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Harley Davidson Softails Airtail Suspension System Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 30-11-2010

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Step 1: Set the Bottoming Control This is the most important step and needs to be done first. Ideally, with the rear wheel off the ground take a measurement from the axle straight up to a fixed point on the fender (assuming the fender is mounted on the frame and not the swingarm). Then, with the motorcycle back on the ground and the rider on it, pressurize the “Bottoming Control” chamber until you get the same measurement —less 1 ¼ to 1 ½”. For example, if your first measurement was 10.0″ inches then your ending measurement should be between 8.50″ and 8.75″ inches. The difference between the two measurements is referred to as “sag”, and it should equal approximately one third of your total wheel travel (see figure 3). Another method of achieving the proper sag is it start with the bike on the ground — with no rider or load on it. Pressurize the “Bottoming Control” chamber to the highest pressure you can without exceeding 150 psi. At this point the rear wheel should be “topped out” and you need to measure from the axle straight up to a fixed point on the fender as described above. Take the same measurement with rider(s) on the bike — ready to ride. The second measurement should be 1¼” to 1½ ” less than the first. If it isn’t, then bleed off the pressure in the “Bottoming Control” chamber until the proper sag is achieved. If you intend to ride the bike at this “full height” then make sure you still put about 10 psi into the “Ride Height” chamber anyway. This helps the piston that separates the two chambers to move more freely producing a smoother ride. Step 2: Set the Ride Height After you have set the “Bottoming Control” you can now adjust the “Ride Height” chamber. This is a much simpler and less crucial adjustment to make. Simply pressurize the “Ride Height” chamber until the bike is lowered to the desired height. To raise the ride height back up, release pressure in the “Ride Height” chamber. Remember, the pressure in this chamber “holds” the bike down—the more pressure the lower it goes. Though the bike may feel “stiffer” the lower you go, do NOT re-adjust the “Bottoming Control” chamber. Essentially what’s happening here is as you’ve reduced your wheel travel, you’ve proportionally increased the forces that keep you from bottoming out with what wheel travel you have left. If you do need to re-adjust the “Bottoming Control” due the addition (or subtraction) of a passenger or extra load, release the pressure from the “Ride Height” chamber first, then repeat step 1.

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Adjusting the Pekar K68 for Dnepr or Ural

