float bowl adjustment motorcycle rm 250 2001

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Triumph Bonneville Tuning Manual

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Filed Under (Triumph) by admin on 20-11-2010

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1. The Float The float bowl acts as a fuel reservoir to meet engine demand. The float is hinged on a pin in the float boss. It rises and falls with the fuel level in the float bowl. The small metal tang integrated in the plastic float supports the float valve, also known as the float needle. As the fuel in the float bowl rises, the float valve is pushed into the valve seat, until it’s high enough to shut off the fuel flow to the bowl. As fuel is used the level in the bowl drops lowering the float which pulls the float valve from its seat, and fills again. Adjusting the height of the float has a big effect on the mixture as a low or high float level makes it harder or easier for the vacuum to suck fuel into the venturi. Differing float levels cause an imbalance which may be perceived as vibration. 2. The Choke This system is referred to as the choke. But that’s a misnomer. When you pull the choke knob, what you’re doing is retracting a plunger that opens a tube connected to the starter jet, allowing additional fuel to enter the venturi just below the vacuum hose nipple. It supplements the pilot system at start up. 3. The Pilot System The primary purpose of the pilot system is to supply the mixture at idle. It continues to supply fuel throughout the entire throttle range, but after about 1/8 throttle is reached the main system starts to put out more of the total mixture, up to full throttle. By adjusting the idle with the big screw on the left side of the carburettors the position of the butterfly is altered, so exposing one or more of the four small holes that are drilled into the venturi, (leading to the pilot jet) just under the butterfly valve, letting more or less air pass the butterfly. Adjusting the pilot screw that’s under the carburettor varies the amount of air premixing with the fuel before it enters the venturi. 4. The Main System Open the throttle and the cable that’s connected to the butterfly valve turns it from vertical to horizontal, so letting more air through the venturi. This increases the vacuum effect that is transferred up through the vacuum drilling in the slide to the diaphragm valve that leads to the diaphragm chamber. The top chamber is separated from the bottom by a rubber diaphragm. The bottom chamber is open to atmospheric pressure from the airbox. When the vacuum in the top chamber rises enough, the constant ambient pressure of the lower chamber helps the diaphragm valve overcome the downward force of the diaphragm spring, so it rises from the ven- turi. As the diaphragm is raised the needle is pulled out of the needle jet, exposing a thinner portion of the needle taper which allows more fuel to rise into the venturi to meet the increased engine demand. The key parts of the main system are shown in the photo below

Kawasaki Ninja 250 FAQ

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 15-11-2010

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Am I too small for this motorcycle? Duke – Sun May 14 17:38:31 2000 I’m only about 5’2″ and don’t have a problem, even though I can only touch the ground with the ends of my toes. Once you get a feel for the balance of the bike it’s not hard to keep everything upright. Only place I have trouble is pushing the bike backwards in a parking lot. Usually I just walk the bike (beside it) to where I can get on and get going. How does the EX500 compare to the EX250? Craig M. – Mon May 22 10:23:29 2000 I have both the EX250 and the EX500; both are Y2K models. The 250 is a screamer that performs well and can easily get me into trouble. My only complaints about the 250 are the excessive nose dive when getting on the front brake hard and the skittishness of the rear during high speed cornering. Both are easily corrected with suspension adjustments, I’ve just been too lazy to get the parts and do the work. A bit more wind protection would be great too. The 500 addresses these problems, the diving of the front end (to a degree); the rear’s skittishness and the wind protection. A plus for the 500 is the greater torque and power off the line; it pulls stronger (in my opinion) and will get you into illegal speed territory just a bit quicker than the 250. With greater weight, is has more stability in high speed and windy situations. Insurance is just about the same for both, with the 250 getting the nod for gas mileage. Service requirements are almost identical for both as well, being that they’re both parallel twins, the technology is the virtually the same. The downfalls of the 500: $2K more than the 250 (can do a lot to the 250 with that kind of money); buzzy mirrors, barely useful; heavier weight to have to push around the garage; lesser gas mileage (55-60 MPG; 250 pushes 70 MPG easily); engine is worse than a nervous dog shaking around at idle and at speed (here the 250 is far superior and much smoother). In my opinion, the 500 is a better suited for a larger rider, from a comfort standpoint. I feel I can stretch out a bit more on it than the 250 (I’m 5′ 9″, 160 lbs). The 250′s brakes are better tuned than the 500 and the shifter is much smoother. That may be due to the 3,500 mile difference between the two bikes. Bottom line, both bikes are great, the 250 is now my wife’s ride (mainly) and the 500′s mine (unless she steals the keys away). In time, I’ll make the adjustments to the 250; she doesn’t push it like I do.

