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Aprilia Falco Synchronizing the Cylinder Vacuum

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Filed Under (Aprilia) by admin on 26-10-2010

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Motorcycle cylinders work quite independently compared to automobiles. Separate carburation, intake manifolds, exhaust pipes and sometimes even independent air filters allow the cylinders to be tuned so that one may be making more power than another. This can be due to differences in air flow, temperature, injection, or valve adjustment betwen the cylinders. Periodically, the cylinders should be synchronized. This is usually done by comparing intake manifold vacuum beneath each throttle and trimming the mixture until balanced. Some old-timers will tell you it can be done by ear, listening to the air flow in each carb throat through a tube stuck in your ear. Most modern tuners have switched to mercury sticks. Rigid tubes stuck in a bath of mercury are attached to the vacuum source. The vacuum draws the mercury up the sticks in proportion to pressure difference between the manifold and the atmosphere. In order to smooth out the individual vacuum pulses, a damping device is needed. This is nothing more than a small orifice (pin hole) restriction in the lines, placed close to the manifold with an air reservoir (length of tube) behind it. Because there is no real air flow in the gauges, there is no pressure drop across the orifice. But when the manifold vacuum drops there is a delay before the gauge pressure can bleed off and it appears steady and readable. Other types of vacuum gauges include mercury-less versions (that draw metal rods), or traditional needle, or “clock” gauges. The clock gauges are very fast acting (they are designed that way so you can see engine problems such as sticking valves). You will definitely need a damper if you choose a clock gauge. I would recommend using two side by side gauges for checking cylinder synch. The reason is, the cylinders are not perfectly independent. As one cylinder drops strength, the idle drops, and this will change the vacuum in the second cylinder’s manifold. It takes a bit of fooling around to get a cause-and-effect feel when you are turning the screws. Swapping gauges would make this difficult

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BMW K1100LT Installing Real Cruise Control

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 26-10-2010

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The vacuum reserve canister (VRC) is used to provide adequate vacuum for the cruise control servo unit. It uses the throttle body as a vacuum source and, via the vacuum check valve, stores up vacuum for the servo to use to pull the throttle cable. You can also buy one of these at an auto parts store for about $10-15 but I decided to build my own so I could make one that would fit inside the left front of the main fairing body. If you decide to buy one, make sure you can return it if it doesn’t fit inside the fairing or be prepared to mount it somewhere else like inside the tail cowl. I used 8″ of 2″ diameter PVC tubing because that is the length that would easily fit inside the fairing It is mounted inside the fairing in front of the left “bucket.” I used white PVC tubing but, in hindsight, would use black if possible since it is visible to the rider when mounted in the fairing. I suspect that the cruise control may actually work without the use of the vacuum canister so you might want to try the cruise without a VRC. If you do install the cruise control without a VRC, you’ll want to put a vacuum check valve in the vacuum hose that goes from the throttle body to the cruise control servo unit.
11/30/2005 08:23 PM Installing Real Cruise Control on a BMW K1100 Page 4 of 8 used epoxy for assembling the VRC as it’s my permanent adhesive of choice. Cut an 8″ length of 2″ diameter PVC tubing. Sand the edges. Drill two holes as shown for the check valve and vacuum tee. There’s a vacuum tee in the bags of installation miscellany that come with the cruise control. File the webbing from the right angles before gluing it and the check valve in place. Remember to glue the tee into place before gluing the end caps on. Make sure everything has an airtight seal. I used zip-ties to hold it in place inside the main fairing body in front of the left bucket

Aprilia – General Scottoiler Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Aprilia) by admin on 26-10-2010

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The vacuum connection is the same for the Aprilia RST Futura & Capo Nord models. On the left hand side of the bike (sitting on the bike) are two pipes from the airbox. Cut into one of these pipes & insert the special T-Piece (not included in the Mk 7 kit), as shown left. Then press the Damper Elbow, part number 4 from the Scottoiler kit, onto the third leg of the tee. The vacuum connection on the RSV Mille and Falco models is different from above. For 1998 models, underneath the tank is a vacuum pipe, as shown left. Cut into this pipe, and insert the special T-Piece (not included in the Mk 7 kit). Push the Damper Elbow, part number 4, onto the third leg of the tee. Vacuum connection for 2000 models, there is a rubber bung over a spigot on the inlet tract, as shown left. Remove the rubber bung and replace it with the Damper Elbow, part number 4 from the Scottoiler kit, as shown below. You may need to gently heat the Damper Elbow ease fitting it onto the spigot. Once you’ve fitted part number 4, push the vacuum tubing into the end of the Damper Elbow and route neatly along the bike towards the RMV position, as shown later in this document. The picture on the left shows the vacuum connection on later models of Aprilia Mille, 2004 onwards. Cut the tube shown, and insert the standard tee piece from the Scottoiler kit. Push the vacuum damper elbow, part number 4, onto the third leg of the tee piece, and fit the vacuum tubing into the damper elbow by pushing in securely. Route vacuum tubing along bike to RMV position