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 11-11-2010

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1. Make sure the ignition timing is correct 2. Adjust the valves as necessary to ensure proper operation 3. Run the engine to warm it up a bit 4. Adjust the float setting. To do this, remove the carburetors (leave the throttle cables attached), remove the bowl and turn the carburetor upside down (fuel will spill). The float should look like this: Adjust as necessary by bending the float support (#37 in Figure 1). Reinstall Installation and idle adjustment 1. First you must adjust the idle. It is acceptable per the manual to adjust the idle by using the idle adjust screws (11). This usually involves screwing them then backing out 1 to 1.5 turns. Or you can adjust looking at the sliders 2. If installing the carburetors: a. Remove the cover (2) b. Reomve the slider (3) c. Place the throttle cable through the guide (18) with the spring (4) on the cable. d. Route the cable through the slide catch (6) e. Insert the slide assembly into the chamber and make sure it easily slides up and down. Direct the needle (8) into the opening of the diffuser (angled side visible). f. Screw assembly together and verify via throttle movement that slide moves freely. Attach fuel delivery lines to (12). 3. Using the idle set screw (11) raise the slider so the lower edge is 1-2 mm. 4. Assemble to engine using the proper gaskets (paper – felt – paper). 5. Using the locknut (26) adjust the free play of the throttle cable (2-3 mm) 6. Adjust the idle mixture screw – turn in completely then out 1 to 1.5 turns. * Starting using the K68′s (cold weather) 1. Verify fuel flow. Apply choke (pull 52 in Fig1). 2. Using the ticklers (13) allow fuel to enter the bowl until fuel drains from (14) 3. With the ignition off, kick 1 or 2 times 4. Turn ignition on, and as soon as engine is warmed up (maybe sooner) push choke mechanisms to open choke Idle Adjustment (engine running and warm) 1. Remove one of the spark plug caps, and with the cap shorted, adjust (11) to decrease RPM’s to a point of being minimally steady. 2. Adjust the mixture (15) out until RPM’s decrease. Turn in until RPM’s increase slightly. Then turn in screws ¼ to 1/3 revoultion. 3. Do the same for the second carburetor with the first spark plug cap shorted. 4. With both cylinders, adjust each idle (11) on each carburetor the same amount each until it’s at a steady, minimal RPM. Use small changes. (at this point you can use your airflow tool to check). 5. Sharply increase, then decrease throttle. Then engine must return to low RPMs smoothly. If the engine goes below limits, readjust (11) from step 4. Synchronization of the K68 Note: Rather than using the opposite cylinder shorted to test the pull of the live cylinder carburetor, you can use something like a Twinmax connected to the test ports (27 Fig 1). Or, if you have a model without these ports, use a Synchrometer (Appendix 2) held against the face of the carburetor. These tools merely show airflow passing through each carburetor (which is dependent on the position and wear on the slide). If using these tools, it’s not necessary to do the following steps. You wil want to use a throttle guide (Appendix 1), to show airflow at various throttle settings. Using the flow meter of your choice make sure each carburetor is the same at the various throttle settings. 1. Place the motorcycle on the center stand ensuring the rear wheel is suspended 2. Make sure you have large area to work with (safety issues here) 3. Shift into the highest gear with the engine running 4. Short one spark plug cap to the cylinder (using a nail or something in the fins) 5. Increase the speed to 40-50 km/hr 6. Fix the throttle using the throttle (maybe using a throttle stop screw under the throttle housing). 7. Reconnect other cylinder and using the opposite carburetor determine the speed which should be the same as the first. 8. Adjust the position of this slide to achieve the referenced speed using the locknut at the top of the carburetor.

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KAWASAKI TERYX EFI Installation Instructions.

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 08-02-2011

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Basic Tuning Adjustments 1. The following instructions are for basic fuel tuning. Modes 1,2, & 3 are allowing adjustments to increase and decrease the amount of fuel the engine needs. Modes 4 & 5 are for advanced tuning only. DO NOT change modes 4 & 5 when doing basic tuning! 2. To help understand how these modes work, you can think of them as if you were working with a carburetor. 3. Remember each time you push the MODE button you will be advancing to the next mode. Push the MODE button once and you are now in mode 1, push the MODE button again and you are now in mode 2 and so on. You only need to be concerned with modes 1, 2 & 3 for basic tuning. Modes 4 & 5 are for advanced tuning ONLY. 4. If you need to go back to the settings that were pre programmed when you purchased the controller, just look at the picture in each mode, the colored square represents where the settings were when you purchased the controller. 5. Looking at the controller you will see eight lights with numbers under them, this is what you need to look at when changing settings. The #1 light on the controller represents the leanest setting. TRINITY RACING DOES NOT TAKE REPONSIBLITY FOR DAMAGES THAT MAY OCCUR DURING OPERATION OF YOUR VEHICLE UNDER IMPROPER JET SETTINGS. IT IS THE FINAL RESPONSIBLITY OF THE OWNER/RIDER TO ADJUST JETTING TO SPECIFIC RIDING CONDITIONS AND ELEVATION BEFORE RIDING. WARNING! 1.877.FAS TOYS 2.Remove both seats 6. Re-install engine cover and seats. 6. Mode 1 green light represents idle & cruise adjustment (i.e. pilot jet). To adjust this setting push the MODE button once and then push the plus or minus buttons to adjust fuel as needed. 7. Mode 2 yellow light represents an additional amount of fuel added during acceleration (i.e. needle position). To adjust this setting, push MODE twice and then push the plus or minus buttons to adjust fuel as needed. 12 34 56 7 8 12 34 56 7 8 8. Mode 3 red light represents more fuel being added during full throttle (i.e. main jet). To adjust this setting push the MODE button three times and then push the plus or minus buttons to adjust fuel as needed. 9. If you are confident about your tuning skills and feel you need to adjust other parameters, see Advanced Tuning. 12 34 56 7 8 Advanced Tuning Adjustments 1. Advance tuning has two modes in which to adjust. They are called mode 4 and mode 5. In basic tuning, you are changing the amount of fuel that the engine receives, but with advance tuning, you will be changing when the fuel will be available. In each mode you can adjust how soon the fuel delivery occurs. 2. Mode 4 yellow light and blue light represent when the fuel delivery is available during partial throttle acceleration. To adjust this setting, push the MODE button four times and then push the plus or minus buttons to adjust fuel as needed. Only the yellow light will be changing.

