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SUZUKI MOTORCYCLES Gsxr 600, Gsxr 750, Gsxr 1000 teak the lead

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Filed Under (Suzuki) by admin on 12-11-2010

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The launch of the sixth generation of Gsxr marked a shift in Suzuki’s emphasis on two fronts. One, the Gsxr 1000 now took the upper hand in the development stakes. Historically, the Gsxr 750 led the march-arriving first, gaining the most recent technology, absorbing the lion’s share of corporate pride-but by 2003 the Gsxr 1000 was in the lead. Two, the Gsxr 1000 represents another, more subtle shift for Suzuki engineering, in which the designers-the lucky guys who get to clothe these amazing machines-have more freedom of expression. With this generation, the designs turned edgier, sharper, more aggressive looking than ever. What’s more, the Gsxr 1000 K3 would be the proving ground for a host of changes brought to the Gsxr 600 and Gsxr 750 for 2004. In fact, nearly every upgrade to the smaller bikes appeared on the Gsxr 1000 a year before. But the real impetus for driving the Gsxr 1000 to the head of development and, indeed, shortening its development cycle was competition both on the track and in the showroom. For the track, it was understood that Superbike racing would revert to allowing 1000 cc four-cylinder bikes in place of the 750s that had been the limit since 1982. In 2002, Yoshimura and Mat Mladin barely lost the AMA Superbike crown to Nicky Hayden aboard the Honda RC5!. But it would be the RC’s swan song of competitiveness with the change to 1000 cc fours. To keep speeds in check, the AMA Superbike rules would require 1000 cc fours to have some additional limitations compared to the twins and triples. For example, “Cylinder heads may be ported and machined, but altering of valve angles will not be permitted; aftermarket valves, springs, retainers, and other valve-train components will be permitted; valves must be stock size and same basic material as original equipment; aftermarket camshafts will be permitted, but earn lift and resulting valve lift must be no greater than stock. “In addition, the “stock crankshaft must be retained, The only allowable modifications are balancing, polishing of bearing surfaces and attachment of accessory drives. Homologated transmission gear sets (one optional set of ratios per approved model) will be permitted. Optional sets will be price-controlled and must be available to any legitimate AMA Superbike competitor. Homologated fuel-injection throttle-body assemblies (one optional type per approved model) and aftermarket airboxes will be permitted. Modifications to throttle bodies will not be permitted. Optional throttle bodies will be price-controlled and must be available to any legitimate AMA Superbike competitor.” The thinking was simple: keep the liter bikes from sucking through massive throttle bodies, and the horsepower might not (and, it was hoped, would not) go through the roof. In preparation for racing, Suzuki moto wanted to make a host of small changes to the Gsxr 1000, but its motivation was also to keep the bike at the forefront of open-class street bikes. Suzuki engineers knew that Honda and Kawasaki were readying all-new models-the CBR 954 RR and the ZX 9 R had long since been vanquished-and rumor had it that Yamaha was ready with yet another push with the R1.It was the right time to make alterations to the Gsxr 1000. Heading the list was, as one might expect, a revised engine.

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SUZUKI Hayabusa, GSXR 1000, GSXR 750, GSXR 600 Sport Brake Lever INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Suzuki) by admin on 21-02-2012

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Before you install your new ASV brake lever, you MUST choose the correct brake light switch tab to install. You will find in the package with this lever one plastic bag with four smaller bags inside of it. One bag has two small phillips screws. The other three bags have small black aluminum blocks (light switch tabs) with labels on them. Part# BRC511-H is ONLY for HONDA motorcycles. Part# BRC511-STK is for all SUZUKI, TRIUMPH and 05-06 KAWASAKI ZX636R motorcycles ONLY. Part# BRC511-K is for all KAWASAKI motorcycles EXCEPT the 05-06 ZX636R . Choose the correct tab for your bike and install it onto the lever as shown in photo 2b using the two small Phillips head screws provided. It is recommended that you use locktite or another type of thread locking adhesive to make sure these screws do not come loose. Be sure to tighten these screws as tight as you can without stripping them. The brake stop / light tab is required for your ASV brake lever to work properly Carefully place the lever into the master cylinder while inserting the plunger rod into the barrel hole as shown in photo 4. Install the main pivot bolt, and tighten it until it is snug against the master cylinder. Do not over-tighten, as it could cause the lever to bind in the master cylinder

