how to tigthen a chain on a kawasaki er 6n

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MOTORCYCLE ROLLER CHAIN Maintenance and Lubrication

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 27-11-2010

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Cleaning and Relubrication Perhaps the largest contributor to shortened chain life is inadequate lubrica- tion. All working parts of a chain should be lubricated uniformly. The use of the highest viscosity oil that allows for flow between the link plates and coats pin-bushing areas will normally provide the greatest wear resistance. Apply oil to the upper edges of link plates. This allows for the greatest access of oil to pin-bushing joints. For open drives, excess lubrication on outer chain surfaces should be removed, since it will either be thrown off during operation or serve to collect foreign materials. If foreign objects or surplus lubrication accumulates on chain surfaces to the extent of making re-lubrication of the joints impossible, the chain must be cleaned. Standard roller chains may be cleaned by washing in kerosene or any other good petroleum-based solvent. WARNING: These solvents are flammable. Agitate the chain to assure penetration of the solvent and a thorough flushing of the pin-bushing areas. Drain off excess solvent and inspect bushings and pins for wear. Replace the chain if wear is excessive or parts are fractured or missing. O-ring chains may be cleaned externallyby washing in kerosene. Do not use any other cleaning agent or the O-rings may be damaged. When cleaning O- ring chain, clean only the external areas of the chain. Do not attempt to force kerosene into the pin-bush cavity. Do not try to repair a worn-out chain by replacing individual links. The pitch of the new links will be shorter and will most likely result in chain fatigue failure and/or severe sprocket damage. For chains which are still usable, soak them in SAE 40 or 50 automotive engine oil (without additives). Flexing the chain in oil will assure greater penetration of lubricant. Inspect and clean sprockets. If sprockets are worn or damaged, they should be replaced.Installing new chain on worn out sprockets will significantly shorten the chain’s service life. WARNING: always wear eye protection when assembling or disassembling chain

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Harley-Davidson CHAIN DRIVE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 15-04-2012

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1) Assemble & install the chain tensioner assembly over the primary chain as shown in figure 1. 2) Install the compensator sprocket with extender & spacer (numbers 5, 6, & 7, FIG 2)(#7 is not included in this kit), primary chain, chain tensioner, and clutch basket simultaneously onto the motor drive shaft & transmission main shaft. Rotate the chain drive slightly as needed to allow the splines to line-up. 3) Install the chain tensioner nut loosely on the chain tensioner bolt. 4) Install the sliding cam onto the compensator sprocket, & slide the compensating sprocket cover-assembly (#3) over the cam. 5) Apply 2 drops of Rivera “Red” thread-lock on the threads of the motor drive shaft, & install the motor nut loosely with the fingers at this time. The hex spacer (#7) and spacer (#2) as seen in fig.2 are not provided in Rivera Engineering’s chain drive kit. These components are required with some applications, and can be purchased from your local Harley-Davidson dealer. FIG 2 6) Apply 2 drops of Rivera “red” thread-lock on the threads of the transmission main-shaft and loosely install the clutch hub nut (left hand threads). 7) Place the HD “Primary Drive Locking Tool” HD-41214 on the primary chain as shown in figure XXX and tighten the motor sprocket nut to 150-165 foot-pounds. 8)Turn the locking tool 180 degrees and move it to the clutch sprocket. Tighten the clutch hub nut to 70-80 foot pounds (left- hand thread). Adjust chain tension so that the top strand has 5/8″- to-7/8″ of up and down play (cold drive train). Tighten the center bolt nut to 21-29 foot pounds of torque.

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Kawasaki KFX KLX 400 Camshafts Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 25-10-2010

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Remove the plug bolt from the back of the cam chain tensioner assembly. It is under pressure from the spring. Remove the spring and pin. Remove the bolts and tensioner assembly from the cylinder. Release the lock on the tensioner assembly and push the tensioner rod into the assembly so that it is fully retracted. Remove the eight 5mm Allen headed bolts that hold the cam caps in place. Remove the cam caps; be aware of the locating dowels in the caps to keep them from falling into the engine. It may be necessary to pry very lightly on the caps to lift them off their dowel pins. Do not use the cam lobe as the pry point. Lift the intake camshaft out of its pocket in the cylinder head casting. Remove the cam chain from the sprocket, set the stock camshaft aside. Lift the exhaust cam out of its pocket in the cylinder head casting and remove the chain from the sprocket. Do not drop the cam chain; dangle it over the side of the engine while keeping slight upward pressure on the chain to maintain its position on the drive sprocket on the crankshaft. Using assembly lube, lube the shim buckets and bearing surfaces for the camshafts in the cylinder head. Set the exhaust camshaft into the cylinder head casting while at the same time fitting the cam chain over the sprocket. Make sure that you keep all the cam chain slack to the back of the engine. Repeat the above process for the intake camshaft. Again, make sure you keep the chain slack to the cam chain tensioner side of the engine. Check to be sure the crankshaft is still at TDC. Check the location of the cam lobes. The camshafts are marked, and preset to 108-degree centers. If the lobes are not where they should be, adjust the positioning of the camshaft by rotating the sprocket one tooth on the chain. Do this until it is in the correct position as before you removed the camshafts. Check the positioning of the crankshaft for the TDC mark