2008 KTM 250 SX-F 250 XC-F, XCF-W 250 EXC-F, EXC-F SIX DAYS INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (KTM) by admin on 22-10-2010

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Hand brake lever The hand brake lever [1] is mounted on the handlebars on the right and actuates the front wheel brake. The adjusting screw [A] can be used to change the basic position of the hand brake lever (see “Maintenance”). 1 A Short circuit button The short circuit button [2] turns off the engine. When pressing this button, the ignition circuit is short-circuited. 2 Headlamp switch (XCF-W) In this model the headlamp is switched on with the pull switch [5] . 5 Flasher switch The flasher switch is a separate unit and is mounted on the left portion of the handlebar. The wire harness is designed in a way that whenever you want to use your bike off-road, you can dismount the entire turn indicator system without affecting the function of the remaining electrical system. Flasher left Flasher right
OPERATION INSTRUMENTS » ENGLISH 7 1 2 3 4 5 Starter button Pushing the red starter button [1] will actuate the E-starter. Emergency OFF switch (EXC-F Australia) The red emergency-OFF switch [2] is arranged adjacent to the throttle grip. In this position, the E-starter is operational and the engine can be started. In this position, the E-starter and ignition circuits are interrupted.The E-starter cannot be actuated, and the engine will not start, not even if you attempt to start it with the kickstarter. Pushing the black starter button [3] will actuate the E-starter. Indicator lamps The green control lamp [4] flashes in the same rhythm as the flashing indicator when the indicator is working. The blue control lamp [5] lights up when the high beam is on. TEST All of the display segments briefly light up for the display function test. Electronic speedometer The display in the electronic speedometer is activated as soon as you press a button on the speedometer or an impulse is received from the wheel sensor. The display lights up when the engine is running. The display is cleared if no button is pressed for 1 minute or no impulse is received from the wheel sensor. The button is used to change between display modes. The + and – buttons are used to control various functions

Vengeance Motorcycle Specification And Owner’s Manual

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Filed Under (Vengeance) by admin on 20-11-2010

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Vengeance Maxis • Vengeance Raven • Vengeance Banshee • Vengeance Whiplash • Hotrod Drifter • Hotrod CalChop • Hotrod Teacher • Hotrod Bone Shifting Gears Starting off and changing gears requires coordination of the clutch and throttle and gearshift lever. If you don’t do things right, the amount of control you have over the bike is lessened. To start off, pull in the clutch, shift into first gear, roll on the throttle a little, and ease out the clutch. You will become familiar with the friction zone (that’s where the clutch begins to take hold and move the bike), and you add a bit more throttle. You don’t want to stall the engine, nor do you want to over-rev it. There’s a sweet spot in there; find it. Shift while traveling in a straight line. Shifting in a curve is not good practice, and something to be avoided. Become familiar with the sound of your engine, so you can tell when you should shift without looking at your instruments. When you downshift to a lower gear, you should (in one swift, smooth movement) be able to squeeze the clutch, rev the engine a little to let it catch the lower gear smoothly, and shift down. When you come to a stop in traffic, leave the bike in first gear with the clutch disengaged (just in case you want to accelerate out of there in a hurry). Who knows what may be coming up behind you. Braking Don’t ever forget: The front brake on your motorcycle can supply as much as 70 percent or more of your stopping power. The single most important thing you can learn about braking is to use that front brake every single time you want to slow down. Turning When you are riding along the road, you lean a motorcycle into a turn. Learning to lean is an essential part of riding a motorcycle. It is a normal function of the bike when you are changing its path of travel – and quite different from turning the steering wheel of your car. To get the motorcycle to lean in a normal turn, press the handlebar in the direction of the turn and maintain slight pressure on that handlebar to take you smoothly through that particular turn. In other words: press right to go right; press left to go left. Your instincts to keep the motorcycle on a smooth path while keeping it from falling over usually take care of this without you even noticing it. (Demonstrate to yourself how a motorcycle moves by pressing a handlebar slightly while traveling in a straight line. The motorcycle will move in the direction of the handlebar you pushed.) • Slow down before you enter the turn; look as far ahead as possible through the turn. • Keep your feet on the pegs, and grip the gas tank with your knees. • Lean with the motorcycle; don’t try to sit perpendicular to the road while the motorcycle is leaning over. • Keep an even throttle through the turn, or even accelerate a little bit. Checking the Bike before the Ride It’s not fun to have things go wrong on a motorcycle, but if you spend a minute before you go off on a ride, you can increase the chances that nothing will.