ODYSSEY DRYCELL MOTORCYCLE BATTERY COMPATIBILITY

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Filed Under (Triumph) by admin on 30-10-2010

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BMW 1200 1200 1150 1100 1100 1000 1000 1000 1000 900 850 800 800 800 750 750 750 750 750 650 650 600 600 500 BUELL 1200 1200 1200 1000 DUCATI 860 750 500 HARLEY DAVIDSON 1570 1570 1450 1450 1340 1340 1340 1200 883 HONDA 1800 1500 1200 1100 1000 1000 900 750 750 650 650 650 600 400 200 150 150 125 K1200RS, LT R1200C R1150GS, R R1100GS/R R1100RS/T/S/LT “K” Models R100/7 100RS R100GS, R, RS, RT R90/6, R90S R850R R80GS, R80ST R80, R80RT R80/7/RT K75, RT K75C, S R75/5 R75/7 R75/6 R65 R65LS R60/5 R60/6, R60/7 R50/5 S1 Lightning X1, S3, S3T, M2 S2/T, RS1200, RR1200 RR1000 GT, GTS GT, Laguna Seca GTL, GTV, Sport FXST, FLST FXD FXD FXST, FLST FXD FXST, FLST FL/H/T/HT XL, XLH XLH, XLH GL1800, VTX1800C Gold Wing-All Gold Wing-All Gold Wing-GL1100 CBX1000, SS opt. Gold Wing-GL1000 CBR900R,RR CB750A (Hondamatic) VFR740R/ RVF750R NT650, SLR650, NX650 Vigor 650 XR650L VT600C, CD, CBR600 CBR400F CB-1 TR200 Fat Cat CH150 Elite FES150 FES125, Pantheon (97 -) (98 -) (00 -) (94-00) (90 -) (83-93) (76-84) (83) (87-95) (69-76) (95-97) (80-96) (84-95) (78-84) (85-95) (85-95) (70-73) (76-84) (69-76) (84-95) (78-84) (70-73) (69-84) (70-73) (96-99) (ALL) (ALL) (87) (2007) (2007) (99-06) (00-06) (97-99) (91-99) (80-96) (97-03) (97-02) (01-06) (88-00) (84-87) (80-83) (82) (75-79) (93-99) (76-78) (90/94) (88-91) (ALL) (93-06) (87-03) (89-90) (86) (87) (ALL) (ALL) #3561 #3561 #3561 #3561 #3561 #4989 #4989 #3561 #4989 #4989 #3561 #3561 #4989 #4989 #4989 #3561 #3561 #4989 #4989 #4989 #3561 #3561 #4989 #3561 #3591** #3591 #3591 #3591 #4989 #4989 #3561 #3591 #2528 #2528 #3591 #2528 #3591 #3560 #2528** #2528** #2528 #3560* #3560* #3560* #3560* #3560* #2519* #3560* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* PC680 PC680 PC680 PC680 PC680 PC925L PC925L PC680 PC925L PC925L PC680 PC680 PC925L PC925L PC925L PC680 PC680 PC925L PC925L PC925L PC680 PC680 PC925L PC680 PC545MJ PC545MJ PC545MJ PC545MJ PC925L PC925L PC680 PC545MJ PC545 PC545 PC545MJ PC545 PC545MJ PC680MJ PC545 PC545 PC545 PC680MJ PC680MJ PC680MJ PC680MJ PC680MJ PC310 PC680MJ PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 cc model (year) cat. # mfg sku # KAWASAKI 1500 1500 1300 1000 1000 900 900 750 750 650 636 600 600 KTM 640 620 400 400 MOTO GUZZ I 1100 1100 1100 1000 1000 850 850 750 650 650 650 500 POLARIS All SUZUKI 1400 900 750 750 750 650 600 600 600 600 400 TRIUMPH 600 YAMAHA 1600 1300 1300 1200 1100 1100 1100 920 600 600 VN 1500-A Vulcan VN 1500-C Vulcan KZ 1300 Touring KZ 1000-P Police Z1000 ZX900-C, Ninja ZX900-E, F Ninja KZ750-L, Ninja Zx750 Ninja ZX, 7RR KLX650C, R ZX636-B Ninja ZX-6R ZX600-G, J Ninja ZX ZX600-K Ninja ZX Adventure, Duke, RXC Adventure, Duke, LC4 LC4 E/XC RXC LC4 Cali/Spc/Jackl/Stone/EV Quota/Sport 1100 VII EV/Bassa California III,Quota,Millie Convert,Daytona, LeMans LeMans T3, T4, T5 Nevada,NTX,Strada,V7,V75 NTX V65 V65 Florida V50 Victory GV 1400GC RF900, R, S, ZS GSX750F Katana GSX-R750 GSXR750W DR650SE GSF600S Bandit GSX600F Katana GSX-R600 RF600R, S GSF400 Bandit Daytona 600 XV 1600 Road Star 1300 Royal Star XVZ Venture Royale XVZ12T Venture XJ1100 Maxim XS 1100, L, S XV 1100, S/ Virago XV 920/R/M Virago XJ600S Seca II XT600E (87-98) (96-97) (79-82) (82-05) (03-04) (98-99) (00-04) (93) (91-97) (93-96) (03-04) (98-02) (03) (99-02) (96-98) (96-98) (96-01) (94-05) (97-02) (98-99) (ALL) (86-88) (94-97) (98-03) (96-99) (94-95) (96-04) (96-03) (98-04) (97-03) (94-96) (91-93) (03-04) (99-03) (96-03) (86-92) (83-85) (82) (78-92) (86-99) (81-83) (92-98) (90-95) #3560 #3560 #3560 #3560 #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #4989 #2528 #4989 #4989 #4989 #4989 #4989 #3561 #3561 #4989 #3561 #4989 #2519* #3560 #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2519* #2528*** #2528*** #3560 #3560 #3560 #3560 #3560 #3560 #2519* #2519* PC680MJ PC680MJ PC680MJ PC680MJ PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC925L PC545 PC925L PC925L PC925L PC925L PC925L PC680 PC680 PC925L PC680 PC925L PC310 PC680MJ PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC310 PC545 PC545 PC680MJ PC680MJ PC680MJ PC680MJ PC680MJ PC680MJ PC310 PC310