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Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Upgrading the Suspension on the Kawasaki ER6-F/ N

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 30-11-2010

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Top fork is as removed. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Before removing the fork from the clamps on the yokes I loosened the fork top. Before removing the fork top the fork-slider was placed in a vice and the bottom bolt loosened….. … before finally being removed with the fork upside down. Because the springs were still in situ this gave sufficient tension on the damper-rod to prevent it from turning and allow the bolt to be removed. When I turned the fork the right-way up to remove the fork-top I did it over a container to catch the oil. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource All the OE components that will no longer be required. Left to right. Fork-top, spacer tube, washer, spring, damper-rod. Bottom bolts get re-used. Old and new, laid-out for comparison. The damper unit, minus spring and fork-top, drops inside the stanchion and slider. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Then the bolt goes back in, as tight as possible, to secure it. Top fork is done, second one awaits. Note the spring seat on the right, just below the spring. This drops over the damping rod after the oil has been added. The small locking-nut screws over the threaded part of the damping-rod next, all the way to the bottom. Spring drops in and then the fork-top screws on to the damping-rod as well, all the way down to the lock-nut which is used to secure it. At this point the stanchion is extended to the fork-top which is screwed in. Job done.

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Kawasaki Exhausts – ZX-6 ZX-10 Zx-14 Exhaust – Slip-ons INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 25-10-2010

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Our favorite exhaust options for Kawasaki ZX Ninjas – ZX-10,ZX-6r, and the new horsepower king, Zx-14.. Grab your horsepower today. We love Rob Muzzy and Muzzy Exhausts.Going back to Doug Chandler and Scott Russell, Muzzy has been synonomous with Kawasaki and performance – and for years, if you rode Kawasaki,and you were on the podium, Muzzy was on your exhaust. We also feature Arrow and Yoshimura exhausts for your ZX-6R, ZX-10 and ZX-14. We love the sound of a Yosh exhaust on any Kawasaki Ninja. Yoshimura Oval (RS-3) Race Slip-On for Kawasaki ZX14R 2006 The easiest and least expensive way to experience Yoshimura performance is with our Slip-On/Bolt-On lines. Bolt-On style bolts to the O. E. M. mid-pipe Slip-On style with its stainless steel easily attaches to the mid-pipe RS-1 is available where noted Usually, no jetting or re-programming is required and installation is a snap Hindle Stainless Exhaust High Head Pipes – Kawasaki ZX6R-RR 03-04 The worlds lightest stainless steel exhaust system. Increase horsepower and torque throughout the entire rpm range. Lightweight, strong stainless steel header design looks great and weighs less than stock headers. Available in low- and high-mo North Denver News http://northdenvernews.com Powered by Joomla! Generated: 19 October, 2010, 12:28 Hindle Stainless Exhaust Low Head Pipes – Kawasaki ZX9R 00-03 The worlds lightest stainless steel exhaust system. Increase horsepower and torque throughout the entire rpm range. Lightweight, strong stainless steel header design looks great and weighs less than stock headers. Available in low- and high-mo

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Yamaha YZ 250F Camshafts REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 30-12-2011

