how to adjust steering head bmw r1200rs

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STEERING GEAR/ STEERING WHEEL REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION

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Filed Under (Uncategorized) by admin on 05-10-2011

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TEERING GEAR/STEERING WHEEL REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Page 3 of 4 STEERING GEAR/STEERING WHEEL INSTALLATION PROCEDURES (Cont’d) 2. Center spiral cable. a. Turn the cable counterclockwise by hand until it becomes harder to turn. b. Then rotate the cable clockwise about 2.5 or 3 turns to align the marks. (See Fig. 4) 3. Install the steering wheel. a. Align the matchmarks on the wheel and steering main shaft. b. Temporarily tighten the wheel set nut. c. Connect the spiral cable connector. 4. Bleed Power Steering System (when applicable). 5. Check steering wheel center point. 6. Torque steering wheel set nut. See the applicable vehicle’s repair manual for the torque specification. 7. Install and center steering wheel pad. NOTICE: Make sure the pad is centered and installed to the specified torque. If the pad has been dropped, or there are cracks, dents or other defects in the case or connector, replace the wheel pad with a new one. When installing the pad, take care that the wiring does not interfere with other parts and is not pinched between other parts. a) Connect the airbag wiring connector. b) Install the pad after confirming that torx screws are in the screw case. c) Using a torx socket, torque the screws to the specification in the vehicle’s Repair Manual. (See Fig. 5) d) Install the steering wheel lower cover

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BMW Motorcycles All R1100 Models- Cylinder Head Gasket

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 16-11-2010

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Situation: All R1100 models produced from calendar week 18 (April 28, 1997) onwards will be equipped with head gaskets of Multi-Layered Steel (MLS) technology. Service Information: The MLS cylinder head gasket can be used in place of all earlier gaskets, on all R1100 models, without any modifications. Part Number: MSL cylinder head gasket for all R1100 models. P/N: 11 12 1 341 173 Note: The MLS cylinder-head gasket is applicable to R1100 models only. If it becomes necessary to replace cylinder-head gaskets on R850 R models, the conventional gasket, P/N 11 12 1 342 082, must be used. Warranty Processing: If your retail center has any quantity of the conventional head gasket for the R 1100 models, P/N: 11 12 1 342 127, in stock, please file a warranty claim using the information below. If your retail center has the engine gasket set, P/N: 11 00 1 341 901 in stock , please make sure that the new style MLS gaskets are used in place of the conventional head gasket supplied in this set. All current BMW NA inventory of P/N 11 00 1 341 901 will have the MLS head gasket included. Defect Code: 00 11 01 00 00 Frame Number: 4990150 Warranty Type: 2 Warranty Stage: 1 Very truly yours,

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HARLEY DAVIDSON STEERING HEAD WASHER KIT INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 05-02-2011

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INSTALLATION The rider’s safety depends upon the correct installation of this kit. Use the appropriate service manual procedures. If the procedure is not within your capabilities or you do not have the correct tools, have a Harley-Davidson dealer perform the installation. Improper installation of this kit could result in death or serious injury. (00333a) NOTE This instruction sheet references Service Manual information. A Service Manual for your model motorcycle is required for this installation and is available from a Harley-Davidson Dealer. 1. See Figure 1. Remove the fork stem cap (1). Bend the lockwasher (2) tab away from the steering stem nut (3) and remove the fork stem nut and lockwasher. Discard the lockwasher. NOTE Always tighten the steering stem nut (3) to 70 – 80 ft-lbs (95 – 109 Nm) before measuring fall away. Lubricate threads of nut with a small amount of clean engine oil. Avoid applying oil to the mating surfaces of the steering stem nut (3) and the new hardened washer from the kit. 2. Install the new hardened washer from the kit (2) and steering stem nut (3). Tighten steering stem nut (3) to 70 – 80 ft-lbs (95 – 109 Nm). 3. Check fall away following the instructions in STEERING HEAD BEARINGS BEARING ADJUSTMENT (FALLAWAY) in an appropriate Service Manual, however, tighten the steering stem nut (3) to 70 – 80 ft-lbs . Adjust adjusting nut (5), if necessary per instructions. 4. Install fork stem cap (1).