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Ural carburetors Installation and idle adjustment

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Filed Under (Ural) by admin on 02-11-2010

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1. First you must adjust the idle. It is acceptable per the manual to adjust the idle by using the idle adjust screws (11). This usually involves screwing them then backing out 1 to 1.5 turns. Or you can adjust looking at the sliders 2. If installing the carburetors: a. Remove the cover (2) b. Reomve the slider (3) c. Place the throttle cable through the guide (18) with the spring (4) on the cable. d. Route the cable through the slide catch (6) e. Insert the slide assembly into the chamber and make sure it easily slides up and down. Direct the needle (8) into the opening of the diffuser (angled side visible). f. Screw assembly together and verify via throttle movement that slide moves freely. Attach fuel delivery lines to (12). 3. Using the idle set screw (11) raise the slider so the lower edge is 1-2 mm. 4. Assemble to engine using the proper gaskets (paper – felt – paper). 5. Using the locknut (26) adjust the free play of the throttle cable (2-3 mm) 6. Adjust the idle mixture screw – turn in completely then out 1 to 1.5 turns 1. Remove one of the spark plug caps, and with the cap shorted, adjust (11) to decrease RPM’s to a point of being minimally steady. 2. Adjust the mixture (15) out until RPM’s decrease. Turn in until RPM’s increase slightly. Then turn in screws ¼ to 1/3 revoultion. 3. Do the same for the second carburetor with the first spark plug cap shorted. 4. With both cylinders, adjust each idle (11) on each carburetor the same amount each until it’s at a steady, minimal RPM. Use small changes. (at this point you can use your airflow tool to check). 5. Sharply increase, then decrease throttle. Then engine must return to low RPMs smoothly. If the engine goes below limits, readjust (11) from step 4. Synchronization of the K68 Note: Rather than using the opposite cylinder shorted to test the pull of the live cylinder carburetor, you can use something like a Twinmax connected to the test ports (27 Fig 1). Or, if you have a model without these ports, use a Synchrometer (Appendix 2) held against the face of the carburetor. These tools merely show airflow passing through each carburetor (which is dependent on the position and wear on the slide). If using these tools, it’s not necessary to do the following steps. You wil want to use a throttle guide (Appendix 1), to show airflow at various throttle settings. Using the flow meter of your choice make sure each carburetor is the same at the various throttle settings. 1. Place the motorcycle on the center stand ensuring the rear wheel is suspended 2. Make sure you have large area to work with (safety issues here) 3. Shift into the highest gear with the engine running 4. Short one spark plug cap to the cylinder (using a nail or something in the fins) 5. Increase the speed to 40-50 km/hr 6. Fix the throttle using the throttle (maybe using a throttle stop screw under the throttle housing). 7. Reconnect other cylinder and using the opposite carburetor determine the speed which should be the same as the first. 8. Adjust the position of this slide to achieve the referenced speed using the locknut at the top of the carburetor.