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Remove the 4 bolts that hold the exhaust cam cap in place, lift the cam cap off. It may be necessary to pry very lightly on the cap to lift it off its dowel pins. Do not use the cam lobes as the pry point. Be careful not to drop the dowels and also be careful to not lose the half moon shaped retainer for the bearing under the cam cap. Remove the 6 bolts that hold the intake camshaft cap and lift the cam cap off the camshaft, again, be careful to not drop the retainer or dowels. Lift the intake camshaft out of its pocket in the cylinder head casting. Remove the cam chain from the sprocket, set the stock camshaft aside. Lift the exhaust cam out of its pocket in the cylinder head casting and remove the chain from the sprocket. Do not drop the cam chain, dangle it over the side of the engine while keeping slight upward pressure on the chain to maintain its position on the drive sprocket on the crankshaft. Fit the half moon shaped retainers in the grooves of the Hot Cams camshaft bearings to ensure good fit, set retainers aside for the time. Using assembly lube, lube the shim buckets, bearing surfaces for the camshafts in the cylinder head, and pack some in the camshaft bearings. Set the exhaust cam into the cylinder head casting while at the same time fitting the cam chain over the sprocket. Make sure that you keep all the cam chain slack to the back of the engine. The cam chain pulls the camshaft sprockets in a counter clockwise direction and the slack of the chain must be kept on the cam chain tensioner side of the engine. The exhaust cam has two timing marks on it. When correctly installed one mark will be at the 9 o’clock position and the other mark will be at the 12 o’clock position. When correctly timed the mark at 9 o’clock will be aligned with the valve cover gasket surface. Repeat the above process for the intake camshaft. Again, make sure you keep the chain slack to the cam chain tensioner side of the engine. Check to be sure the crankshaft is still at TDC. The intake cam has two timing marks also. One at 12 o’clock and the other at 3 o’clock. When both cams are installed correctly, the valve cover gasket surface will form a straight line through the exhaust timing mark at 9 o’clock and the intake timing mark at 3 o’clock

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1982 Kawasaki KZ550C Electric Motorcycle Conversion Notes

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 03-12-2010

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Starting point: • 1982 Kawasaki KZ550C that I found in an alley near my house. Frame rust sanded and repainted. • Rebuilt front suspension ($25 for front fork oil seals, 1 weekend for repair) • Need-to-be-rebuilt front brake caliper • Need-to-be-replaced front master brake cylinder (expected ~$80) • Need-to-be-refurbished electrical wiring system and 12V battery • Working rear brake • Flat rear tire, patched with fix-a-flat (temporary repair), 77″ circumference. • In-tact 530 size 62″ chain with 36 tooth driven sprocket • Miscellaneous spare parts from 1978 Kawasaki KZ450, most of which fit on the 1982 frame, including an ignition switch and key. I started with a chassis I found in an alley near my house. It was in rough shape and needed some refurbishment before I could start the conversion. Most of refurbishment steps are listed above in bullets. In addition to the repainting and repair of important aspects of the bike, I also needed to remove the IC engine components and the grease caked on from years of IC use. The Clymer manual for this bike was helpful in this process, which was about $18 from [13]. Steps for removing the engine were as follows. I removed the seat and the gas tank. I removed the electrical system wiring and 12V battery holder. I then removed the carburetors (which took a lot of pushing and shoving) and air filter box. I then removed the drive socket cover and removed the drive socket from the engine drive shaft. This allowed me to slip the chain off of the drive socket after loosening the rear wheel to put slack into the chain. I slipped the chain off and let it rest on the rear wheel swing arm and drained the old motor oil. I then removed all of the engine mounting bolts and pushed the entire engine out of the right side of the bike. This took a lot of effort but it is possible to remove the engine without removing the piston heads as recommended in the Clymer manual. The engine weights about 60-70 lbs, so it was possible to handle with one person. I suggest using a flat car jack to help with engine removal. I will eventually sell the IC parts through Ebay

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Kawasaki KVF650/ 700, KSV 700 Camshaft Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 29-04-2012

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Liberally apply assembly lube to every surface of the camshaft. Install the camshaft into the cylinder head (the lobes should be pointed down) and align the decompressor shaft dowels with the weight arms. Install one of the camshaft sprocket holder bolts and tighten to less than finger tight, you should be able to move the camshaft very slightly back and forth, roll the crank over until the other bolt hole is exposed and insert the sprocket bolt and tighten to less than finger tight. Install the cam chain tensioner assembly, do not install the spring, spring dowel, washer, and bolt. Using the spring from the cam chain tensioner very slowly push the tensioner shaft in until the cam chain slack has just been taken out, this is witnessed by the very slight lifting of the opposite end of the cam out of the cylinder head cam journal, do not over tighten the cam chain at this point, if you do, remove the tensioner assembly and retract the plunger again and start over. (If it stays too tight it will stretch the cam chain prematurely and cause cam sprocket damage when the engine is assembled) Roll the camshaft toward the back of the machine (clockwise) loading the sprocket bolts against the back of the sprocket bolt holes, while holding the camshaft in that direction, tighten the sprocket mounting bolt to 14 ft/lb of torque. Rotate the engine in the opposite direction that you rotated it earlier and align the TDC mark, tighten the other sprocket-mounting bolt to 14 ft/lb of torque. Verify the cam timing and crankshaft TDC marks are in alignment