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Suspension Basics for BMW Motorcycles

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 30-11-2010

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tires: Tires are the first part of any suspension system. The design of the tire and even the pressure you run can have a profound affect on the way your motorcycle handles. Stiff, low profile tires will give a sharper feel to the bike, as will higher tire pressures. Those of us who ride our GS’s off the road will decrease the tire pressure to about 50% of the street spec when we are in the dirt. The tire then becomes a very active part of the suspension, but will wallow like an old pig if not re-inflated when pressed back into pavement duty. It still surprises me when we have a customer complain that his BMW needs new shocks when they come in with nearly flat tires. It is possible that the best dollars-per- unit improvement you can make to your BMW may be in keeping the tires inflated. Chassis: There is not much that we can do about the chassis design, unless we are Troy the Welder, but it is a fact that different frames and swing arms flex differently and therefore are part of the suspension. On the Airheads, we often braced various parts of the frame and swing arms, resulting in improved handling that even mere mortals could appreciate. On the latest BMW’s it would take the likes of a Valentino Rossi to even notice if the parts were stiffened. Stiffer is not always better. One of the Japanese racing bike manufactures controls the stiffness of the frame in various areas to allow some flex for better handling. So, Mr. Rossi might not even like it if Troy stiffened his new BMW. Springs: Springs control the ride height of the motorcycle and the ability to allow for different loads. On most BMW’s there is a way to adjust the spring preload to some extent so that the ride can be optimized for a light rider or two-up operation with luggage. Dampers: Dampers control the speed and frequency at which the suspension operates by changing the kinetic (moving) energy to thermal (heat) energy. Without the damper, the suspension would oscillate as each movement occurred, resulting in decreased vehicle control. Dampers on BMW’s fall into two main groups. On airheads, older K bikes, F and G models, and the R1200 HP-2, the front dampers are integrated into the forks. On the rear of the above mentioned -3 – models, and on both ends of all the rest of the bikes, there is a more common shock absorber, around which the spring is located. The HP-2 uses an air spring and air dampened rear shock. Seat: OK, folks, this is here for my old buddy Jeff. We know that a seat isn’t part of suspension, but a bad one sure can make you miserable. We have sent dozens of seats to our friend Mike Harris for inexpensive mods that might improve your riding enjoyment more than any suspension changes you could make! Let us know if we can help you with this most important item