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ATK 50MX INSTALLATION AND ADJUSTMENT TIPS

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Filed Under (Atk) by admin on 01-11-2010

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PRELOAD ADJUSTMENT— On some Works shocks a threaded preload is standard. This allows the adjustment of the ride height of the motorcycle. The preload is changed by turning a threaded nut down towards the spring (higher ride height) or up away from the spring (lower ride height). The nut is a right-hand thread. CHECKING RIDE HEIGHT— 1. With the bike unloaded on the side stand and the shock fully extended, have an assistant measure from a point at the axle (center point) to a point on the frame, fender or bodywork directly above it. Record this measurement. 2. With the bike off the stand and the rider in the seat, bounce on the suspension and let the bike settle. Have the assistant measure from the same two points. Subtract the second measurement from the first. HM CRX50 / BAJA & ATK 50MX INSTALLATION AND ADJUSTMENT TIPS Continued on next page. #HM50 – 5/27/99 #HM50 – 5/27/99 To Front Valve Mounting channel Spacer Flange Shock eye Top View of Shock Mount Fig. 1 Top view of upper shock mount. The flange on the shock bushing must face toward the spacer. The valve should point toward the front of the bike Fig. 1 Top view of upper shock mount. The flange on the shock bushing must face toward the spacer. The valve should point toward the front of the bike 3. The amount of settle, or “sag” is a function of the wheel travel. It should only be between 1/4 and 1/3 of the total travel. 4. If the difference is less than the minimum, reduce the spring preload. Measure the distance again starting with Step 2. Adjust again if necessary. 5. If the difference is more than the maximum, increase the spring preload. Measure the distance again starting with Step 2. Adjust again if necessary. Note: If the ride height is too low, the shock will bottom unnecessarily, resulting in a harsh ride. If the ride height is too high, the shock will “top out” too easily when rebounding from a bump or under hard deceleration. NITROGEN PRESSURES IN EMULSION SHOCKS CAUTION: The pressure in these shocks cannot successfully be checked. Concerns with the gauge volume and the gas volume in the shock body create a situation where you cannot accurately determine what pressure was in the shock. In addition when the pressure is lowered (i.e. checking the pressure) the gas and some of the shock oil escapes into the gauge. It is possible to lose a large percentage of the shock oil by depressing the core of a charged shock to the atmosphere. Please note that in order to check the pressure, some of the gas must escape and fill the gauge assembly. The volume of the gas pocket is about half the size of your thumb, so a very small volume change results in a large pressure drop. Because the gauges’ volumes vary, it is not possible to deduce the actual pressure in the shock prior to attaching the gauge. Therefore it is imperative that any attempt to check pressure be accompanied by the capability of refilling the shock. In other words: If you don’t have a nitrogen source handy, don’t check the pressure! PRESSURIZING EMULSION SHOCKS The pressure setting for Works gas shocks is 250 p.s.i. of dry nitrogen. To pressurize a shock with some residual pressure in it, bring the gauge manifold up to 250 p.s.i. and depress the core with the T-handle. This will either equalize the pressure or refill the shock without transferring oil from the shock into the gauge assembly. The best gauges for this purpose screw on to the valve and incorporate a T-handled core depressor to isolate the shock from the gauge. This allows a leak-free separation once the desired pressure is reached. For simplified operation, an extra valve is provided for the filling apparatus, allowing pressure adjustment with the gauge in place. Works offers a suitable gauge and filling manifold. Most motorcycle shops that deal with dirt bikes can pressurize the shock

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Kawasaki FI Calibration Tool Instruction Manual