CCS- 100 ELECTRONIC CRUISE CONTROL INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 10-11-2010

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UNDER HOOD INSTALLATION Connecting the Cruise Control Cable to the Throttle NOTE: Prior to attaching servo cable to throttle, locate an accessible area to mount the cruise control servo, but do not mount it. Leave the servo in this area (unmounted) and route cable to throttle attachment area. CAUTION: Attach the cruise control cable so that it parallels the existing throttle cable as nearly as possible. Choose a mounting method from the figures below: Attachment area for securing cable Bead Chain Coupling Sleeve (#23) Bead Chain Coupling (#24) 3 BEAD CONNECTOR FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FORD LINKAGE ADAPTOR Rubber Ring WIRE LOOP FOR PULLEY Carburetor Existing Snap-On Throttle Arm On Vehicle FIG. 2 SNAP-ON THROTTLE ARM MOUNT FIG. 3 CLAMP-ON THROTTLE ARM MOUNT Determine a suitable point on the throttle linkage to mount the cable connector. The mounting point chosen should have between 1-1/2″ to 2″ total linkage travel. It must operate smoothly by hand. There should be at least 5 beads between the throttle connector and servo cable end. The cable must pull in a straight line from throttle linkage. Some vehicles that do not have enough total linkage travel have to be connected at the accelerator pedal. The bead chain and servo cable end must be inserted into the bead chain connector. Then the bead chain coupling sleeve must slide over bead chain connector to insure that the end will not hang in the connector. FIG. 1 Cable Bead Chain Eyelet Connector (#25) Pull off Throttle Arm and Insert Bead Chain Connector between it and Carburetor Arm. Be sure additional thickness of adaptor does not bind linkage. 20° Bead Chain Eyelet Connector (#25) Cable Must Be within 20° of same angle as Throttle Rod Throttle Cable Throttle Wire Loop (#29) Barrel Wire Adaptor (#30) WIRE BARREL FOR PULLEY FIG. 5 FIG. 4

Yamaha YZ400/426F Camshafts REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 01-01-2012

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Cleanliness is always a good place to start. Make sure the motorcycle is cleaned thoroughly before you start. It would be advisable to use an engine degreaser on the frame and the engine. This will ensure a clean engine during the assembly process and less of a chance of thread damage and/or dirt contamination in the engine during reassembly. And as always, replace any fiber-based gasket that was moved in any way, i.e.: cam chain tensioner. You will need basic hand tools and a torque wrench, machine towels (rags), some cleaning solvent, and a cam chain tensioner gasket. And the Hot Cams’ Degree Wheel Kit if you so desire. We will start by removing the tank and seat, top engine mount, and the cam cover. Remove the crankshaft cap and timing hole cap on the left engine case cover. Remove the spark plug. Rotate the engine in a counter clockwise (CCW) direction. Position the engine on top dead center (TDC) using the mark on the flywheel or better yet a degree wheel using a positive stop. Be sure to notice that the intake valves were the last to move, this will ensure the engine of being on “true” TDC. True top dead center occurs when both the intake and exhaust valve are closed when the piston is at TDC. This is technically the end of the compression stroke and the Page 1
beginning of the power stroke. The “artificial” TDC is during the overlap when both the intake and exhaust valves would be open. Note the positioning of the cam lobes (their included angle will be close to 170 degrees), this will help during the installation of your new Hot Cams camshafts Remove the cap bolt on the end of the cam chain tensioner block, be aware of the copper washer. Release the spring tension on the cam chain tensioner by turning the flat blade screw slot inside the adjuster block in a clockwise (CW) direction; it will lock in the retracted position. Remove the two 8mm headed bolts that hold the cam chain tensioner to the cylinder block. Remove and discard the gasket. Remove the 4 bolts that hold the exhaust cam cap in place, lift the cam cap off. It may be necessary to pry very lightly on the cap to lift it off its dowel pins. Do not use the cam lobes as the pry point. Be careful not to drop the dowels and also be careful to not lose the half moon shaped retainer for the bearing under the cam cap. Remove the 6 bolts that secure the intake cam cap and lift the cam cap off the camshaft, again, be careful to not drop the retainer or dowels. Lift the intake camshaft out of its pocket in the cylinder head casting. Remove the cam chain from the sprocket, set the stock camshaft aside. Lift the exhaust camshaft out of its pocket in the cylinder head casting and remove the chain from the sprocket. Do not drop the cam chain, dangle it over the side of the engine while keeping slight upward pressure on the chain to maintain its position on the drive sprocket on the crankshaft

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