HI-4 DUAL FIRE MOTORCYCLE IGNITION INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 09-11-2010

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Turn ignition switch off and disconnect battery ground cable. 2. Refer to Figure 3. Remove OE ignition module and wire harness (items 1-4). You will disconnect two wires at the coil (15), a wire going to the VOES (Vacuum Operated Electrical Switch) (18), a black ground wire at the ignition module, and the 3 pin plug (20) that connects to the sensor plate (11). Refer to shop manual for locations. 3. Remove ignition cover plates and gasket (items 5- 9). This will require drilling out two rivets. The rivets will later be replaced with two supplied self- threading screws. 4. In order to remove the sensor plate cable, the cable plug (20) must be removed first. Use needle nose pliers to pull the terminals out of the plug. Then pull the cable through the exit hole at the bottom of the timing cover. 5. Note location of sensor plate (11). There is a V notch in the sensor plate used for alignment. When you install the HI-4, you should align the V notch in the same location. This should set the timing close enough to start the engine. Remove and save the two standoffs and washers (10). Remove the sensor plate (11). HI-4 INSTALLATION Refer to Figure 4. The HI-4 requires use of the OE timing rotor P/N 32402-83 (used only on 1985 and newer models). If you have an older model or are not sure, check the rotor (9) for the correct part number. For models prior to 1980, use the supplied 10-32 x ¾”bolt and washer to mount the rotor. 1. Install the HI-4 system in place of the OE breaker or sensor plate. Rotate the HI-4 about 90 degrees to give better access to the cable exit hole. Install the HI-4 first, then push the cable through the hole. On some early models it may be necessary to enlarge the wire harness exit hole in the gear cover. Align the V notch on the HI-4 same as the OE plate you removed. Use the OE standoffs to secure the HI-4. You must use lockwashers under the standoffs for proper clearance between the HI-4 and cover plate. Do not fully tighten the standoffs until the timing has been set. 2. Route the HI-4 wire harness along the frame rails up to the coil. Make sure that harness will not be chafed or burned by exhaust heat. Secure harness with tie wraps. Do not install timing cover. HI-4 HOOKUP Crimp terminals and hardware are supplied for your convenience. Use the ring terminals for coil hookup. Use male-female quick disconnects for connections to the tach and vacuum switch (VOES). Tape up any unused wires. 1. Circuit Breaker Cover Screws (2) 2. Circuit Breaker Cover 3. Circuit Breaker Cover Gasket 4. Breaker Plate Screws (2) 5. Breaker Plate Screw Lockwashers & Washers (2 each) 6. Retainer (1971 to early 1972) 7. Circuit Breaker Cam Bolt 8. Breaker Plate Assembly 9. Breaker Cam 10. Advance Assembly 11. Gear Case Cover 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 NOTE: Damage will result if the brown tach wire comes in contact with +12V. Figure 1. Harley-Davidson®OE Points System
9000-4002A REV A 3 2/05 1. Identify switched +12 volt wire and tach wire (if equipped) going to the coil. Refer to your service manual, or reconnect the battery and use a test light or voltmeter. The switched +12 volt wire will be hot when the ignition key is turned on. 2. Refer to Figure 5. Connect the HI-4 red wire and switched +12 volt wire to Coil positive. 3. The HI-4 white wire is not used and should be taped. 4. Connect the HI-4 black wire to the Coil negative terminal. 5. Connect the HI-4 green wire to the vacuum switch (Figure 3, item 18), if used. 6. Connect the HI-4 brown wire to the tach wire, if equipped with tach. Tape up if unused. 7. The HI-4 is grounded via the timing housing; a separate ground connection is not required. 8. Reconnect battery ground cable. Verify proper ground connections to the frame and engine. VOES HOOKUP The OE vacuum switch (VOES) is normally an open circuit. Above 3-5 inch-Hg vacuum, the VOES closes and grounds the vacuum input on the OE ignition module. This increases the total advance generated by the OE ignition module. Vacuum advance improves part throttle 17 16 1. Cover Screws (2) 2. Ignition Timer Cover 3. Ignition Module 4. Timer Plate Screws (2) 5. Washers (2) 6. Screws & Washers (2 each) 7. Shield 8. Sensor 9. Trigger Rotor Bolt 10. Timer Plate 11. Trigger Rotor 12. Advance Assembly 13. Gear Case Cover 14. Ignition Coil 15. Spark Plug Wires (2) 16. Ignition Coil Terminal (FX) 17. Ignition Coil Terminal (FL) 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 NOTE: Most motorcycle coils do not have terminals marked. Use either terminal for Coil+ (positive) and the other one for Coil- (negative). Warning: The HI-4 (8-1100) Dual Fire ignition will not work with 2 plugs per head, dual coil application. Damage will result if attempted. Use the HI-4 (8-2100) single fire ignition for 2 plugs per head applications