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 08-02-2011

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System Function Kawasaki FI Calibration Tool (FI Tool) is developed to modify the mapping of the racing machine to gain operating conditions suitable for the course and the rider’s skill. The following are the available setting functions. Table 1 FI Tool Function Model Name Functions Available Setting Range ’04 ZX-10R ’05 ZX-6RR ’05 ZX-10R ’06 ZX-10R ’07 ZX-6R 1) Adjust the injected fuel rate at acceleration -30 % ~ +30 % 〇 〇 〇 〇 〇 2) Adjust the injected fuel rate of No.1 and No.4 cylinder -30 % ~ +30 % 〇 〇 〇 〇 〇 3) Adjust the injected fuel rate of No.2 and No.3 cylinder -30 % ~ +30 % 〇 〇 〇 〇 〇 4) Adjust the injected fuel rate of primary and secondary injector * -30 % ~ +30 % -10 % ~ +10 % — – — 〇 — – — – — 〇 5) Adjust the ignition timing -15°CA~ +5°CA 〇 〇 〇 〇 〇 6) Adjust the sub-throttle opening angle -50 % ~ +50 % -45 % ~ +45 % 〇 — – 〇 〇 — 〇 — – 〇 7) Adjust the exhaust device opening angle -50 % ~ +50 % 〇 — 〇 〇 — 8) Adjust the all injected fuel rates of all cylinders and operating are a simultaneously -30 % ~ +30 % 〇 〇 〇 〇 〇 9) Adjust the value of engine over revolution limiter 0 ~ +300 rpm -1000 ~ +700rpm -1000 ~+1200rpm — – — 〇 — – — 〇 — – — 〇 〇 — – 10) Set the fuel cut or not at deceleration Use or Not Use 〇 〇 〇 〇 〇 11) Set the sub throttle controlled or not Controlled or Full Open Fixed 〇 — – — – 12) Set the exhaust device controlled or not Controlled or Full Open Fixed 〇 〇 〇 〇 〇 13) Set the Auto Shifter Ignition Cut Length Controlled or not, set Ig. Cut Time by gear range — – 〇 〇 〇 14) Set the Pit Road RPM Limit Controlled or not, set Upper Limit RPM by gear range

2006 King Cobra Service Procedure

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Filed Under (Cobra) by admin on 10-11-2010

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Cobra CX50 SR is a close-tolerance high performance machine and break- in time is very important for maximum life and performance. The CX50 SR can be ridden hard after the first ½ hour break-in time but it is recommended that no adjustments are made to the carburetion or suspension until the full 8 hours of bike break-in has elapsed. Also, after the engine, transmission, and drive train have been broken-in for the full 8 hours, the bike will be faster! Use a fuel / oil mixture of 32:1 for the full 8 hour break-in period. Be sure to use high-octane pump gas, with Cobra’s specially formulated Cobra Venom 2-cycle Race Oil . (Part # MCMUOL02) CAUTION: Failure to use proper fuel, oil, or fuel/oil mixture may result in premature engine wear or damage to the machine. Adhering to the following break-in schedule will result in long lasting high performance machine. • Start bike on stand • First 5 minute period, operate the bike on the stand with a combination of idle and high RPM operation. (avoid prolonged high RPM but spin the rear wheel good at least once or twice per minute) • Allow bike to cool • Ride for 15 minutes maximum (avoid prolonged high RPM operation and avoid abusing the clutch with throttle blipping. • Cool and inspect bike for loose fasteners. • Next ½ hour of operation, avoid prolonged operation at Wide Open Throttle. • After 1 hour of operation o Check for loose bolts and nuts on the bike and retighten as necessary (proper toque values are listed under Specifications). o Clean the carburetor bowl. o Change the transmission / clutch lubricant. • After 8 hours of operation o Change the fork oil. o Have a Certified Cobra Mechanic change the shock oil. • Your bike is now ready for the highest level of competition! NOTE: During break-in the bike will likely lose some engine coolant through the radiator overflow hose. Losing up to 4 oz (120 ml, ½ cup) is normal. Proper coolant level will cover the top of the radiator cores. Removing the radiator cap and looking inside is the only way to check the coolant level. 8
Never open the radiator cap of a machine that has a hot or warm engine or one that has recently been ridden. Burning and scalding could occur. CAUTION: It is important that the radiator cap is installed correctly and completely otherwise engine damage could occur. Starting Procedure Before starting the machine inspect the following: • Check for proper tire pressure in both tires. • Observe the chain tension and adjust if necessary. • Observe the coolant level and fill if necessary. • Verify that the chain rollers and sliders do not have improper wear. • Verify that the handlebars are tight. • Check the throttle for smooth operation and that it ‘clacks’ shut properly. • Check for loose bolts and nuts, and re-torque as necessary. • Verify that the air filter is clean and properly saturated with oil. • Insure that the fuel tank contains an adequate volume of fuel / oil mixture to complete the distance required. (High octane pump gas with Cobra’s specially formulated Cobra Venom 2-cycle Race Oil ) • Turn the fuel on by rotating the fuel petcock knob to the vertically downward position (reserve position is horizontally forward) CAUTION: For best results from your Cobra Motorcycle use only the recommended fuels. Testing has shown that most ‘race’ fuels actually degrade performance. Always wear a helmet and other protective riding gear. When your pre-ride inspection is complete the bike may be started. For a cold engine follow this procedure. 1. Place the motorcycle on a stand of sufficient strength that positions the motorcycle in a level upright position with the rear wheel off the ground. 2. Pull up the choke knob and turn it to lock it. 3. Kick start the engine. 4. Rev the engine in short spurts, turning the throttle no more than 1/4 open until the engine will run without the choke.