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1994 – 2004 BMW Motorcycle History

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 17-11-2010

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1994 brought many changes to BMW, most obviously by the introduction of the “R259″ series twins and the elimination of the old standby “Airhead” twins that had been BMW’s trademark for seven decades. While it is interesting to look at all the technologies introduced during the 1994 to 2004 time block, it is also exciting to look into what was going on as far as changes in BMW more esoteric than measurable. In this author’s opinion there were unspoken changes in BMW’s mindset and philosophy. BMW had forged it’s reputation for long lasting, simple machines built to the highest standards and quality; aimed at a dwindling, older (OK, Jeff, more mature) market of enthusiastic but eccentric riders. They built motorcycles that were easy for the owners to maintain and modify to fit their specific wants. BMW had always built their bikes their way; often it seemed like they did so in spite of what the younger and upwardly mobile riders were looking for. By 1994, the airhead was simply not a sellable motorcycle; the buying market was younger and wanted performance in line with what the Japanese products offered at much lower prices. The K 75/100 series that were so far ahead of their time in 1984 when they were introduced were also showing their age. No doubt, BMW knew this was coming many years before the new “Oil Head” was introduced. They knew that the riding community had reduced its mean age substantially. The younger riders had money to spend on a bike that had to be BMW, yet had to be totally more modern both in performance and in perception than what BMW had been selling. Thus, the R259 was born. The Birth of the R259 Twins The new BMW corporate mindset, if you will, was no longer concerned with selling motorcycles that would be handed down from one generation to the next, nor was BMW concerned about ease of maintenance with standard hand tools. Although the new bikes were still able to outlast the riders, the concern for building units to last a quarter-million miles was not so much in the forefront of the design. The new models would have to be powerful, fast, handle better than anything on the road; they would need to offer a standard of technology that the Japanese would never build. They should be complex pieces of rolling art. Most obvious, though, was that they would build a product aimed at an entirely new market of riders who would likely not be interested in maintaining the bikes themselves or really understanding the nuances of design. The new customers BMW was looking for were serious riders who were more interested in the fun and excitement of riding than they were in savoring the history of the older designs

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Tacoma Power Steering Pump Improving Power Steering Reservoir modification

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Filed Under (Toyota Manuals) by admin on 02-10-2011

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For my SAS I decided to add hydraulic steering assist as it comes in real handy for rock crawling. I got the Redneck Ram setup from the folks at West Texas Off-road that includes rebuilding an earlier IFS steering box along with drilling and tapping the box for the included ram. One of the down sides of adding a ram is that it slows the steering down because the stock steering pump has to supply the added volume for the hydraulic ram. Another is that it creates a fluid volume change in the system reservoir that needs to be compensated for in some way. After doing some reading on the West Texas site about how to go about modifying a Saginaw pump and reading up on earlier Toyota pump mods for steering assist setups on the Pirate board, I decided to give it whirl and see what I could do about the Tacoma pump. Chuck Gardella was kind enough to supply me with a blown pump that I could rebuild and submit to my endless fiddling and tinkering. I plan to give him my pump in return when I get this one done and installed. You need to do something to allow for more room in the reservoir for the standard hydraulic ram assist setup so I decided to tackle the reservoir first. The reason you need the extra space is because the ram is unbalanced. That is there is a rod on one side of the cylinder and not on the other side so the volume of the fluid has to change in the system to account for the volume of the rod as it travels back and forth. I calculated the volume of the rod that I have at full stroke to be about 2 oz or so. This would equate to plus or minus up to 2 oz. in the pump reservoir. Well first off, it’s no wonder why so many folks boil their steering pumps over with heavy wheeling and have so many other steering problems. The stock power steering reservoir doesn’t even rate pint sized

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Motorcycle Derived Steering / Suspension Systems