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2008 Suzuki GSXR 600-750 Super bike Kit INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Suzuki) by admin on 29-01-2011

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Step 1: Identify the key components that complete our SUPERBIKE brake line kit: You should have two (2) hoses, one (1) double banjo bolt, and two (2) male adapters with two 1.55mm thick washers. There are also a total of (7) washers. five (5) will be used, and two (2) are spares. We strongly suggest having a professional mechanic install these brake lines; all other installations VOID warranty. Step 2: To ensure no paint damage from a brake fluid spill, completely cover the front end of the bike. This process is messy, and brake fluid WILL drip! Step 3: Uninstall stock hoses; be aware of how the stock system was routed in case you need to re-install it. Step 4: Install the Galfer adapters onto the right and left calipers. Thread each adapter with the two thick crush washers provided into the calipers with one washer, and torque at 12 to 13 ft pounds. Step 5: Install the right and left lines to the calipers, using the shorter line on the right side. These lines will travel from the master cylinder to the calipers; a double banjo bolt is included to run two lines down. The positioning sequence on the master cylinder is as follows: Master cylinder, washer, 90 degree banjo from left line, washer, 90 banjo from right line, washer and double banjo hex. Double banjo bolt torque level is 12 FT Pounds. (For positioning see picture A) Make sure that the 90-degree fittings on each caliper are pointing away from the bike just a little bit (see picture B) . Thread each female end into the adapter, and torque to 6 ½ Ft pounds. Before you proceed to the next step, please check for clearance of the lines. Compress the front end to make sure that the lines are not binding with anything. When the front end is fully extended or fully compressed, double check that the lines are traveling correctly and clear from any obstructions. Once the lines have been checked for clearance, we recommend using (GALFER’S C-CLIP) to bring the lines together about the same level as the lower triple clamp.

HARLEY DAVIDSON TOURING SUSPENSION AIR PUMP KIT OPERATION/ INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 07-03-2011

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OPERATION 1. Remove cap from air suspension air valve and connect pump by threading the air valve adapter (1) on the pump as shown in Figure 1. When adapter is threaded properly, the current air pressure in the system will be indicated on the gauge of the pump. Do not exceed maximum air pressure for rear suspension. Air components fill rapidly. Therefore, use low air line pressure. Failure to do so may result in possible damage to components. (00165a) NOTES See the motorcycle’s Owner’s Manual or, if installed, the air suspension lowering kit’s instruction sheet for the recommended air pressures. Using pressures outside the recommended loading range will result in a reduction of available suspension travel and reduced rider comfort. 2. To increase pressure, operate the air pump handle (4) until the desired pressure is indicated on gauge (2). Use caution when bleeding air from the suspension. Moisture combined with lubricant may leak onto the rear wheel, tire and/or brake components and adversely affect traction, which could result in death or serious injury. (00084a) NOTE The pressure release button is designed to release pressure slowly. If the button is completely or rapidly depressed, no air will be released. For the best results, depress the pressure release button slowly and only partially. 3. To decrease pressure, slowly depress the pressure release button (3) on the pump until desired pressure is indicated on gauge (2)