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HONDA CT110 OWNERS MANUAL

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 22-04-2011

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ENGINE OIL Engine Oil Level Check Check the engine oil level each day before riding the motorcycle. The level must be maintained between the upper (2) and lower (3) marks on the dipstick (1). 1. Start the engine and let it idle for a few minutes. 2. Stop the engine and hold the motorcycle in an upright position on firm, level ground. 3. After a few minutes, remove the oil filler cap/dipstick, wipe it clean, and reinsert the dipstick without screwing it in. The oil level should be between the upper and lower marks on the dipstick. 4. If required, add the specified oil up to the upper level mark. Do not overfill. 5. Reinstall the oil filler cap/dipstick, check for oil leaks. CAUTION Running the engine with insufficient oil can cause serious engine damage. TYRES Proper air pressure will provide maximum stability, riding comfort and tire life. Check tire pressure frequently and adjust if necessary. NOTE Tire pressure should be checked before you ride while the tyres are cold. Select the right replacement tire in accordance with the following specifications: Cold tire pressures kPa ( kg/cm2, psi ) Front: 175 ( 1.75, 25 ) Rear : 225 ( 2.25, 33 ) Tire size Front: 2.75 – 17 41P Rear : 2.75 – 17 41P Check the tires for cuts, embedded nails, ore other sharp objects. See your authorized Honda Dealer for replacement of damaged tires or punctured inner tubes OPERATION PRE-RIDE INSPECTION WARNING If the Pre-ride Inspection is not performed, serious damage or an accident may result. Inspect your motorcycle very day before you ride it. The items listed here will only take a few minutes to check, and in the long run they can save time, expense and possibly you life. 1. Engine oil level – add engine oil if required. Check for leaks. 2. Fuel level – fill the fuel tank when necessary. Check for leaks. 3. Brakes – check operation. Adjust free play if necessary. 4. Tyres – check condition and pressure. 5. Drive chain – check condition and slack. Adjust and lubricate if necessary. 6. Throttle – check for smooth opening and full closing in all steering positions. 7. Lights – check that headlight, tail/brake light, turn signals, indicators. 8. Engine stop switch – check for proper function. 9. Battery electrolyte – check the level and add if necessary Correct any discrepancy before you ride. Contact your authorized Honda dealer for assistance if you cannot correct the proble

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POLINI X1 GENERAL INFORMATION AND SPECIFICATIONS

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Filed Under (Polini) by admin on 02-12-2010