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 29-11-2010

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1. Examine the handlebars and fork yokes. 2. Turn the steering from lock to lock with the steered wheel both on a turning plate and clear of the ground. Cont’d Reason for Rejection 1. A handlebar or fork yoke a. deformed b. fractured c. cracked d. excessively corroded e. clamps not tight, or any bolt loose or missing f. handgrips missing or not secure to handlebars g. handlebar flexible mounting excessively deteriorated. 2. a. any fouling or restriction of the free movement of the steering from lock to lock b. handlebar grip/s or handlebar mounted control/s have no clearance with any other part of the machine when the steering is placed on either full lock c. steering movement excessively stiff or rough Reason for Rejection 5 does not apply to fork gaiters or shrouds. . Cont’d Method of Inspection 3. Examine the steering damper. 4. Examine the steering head bearings. 5. Examine the front fork assembly. Cont’d Reason for Rejection 3. A steering damper a. insecure b. ineffective c. impairing the steering action. 4. Excessive free play in the steering head bearings. 5. A fork assembly component which is a. missing b. loose c. cracked d. excessively bent, misaligned, corroded, worn, or has excessive free play between the sliding members of the forks, the pivot bearings or bushes e. restricted in operation f. fouling

YAMAHA VIRAGO 700/ 1100 2 into 2 EXHAUST SYSTEM REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 20-12-2010

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REMOVING THE STOCK EXHAUST SYSTEM 1. Loosen the slip joint clamp on the front and rear head pipe, which are located at the muffler box. 2. Remove the two nuts that hold the front head pipe to the engine. Slip the head pipe out of the muffler box and set it aside. Note: Do not remove the rear head pipe, it has been incorporated in the design of the new exhaust system. 3. Remove the muffler box mounting bolt located in front of the passenger foot rest on the left side. 4. Remove two bolts from the right passenger foot rest assembly and set the foot rest aside. 5. Slide the muffler box off of the rear head pipe and set it aside. 6. Replace the muffler box mounting bolt (from step #3) using the washer and nut (supplied) on the back side. INSTALLING YOUR NEW VANCE & HINES EXHAUST SYSTEM 1. Attach the mounting bar to the motorcycle frame behind the right passenger foot rest. Align the two holes in the largest bracket on the mounting bar with the two holes on the frame, be sure the bend in the mounting bar is pointing to the center of the motorcycle. 2. Install the round steel spacer (supplied) to the rear most hole in the bracket. 3. Attach the foot rest using the two 8mm x 1.25 x 25mm bolts (supplied). 4. Slide the new exhaust flange (supplied) onto the front head pipe. 5. Install the two heat shields to the front head pipe using the four hose clamps (supplied). Unscrew all of the hose clamps (supplied) until they are completely loose. Feed the tail end of the hose clamp into the clips on the inside of both heat shields. Place the heat shields onto the front head pipe. Note: Be sure the bend in the heat shield matches the bend in the head pipe exactly. Wrap the hose clamp around the head pipe and give the screw three to four turns, leaving heat shield loose on the head pipe. Repeat this step with the heat shield on the rear head pipe. Note: The screw end of the hose clamp should be accessible, but not visible when pipe is mounted on the bike. 6. Check the stock exhaust gaskets to be sure they are in good shape. If you have any doubts as to their condition, replace them. 7. Slide a chrome pinch clamp (supplied) onto the expanded end of the new rear head pipe. Install a 3/8″ x 1″ bolt with a flat washer on either side of the clamp followed by a lock nut (hardware supplied). Repeat this step on the inlet end of each muffler using the two muffler clamps with 5/16″ x 1 1/4″ bolts (hardware supplied) but leave the clamp loose at this time. 8. Slip the new rear head pipe with the heat shield attached, over the stock rear pipe and gasket, but leave the clamp loose at this time. 9. Install the front head pipe, with the heat shield attached and stock gasket in place, to the front cylinder using the stock nuts, leave them loose at this time

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Kawasaki 900/1100 Billet Head Installation And REMOVAL Instructions