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victory 650 And 750 twIns specification

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Filed Under (Victory) by admin on 13-11-2010

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Super Sport. The example tested by Cycle World magazine in August 1968 looked identical to the European specification 750 except for higher handlebars, a 35/35 watt headlight, larger round CEV taillight, 120mph Smiths speedometer, and an American Eagle tank badge. The headlamp shell was also different, with an additional warning lamp, and the American Eagle headlight shell featured the large hole and rubber plug (with Laverda logo) as on some early 650s. When tested by Cycle magazine in January 1969 (now called the American Eagle ‘Classic’) there was a different colour scheme, with pinstriping on the fuel tank and sidecovers (although this colour scheme also appeared in some Italian advertising and official photos). Optional for the American Eagle was a large chrome-plated engine protection bar with chrome Vitaloni rear vision mirrors attached on each side. In McCormack’s advertising the bore and stroke of the American Eagle were listed as 79.5 x 76.2mm, and this was obviously incorrect as the engine specifications were the same as the European versions. The claimed power by McCormack for the American Eagle was also Below: This Super Sport, number 1646, is based on a 750 GT, but others were converted 750 Ss. ** t he l AverdA t wIns & t rIples B IBle top triple clamp from the top. A round reflector was situated on the headlamp mounts. As there was no room for all the wiring inside this smaller shell, the electrical connectors were moved underneath the fuel tank, and there were thick grey wires leading to the Lucas switches. When turn signals were fitted these were also Lucas, the handlebar switch being on the right. The throttle was now a chrome-plated, dual-cable Tommaselli Daytona 2C, without a throttle stop, with the handlebar also Tommaselli. The dual seat on a fibreglass base, or solo seat with locking compartment, continued as before. The 750 SF1 continued to be sold in the UK, where the price was £998, but at that time a 750cc Triumph Bonneville T140V sold for £625 so the Laverda was never going to be a volume seller. In Italy, the SF1 was still one of the most popular large capacity machines available, selling for L1,227,200 when the Triumph T140V sold for L1,357,000

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HARLEY DAVIDSON SPORTSTER LOW REAR SUSPENSION KIT INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 13-02-2011

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INSTALLATION NOTE Internal shock absorber components are not repairable beyond the Service Parts listed on this instruction sheet. Consult your Harley-Davidson dealer if further service is required. The installation procedures for this kit are the same as the original equipment (OE) installation procedures in the Service Manual. Refer to the appropriate Service Manual for the rear suspension system removal and installation procedures. The OE hardware will be re-used in the kit installation. Installation of any accessory suspension components can affect cornering clearance. This could distract the rider, causing loss of control and death or serious injury. (00431b) SHOCK PRELOAD (SPRING) ADJUSTMENT Refer to the appropriate Service Manual for spring adjustment. Spanner wrench (94700-52L) is required for spring adjustment. SERVICE PARTS 1 is04854 Figure 1. Service Parts: Sportster Low Rear Suspension Kit Table 1. Service Parts: Sportster Low Rear Suspension Kit Part Number Description (Quantity) Item 54734-04 Rear shock (2)

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HONDA GOLD WING GL1800 Independent Suspension Owner's Maintenance Notes