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Yamaha TDM900 Installing and removal the Vacuum Actuator

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 28-12-2011

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Attach the cable adjuster to the bracket. Position the adjuster so that it is screwed all the way in. Do not tighten the lock nuts on the adjuster yet. • Route the new ‘carburettor’ cable around and out the RHS of the bike under the frame rail as shown in the following photos. Installing the Vacuum Actuator • Mount the actuator on the RHS fairing support using the bracket provided and two bolts, nuts and flat washers. The mounting bracket fits on the inside face of the fairing bracket. The small plate fits on the outside and clamps the actuator to the faring frame.

Triumph Bonneville Tuning Manual

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Filed Under (Triumph) by admin on 20-11-2010

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1. The Float The float bowl acts as a fuel reservoir to meet engine demand. The float is hinged on a pin in the float boss. It rises and falls with the fuel level in the float bowl. The small metal tang integrated in the plastic float supports the float valve, also known as the float needle. As the fuel in the float bowl rises, the float valve is pushed into the valve seat, until it’s high enough to shut off the fuel flow to the bowl. As fuel is used the level in the bowl drops lowering the float which pulls the float valve from its seat, and fills again. Adjusting the height of the float has a big effect on the mixture as a low or high float level makes it harder or easier for the vacuum to suck fuel into the venturi. Differing float levels cause an imbalance which may be perceived as vibration. 2. The Choke This system is referred to as the choke. But that’s a misnomer. When you pull the choke knob, what you’re doing is retracting a plunger that opens a tube connected to the starter jet, allowing additional fuel to enter the venturi just below the vacuum hose nipple. It supplements the pilot system at start up. 3. The Pilot System The primary purpose of the pilot system is to supply the mixture at idle. It continues to supply fuel throughout the entire throttle range, but after about 1/8 throttle is reached the main system starts to put out more of the total mixture, up to full throttle. By adjusting the idle with the big screw on the left side of the carburettors the position of the butterfly is altered, so exposing one or more of the four small holes that are drilled into the venturi, (leading to the pilot jet) just under the butterfly valve, letting more or less air pass the butterfly. Adjusting the pilot screw that’s under the carburettor varies the amount of air premixing with the fuel before it enters the venturi. 4. The Main System Open the throttle and the cable that’s connected to the butterfly valve turns it from vertical to horizontal, so letting more air through the venturi. This increases the vacuum effect that is transferred up through the vacuum drilling in the slide to the diaphragm valve that leads to the diaphragm chamber. The top chamber is separated from the bottom by a rubber diaphragm. The bottom chamber is open to atmospheric pressure from the airbox. When the vacuum in the top chamber rises enough, the constant ambient pressure of the lower chamber helps the diaphragm valve overcome the downward force of the diaphragm spring, so it rises from the ven- turi. As the diaphragm is raised the needle is pulled out of the needle jet, exposing a thinner portion of the needle taper which allows more fuel to rise into the venturi to meet the increased engine demand. The key parts of the main system are shown in the photo below

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Harley-Davidson Vacuum Operated Switch Kit Installation MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 24-03-2012

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1. Turn off the ignition switch and disconnect the battery ground cable before proceeding. 2. For applications with Harley-Davidson OE ignition modules, simply replace the existing OE VOES switch with the new Twin Tec switch. Use the supplied crimp terminals to connect the new switch in place of the old switch. The wiring is not polarity sensitive and the two wires from the new switch can be interchanged. 3. For Twin Tec ignitions, refer to the installation instructions supplied with the ignition module for VOES switch hookup. Use the supplied crimp terminals to connect the new switch. The wiring is not polarity sensitive and the two wires from the new switch can be interchanged. 4. Reconnect the battery ground cable when you have completed the installation

Audiovox CCS-100 Cruise Control Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 10-11-2010