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 25-10-2010

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1) Remove stock head and clean the top surface of the cylinder. 2) Remove the stock water fitting from the stock head and install it in the ADA Racing® billet head in the center cylinder location. Install the 1/8″ npt brass plugs in the 2 outer cylinder locations. 3) Install all o’rings in the ADA Racing® billet head, use small amounts of grease to hold them in place, do not use super glue or silicone. 4) Apply a small amount of grease to the small (OR020) o’ring at the top of the dome. This will allow the dome to easily slip into the head shell. Be careful when turning the head upside down to install onto the cylinder, as the domes can slide out of the head shell. 5) Make sure all the o’rings are in place and place the head on top of the cylinder with the water outlet on the intake side. You must be sure that none of the o’rings slip out of their groove, as this will cause an o’ring to get pinched and a water or compression leak could result. 7) Torque all of the nuts to 15ft/lbs, in a center-out criss-cross pattern. Now, torque them again to 18ft/lbs. 8) After the 1st time out riding the head should be re-torqued. 9) The 2 additional 1/8″ npt holes in the ADA Racing® billet head come with brass plugs, but barbed fittings can be installed for custom water routing applications.

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Integral ABS and ASC – new Riding Dynamic Control Systems for BMW Motorcycles

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 16-11-2010

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Entering its next generation, BMW Motorrad Integral ABS is taking a quantum leap in the process of evolution, advancing from a stand-alone solution acting only on the brakes into a fully networked all-round system. Offering the new generation of Integral ABS, BMW Motorrad provides the foundation for additional dynamic riding control systems with a reduction in technical requirements and features. And following the customer’s wishes, this new generation also opens up the option in future for further-reaching rider assistance functions. The first step in this direction is BMW Motorrad ASC Automatic Stability Control available as of 2007. This system serving to control drive spin on a production motorcycles is being introduced as an optional extra on the touring models in the BMW K and Boxer Series. Once again, therefore, BMW is acting as the pioneer in the introduction of advanced safety technologies on the motorcycle. This further enhances the leadership which BMW Motorrad has shown in the area of active safety for more than 15 years. Choosing the right development partner for both systems, BMW Motorrad obviously had to focus on that partner’s specific competence in control technology and the networking of functions within the vehicle. In recent years, major car suppliers have become aware of the technical challenges presented by the motorcycle with its specific riding dynamics and the growing potential for motorcycle control systems in the market. The decisive point in preselection of the development partner was the willingness and ability to develop specialised solutions suitable for use on BMW motorcycles. So taking this into account, joint development of the new generation of ABS brake technology started together with Continental-Teves in early 2003. Integral ABS. BMW Motorrad’s new Integral ABS technology has been developed separately from the previous system and the entire layout of the system has been newly conceived from the ground up. Capitalising on progress in technology in both hydraulics and electronics, the development engineers have succeeded in simplifying the architecture of the system while at the same time enhancing its functions to an even higher standard. The result is supreme stopping power and very short stopping distances even without electrical power assistance on the brakes.

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Kawasaki Ultra/ STX-R Billet Head Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 25-10-2010

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1) Remove stock head and clean the top surface of the cylinder. 2) Remove the stock water fittings from the stock head and install them in the ADA head in the same order. 3) Install all o’rings in the ADA billet head, use small amounts of grease to hold them in place, do not use super glue or silicone. 4) Apply a small amount of grease to the small (OR020) o’ring at the top of the dome. This will allow the dome to easily slip into the head shell. Be careful when turning the head upside down to install onto the cylinder, as the domes can slide out of the head shell. 5) Make sure all the o’rings are in place and place the head on top of the cylinder with the water outlets on the top side. You must be sure that none of the o’rings slip out of their groove, as this will cause an o’ring to get pinched and a water or compression leak could result. 6) Use the additional 8mm flat washers on the taller studs, along with the stock wash- ers. 7) Torque all of the nuts to 15ft/lbs, in a center-out criss-cross pattern. Now, torque them again to 18ft/lbs. 8) After the 1st time out riding the head should be re-torqued

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