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 16-02-2011

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1. Tire Pressure and Rotation : Keep the nominal tire pressure at about 23-27psig. It is not necessary to periodically rotate the trike tires unless you experience unusual tire wear. 2. Bearing Lubrication . Your Swing Arm and wheel bearings are sealed and do not require greasing. However, should you experience unusual wheel bearing noise you should take your trike to a Champion Trike Dealer or to your motorcycle mechanic for a checkup. 3. Body Lubrication . There are no grease fittings on the trike body and no required body lubrication points. 4. Rear end lubrication . Your differential comes filled with SAE 85W140 API GL-6 gear oil. You should not have to top-off the differential unless you experience axle seal or pinion seal leaks. If you want to check the oil level, do so by removing the fill plug on the top of the differential housing (Remove seat) and by using a suitable measuring device, the oil level should be 5 1/4″ inch down from the top of the differential housing. Refill as necessary. Change the differential oil every 30,000 – 35,000 miles by draining it and refill with 2 quarts of above gear oil.. 5. Brakes . Check your front and rear brake system fluid levels every 3,000 miles and top-off as necessary. Inspect brake pads every 10,000 miles and replace as necessary. Rear brake pads are Volkswagen Part # D101P. 6. Drive Train . The rear driveshaft U-joint and slip yoke spline are fitted with grease fittings, pump the fittings with wheel-bearing, graphite or high-pressure grease every 3,000 to 5,000 miles. The front u-joint does not have grease fittings. 7. Suspension System : The suspension is a Double A-arm Independent suspension with a standard single setting anti-roll bar or an optional Variable Sway Control (VSC) which can be adjustment for optimal ride, handling characteristics and performance. The A- arms are equiped with bushings that does not require servicing. The suspension system is designed to give you the best ride with a load of no more than 600 pounds (passengers plus cargo plus trailer tongue weight): 8. EZ-Steer (rake kit) : If your trike is equipped with Champion’s EZ-Steer, the bearings are a wear item. You should follow your motorcycle manufacturer’s recommended front-end triple-tree maintenance requirements. Generally these call for an initial service at 1,000 miles followed by periodic maintenance at 10,000 mile intervals

Kawasaki Vulcan Front Suspension Lowering Kit Installation manual

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 27-02-2011

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INSTALLATION 1. This lowering method requires replacement of the front spring spacers. This is a simple task, and is completely reversible. First, raise the front tire off of the ground before you begin. Raise the motorcycle so no weight is applied to the front wheel. 2. Cover the gas tank with a thick towel to prevent scratching. Don’t omit this…you’ll be sorry if you do! 3. If the handlebar risers are OEM (stock), loosen the handlebars in their clamps and lift them from the risers, carefully placing them on the gas tank on a thick towel to prevent scratching. This will allow room for the spring spacers to be removed from the front forks. 4. Using a small knife blade, sharp screw driver, etc. in the pinch grove on each side of the triple clamp, gently pry upwards and pop the chromed plastic covers off. These are the covers on the top of the front forks, covering the spring retainers. Below these chrome caps, you’ll find a gold anodized metal plug with a small counter bore in the center. This is the part used to retain the springs within the front fork tubes. Using an extension bar, large Phillips screwdriver, etc., press down a bit in the counter bored area of the plug to take the pressure off of the small internal “C” ring. While this “gold” colored plug is depressed, remove the internal C-ring. The C-ring is made of small diameter wire. Once the C-ring is removed, slowly release the pressure on the plug and it’ll push itself out of the top of the shock. The picture below is of the upper fork leg with the gold retaining plug removed. 5. Stick a finger into the fork tube, and slide the OEM tubular spacer up and out of the fork tube. 6. The picture below illustrates the use of a Scootworks lowering spacer with the fork spring. On the right hand end of the you’ll see a Scootworks lowering spacer. The fork spring stays in the front fork, and you’ll drop in the spacer with the desired amount of lowering. The approximate amount of lowering is marked on each Scootworks spacer. 7. Select the spacers for the desired amount of lowering. The longest spacers supplied are marked as [1] and will lower the front suspension 1″. The spacers of middle length are marked as [2] and will lower the front suspension by 2″. The shortest spacers supplied in the kit are marked as [3] and will lower the front suspension by 3″. Omission of the spacers completely will lower the front suspension by approximately 4″. 8. Install the selected spacers in the fork tubes, on top of the internal fork spring. Place the gold anodized metal plugs on top of the spacers and press them back into the fork tube. Be sure to turn the metal plug so the side with the counter bore is facing outwards. Reinstall the C-rings, and gently lower the front end back to the ground. Make sure the C-rings seat themselves in their respective grooves when the weight of the bike is placed back on the front end. Re-install the chrome caps.

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