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You can see where I drilled the holes to mount the bracket. (2566, 2567) You’ll have to bend the bracket to fit and reposition it on the servo (the extra holes are already there on the servo to move the bracket). Just bend it until it lays flat on the back of the plastic box. You’ll have to unbolt the two bolts that hold the plastic box in place to work on it. I made the hole in the front of the box (where the servo cable goes through) way too large, but I wasn’t sure what angle it would be at when I installed it, so I kept cutting it bigger so the cable wouldn’t be bent too sharp. (2565) I ran the servo cable along the top frame under the tank, around the front cylinder and into a bracket (that came with the unit) that I cut off to fit. I attached the bracket to the screw on the air cleaner, but you really have to do a lot of grinding on the bracket to get it to fit the area so that it will lay flat and tighten up with the screw. You’ll see what I mean when you put a piece of metal or bracket up to that hole. It’s not flat, so I used a moto-tool to cut slots in the bracket and a grinder to grind it down smaller so that it would fit in that area. I used the long “cable” and no bead chain to connect to the throttle. (2560) First take off your throttle grip and release the “pull” cable (the front one) so you can remove it from the carb lever. Then put the cable end over the throttle cable end and re-insert it, then re-assemble your throttle. Hook the ball on the end of the long cable (there are two or three cables in the kit, use the long one) to one of the bead chain connectors (you have to spread it first) and then close it back up. (2563) Spread the other end and hook it to the servo cable and then using your pliers, close it again. Ok, now you have the servo all hooked up. You’ll need a vacuum canister, which you can buy at JC Whitney, or make one from PCV pipe (2″) with caps. (2554, 2555) Drill two 5/16″ holes in the pipe, tap(1/8″) them and insert brass 3/16″ nipples for your vacuum hose. (2568) Hook the black of the Napa one-way vacuum check valve end up to your engine vacuum and the blue end to your canister. I disconnected the emissions canister from the cylinder number one intake. I then uncapped the vacuum tap on the number two cylinder intake and connected the two together with a “T” (from the kit) and the connected the remaining end of the “T” to the black end of the check valve. (2556) The other nipple on your canister gets connected to the servo (drill a whole in the bottom of the black box to run it in). Wiring: Drill a hole in the top of the black box to run the wiring harness out. I’d suggest you take a roll of electrical tape and tape it up first. Leave the black ground wire out of the tape and also leave the purple and red wires out of the taped area about 8″ or 10″ up from the servo. You’ll want them near the servo so you can cross them over the bike to the right side and hook the black wire directly to the negative side of the battery. The purple wire connects to the yellow brake light wire and the red wire connects to the blue wire, which is hot when the key is on. The rest of the harness you can run along the left side of the frame, using wire tires to tie it off. Leave the blue wire out of the harness as you get to the front cylinder (so you can hook it to the front coil), or you could use the back cylinder coil. You can make a little “Y” harness out of spade connectors (female on one end, and male on the other two ends) to join the blue wire to the coil. Use the gray wire on the front coil or the orange wire on the rear coil

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Toyota 2007- 2010 Camry 2009- 2010 Venza INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Toyota Manuals) by admin on 25-09-2011

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Turn the ignition OFF and disconnect the vehi- cle’s negative battery cable Disconnect the mass sensor electrical connection by depressing the center tab and gently pulling the harness away from the mass air sensor. Release the
two wiring harness clips from the air box lid ently pull the engine cover upward to release it from the mounting grommets. Once released, Re- move engine cover from the vehicle and set aside. 4. Disconnect the vacuum line from the intake mani- fold plenum connection. 5. Disconnect the vacuum line from the upper air box lid. Toyota
2007-10 Camry 2009-10 Venza V6-3.5L 69-8611 7. Disconnect the two vacuum lines from the “Vacuum switching valve.

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Toyota Celica GT 2000- 2003 5 speed and automatic REMOVAL and INSTALLATION

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Filed Under (Toyota Manuals) by admin on 23-09-2011

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Remove the OBD canister, vacuum switching valve and air temperature control sensor from the air box
without removing any vacuum lines. Once all sensors have been removed take out the remaining air box
and air duct leading to the throttle body. Remove the two-piece air duct leading into the black ECU box.
We recommend you remove the front bumper to make the installation easier. The vacuum switching
valve used to control the valves or by-pass flaps in the box will no longer be used. These flaps control the
amount of air taken in when the engine is running. A 3mm cap will cap-off the port at the engine block.
2 Slip the 2 3/4” straight hose over the throttle body and use two clamps. Tighten the clamp on the throttle
body at this point. (See fig. 2) 3 Remove the black relay fuse box from the bracket bolted to the car frame. (See figs. 1) Remove the stock m6 bolt holding the bracket in place and set the OBD canister on top of the bracket. Screw
the stock bolt tight in place securing the OBD canister to the bracket. Take the vibra-mount and screw
it into the tapped hole right above the OBD canister. (See fig. 6) 4 Once the bumper has been removed cut an opening in the lower section of the plastic wheel well as seen in figure 3. A razor or any cutting device will work to make the opening

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