1300 Yamaha V-Star Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 07-11-2010

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1) Place motorcycle on a firm level surface and secure in a upright position. 2) Remove saddle bags and saddle bag hardware (Tourer model only) Also remove rear riders pegs (Tourer model requires removal of rear footpeg offset hardware as well) 3) Attach bracket A (right) / B (left) to rear footpeg attachment point using new bolts provided. Remount footpegs/saddlebag hardware over top of brackets A/B. NOTE: Do not attach leveling stand bracket at this time 4) Attach bracket C(right) / D(left) to rear fender sub frame using new bolts provided. (Tourer model only – Saddle bag hardware mounts to the outside of brackets C/D. Brackets C/D mount between chrome side rail and saddlebag hardware.) NOTE: Brackets C/D have welded spacers which attach in toward rear fender 5) Attach top of Bracket E(right) / F(left) to rear of brackets C/D. Brackets E/F mount to the inside of brackets C/D. NOTE: Use ½ inch spacer between brackets E/F and C/D on Tourer model ONLY
6) Attach rear of brackets A/B to TOP of forward hitch arms. Attach bottom to brackets E/F to rear hitch plate. 7) Carefully tighten all bolts at this time ensuring hitch is square with motorcycle. Hitch Bracket Identification Leveling stand screw jack installation 1) Attach leveling stand brackets to brackets A and B 2) Thread right side screw jack into threaded hole on leveling stand bracket attached to bracket A sand adjust leveling jack bolt out. 3) Push motorcycle over from left side until right screw jack is touching floor. 4) Thread left side screw jack into threaded hole on leveling stand bracket attached to bracket B and adjust out until motorcycle will rest upright on both screw jacks. 5) Adjust screw jacks until motorcycle is level. 6) After InstaTrike is attached to or removed from receiver hitch, be sure to remove leveling stands and leveling stand brackets. CAUTION – Use screw jacks to hold motorcycle upright and level ONLY. Do not lift motorcycle with screw jacks. CAUTION – Use care when installing screw jacks. Be certain that motorcycle is always in a stable balanced position.
INSTALLATION OF THE TOW-PAC HITCH CART. 1. Place your motorcycle on a smooth flat surface, like a garage floor, and install leveling stands. Install right leveling stand first. Carefully raise motorcycle off of side stand and install left leveling stand. Caution – Use leveling stands to level motorcycle ONLY. Do not raise motorcycle with stands Caution – Be certain that motorcycle is always in a stable balanced position when installing leveling stands. 2. Assemble the axles, tires and wheels, and fenders onto the tow- pac hitch cart. 3. Carefully align the tow-pac hitch cart’s hitch mount with the receiver hitch on the motorcycle. Now push the hitch mount into the receiver hitch. (this might be a little difficult until you get use to doing it. Removing the paint from the hitch mount and applying a little grease will help.) 4. Place the hitch pin through the receiver hitch and hitch mount ( alignment plate ). Install and tighten the tension bolt

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