about 50% of the street spec when we are in the dirt. The tire then becomes a very active part of the suspension, but will wallow like an old pig if not re-inflated when pressed back into pavement duty. It still surprises me when we have a customer complain that his BMW needs new shocks when they come in with nearly flat tires. It is possible that the best dollars-per- unit improvement you can make to your BMW may be in keeping the tires inflated. Chassis: There is not much that we can do about the chassis design, unless we are Troy the Welder, but it is a fact that different frames and swing arms flex differently and therefore are part of the suspension. On the Airheads, we often braced various parts of the frame and swing arms, resulting in improved handling that even mere mortals could appreciate. On the latest BMW’s it would take the likes of a Valentino Rossi to even notice if the parts were stiffened. Stiffer is not always better. One of the Japanese racing bike manufactures controls the stiffness of the frame in various areas to allow some flex for better handling. So, Mr. Rossi might not even like it if Troy stiffened his new BMW. Springs: Springs control the ride height of the motorcycle and the ability to allow for different loads. On most BMW’s there is a way to adjust the spring preload to some extent so that the ride can be optimized for a light rider or two-up operation with luggage. Dampers: Dampers control the speed and frequency at which the suspension operates by changing the kinetic (moving) energy to thermal (heat) energy. Without the damper, the suspension would oscillate as each movement occurred, resulting in decreased vehicle control. Dampers on BMW’s fall into two main groups. On airheads, older K bikes, F and G models, and the R1200 HP-2, the front dampers are integrated into the forks. On the rear of the above mentioned -3 – models, and on both ends of all the rest of the bikes, there is a more common shock absorber, around which the spring is located. The HP-2 uses an air spring and air dampened rear shock. Seat: OK, folks, this is here for my old buddy Jeff. We know that a seat isn’t part of suspension, but a bad one sure can make you miserable. We have sent dozens of seats to our friend Mike Harris for inexpensive mods that might improve your riding enjoyment more than any suspension changes you could make! Let us know if we can help you with this most important item

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