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Air cleaner – Clean and reoil daily or after each moto to prevent motor failure and reduced performance. Transmission oil – change after every race, or at end of riding day. Chain – check tension and lubricate before every ride, adjust or replace as needed. Reoil after riding in damp conditions. Clutch – disassemble and clean clutch assembly frequently, every 2-3 races at least. Inspect kickstarter gears at this time. Ignition cover – remove cover and wipe dry after each ride or after washing bike to remove condensation. Piston rings – replace as often as every 3-5 races with expert rider, less often with less aggressive riders. Piston, pin, rod bearing & circlips – replace as often as every 8-10 races with expert rider, less often with less aggressive riders. Coolant – change yearly, make sure there is at least a 50/50 mixture of antifreeze if freezing temperatures are possible. Steering bearings – Check daily for looseness or play. Adjust and regrease as needed. Swingarm – Check often for looseness. Regrease several times a year. Replace bushings if any play is evident. Sprockets – check for worn or curved teeth each time chain is adjusted. Chain roller& wear pads – check roller for free rotation when checking chain. Make sure roller is not bent or damaged. Check chain wear strips on swingarm and chain guide frequently. Replace as needed to prevent chain from damaging motorcycle. Spokes – Check after each race or after each day of riding for looseness or damage. Wheels & tires – check wheels after each race for dents, cracks or other damage. Check tires for cuts, damage or wear. Check tire pressure daily and adjust for riding conditions. Shock – Check shaft area daily for signs of oil leakage or damage. Check swingarm and shock bushings for looseness. Forks – Check forks daily for leaking oil or damage to tubes. Make sure forks are not twisted check for smooth operation. Spark plug – check sparkplug color and condition after each race or end of riding day. Adjust jetting to keep plug from fouling or overheating. Silencer – If bike seems to be getting louder, replace packing and decarbonize inner tube. Expansion pipe – check daily for large dents, damage or leakage. Remove carbon from headpipe when pipe is removed. Have large dents fixed, or any dents within 8″ of the cylinder. Replace o-rings on pipe as needed to maintain a good seal. Footpegs – check daily for proper operation, pegs should spring back into place. Make sure pegs are not bent or overly dull. Handlebars – check bars after any crash for bending. Look for cracks near bar clamps. Replace bars that have been straightened more than 2 or three times, or if bar is badly bent. Aweakened bar can snap suddenly causing injury to rider. Throttle – check throttle for proper operation each time before bike is started. Remove and clean inside of grip and bar as needed. Grips – check grips daily for wear or looseness. Replace as needed. Use grip glue & safety wire to help hold grips in position. Calipers & pads – check pad wear and caliper function daily or after each race. Replace pads and clean calipers as needed. Brake lever – check lever daily for damage or wear. Make sure lever is at proper angle for both seated and standing positions. Leave lever clamp loose enough to allow clamp to rotate during crash rather than breaking lever. Check and adjust freeplay as needed. Brake pedal – Check pedal daily for damage and proper freeplay. Adjust rear caliper as needed. Reeds – Remove and inspect reed block during every ring change. Check reeds for signs of wear, fraying and cracking. Make sure reeds sit flat and seal well. Replace at any sign of wear or damage or at least once a year, more often for expert riders. Nuts & bolts – Check all nuts and bolts regularly. Make sure to check engine mounting bolts and swingarm bolt frequently

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2004 – 2006 4Runner TIRE PRESSURE SENSING TRANSMITTER ACTIVATION PROCEDURE DURING PDS

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Filed Under (Toyota Manuals) by admin on 29-10-2011

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pressure data is transmitted through a Tire Pressure Warning System antenna to the Tire Pressure Monitoring System receiver. The tire pressure sensing transmitter used for the Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) on 2004 – 2006 model year 4Runner vehicles needs to be activated during Pre-Delivery Service (PDS). 2004 – 2006 model year 4Runner vehicles. NOTE: After all the tire pressure sensing transmitters are activated, the flashing Low Tire Pressure Warning Light goes OFF. The Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) listed below may be stored in the system until the tire pressure sensing transmitters are activated. The codes will automatically clear when the tire pressure sensing transmitters are activated

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