kawasaki mule electric steering failure

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KAWASAKI MULE Electric Steering Installation Manual And Removal

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 05-05-2012

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Remove plastic center cap on steering wheel by prying off with a small screwdriver. Remove steering wheel nut and remove steering wheel by pulling up on wheel. If wheel is tight have a partner tap on the shaft while pulling up on wheel. Note: Do not mushroom threads on shaft. Remove all screws that retain dash to body of vehicle. Disconnect all electrical connections at back of dash. Mark all wires to ensure easy install. Remove lower steering shaft bolt at rack and pinion. Remove upper bolt at base of steering column. Remove the 2 bolts that retain the steering column to the frame and remove the column and the shaft assembly. Remove lower u-joint on steering column shaft & replace it with supplied u-joint. There is a welded wire retainer on the lower dash tube where the electric motor will sit. You will need to grind off this piece and smooth. Remove the master cylinder bolt closest to the driver side and discard bolt. Your motor and module has been shipped together bolted to the bracket. It is important to follow the install sequence to ensure a proper installation. The lower shaft on the steering motor is marked on the shaft and on the motor. These marks must not be changed. If you remove the shaft it needs to be installed back in the same spot.

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STEERING GEAR/ STEERING WHEEL REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION

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Filed Under (Uncategorized) by admin on 05-10-2011

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TEERING GEAR/STEERING WHEEL REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Page 3 of 4 STEERING GEAR/STEERING WHEEL INSTALLATION PROCEDURES (Cont’d) 2. Center spiral cable. a. Turn the cable counterclockwise by hand until it becomes harder to turn. b. Then rotate the cable clockwise about 2.5 or 3 turns to align the marks. (See Fig. 4) 3. Install the steering wheel. a. Align the matchmarks on the wheel and steering main shaft. b. Temporarily tighten the wheel set nut. c. Connect the spiral cable connector. 4. Bleed Power Steering System (when applicable). 5. Check steering wheel center point. 6. Torque steering wheel set nut. See the applicable vehicle’s repair manual for the torque specification. 7. Install and center steering wheel pad. NOTICE: Make sure the pad is centered and installed to the specified torque. If the pad has been dropped, or there are cracks, dents or other defects in the case or connector, replace the wheel pad with a new one. When installing the pad, take care that the wiring does not interfere with other parts and is not pinched between other parts. a) Connect the airbag wiring connector. b) Install the pad after confirming that torx screws are in the screw case. c) Using a torx socket, torque the screws to the specification in the vehicle’s Repair Manual. (See Fig. 5) d) Install the steering wheel lower cover

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Kawasaki Teryx Electric Steering Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 29-04-2012

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installation Instructions for Kawasaki Teryx 1. Before installation, center steering wheel and verify tires are straight. 2. Begin by removing all Phillips screws retaining the plastic hood to the front grill, headlights, and frame structure and remove front clip assembly. 3. Remove plastic shroud by removing the 4 phillips screws that retain it to the frame. 4. There are 2 bolts that hold the steering column tube in place and you need to reach up under frame work to get to them. They are 14 mm and you need a box and open end wrench to access them. Loosen the upper one and remove the lower one. Remove the pinch bolt at the column shaft and u-joint. Remove the lower pinch bolt at the rack and u-joint and while tilting the column up and down remove the stock steering shaft.
5. Once the shaft is removed, you are ready for installation. Your bracket and motor has come completely assembled as shown below. You will need to remove the lower shaft from the motor to install it. After removal of the shaft you will need to loosen the 3 mounting bolts from the bracket to the motor to allow clearance for the bracket to slide over the frame piece where it will mount

Tacoma Power Steering Pump Improving Power Steering Reservoir modification

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Filed Under (Toyota Manuals) by admin on 02-10-2011

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For my SAS I decided to add hydraulic steering assist as it comes in real handy for rock crawling. I got the Redneck Ram setup from the folks at West Texas Off-road that includes rebuilding an earlier IFS steering box along with drilling and tapping the box for the included ram. One of the down sides of adding a ram is that it slows the steering down because the stock steering pump has to supply the added volume for the hydraulic ram. Another is that it creates a fluid volume change in the system reservoir that needs to be compensated for in some way. After doing some reading on the West Texas site about how to go about modifying a Saginaw pump and reading up on earlier Toyota pump mods for steering assist setups on the Pirate board, I decided to give it whirl and see what I could do about the Tacoma pump. Chuck Gardella was kind enough to supply me with a blown pump that I could rebuild and submit to my endless fiddling and tinkering. I plan to give him my pump in return when I get this one done and installed. You need to do something to allow for more room in the reservoir for the standard hydraulic ram assist setup so I decided to tackle the reservoir first. The reason you need the extra space is because the ram is unbalanced. That is there is a rod on one side of the cylinder and not on the other side so the volume of the fluid has to change in the system to account for the volume of the rod as it travels back and forth. I calculated the volume of the rod that I have at full stroke to be about 2 oz or so. This would equate to plus or minus up to 2 oz. in the pump reservoir. Well first off, it’s no wonder why so many folks boil their steering pumps over with heavy wheeling and have so many other steering problems. The stock power steering reservoir doesn’t even rate pint sized

Kawasaki Mule Lift Kit Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 04-05-2012

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Front Lift Installation 1. Ensuring that the parking brake is set, place jack under center of the Mule front end and lift until front wheels clear the ground. Be careful to support Mule properly so that it is secure, but so that the A-arms and struts can droop to full extension. 2. Remove front wheels. 3. If applicable, remove the heater to allow access to the strut mount behind the heater coil. Heater 4. Starting with the left side (driver side), remove the cotter pin and castle nut that secures the strut to the strut mount. Castle Nut & Pen 5. Push bolt through the bolthole, taking care not to damage the brake line that is attached to the bolt. If you are having difficulty removing the bolt, you may have to remove the brake lines that are attached to the front brakes. In this case refer to owners manual for removing brake lines. Screwdriver NOTE: Keep in mind that if you remove the brake lines you must bleed your brakes according to operator’s manual. 6. Once the bottom of the strut has been loosened, then unbolt the top of the strut. The nuts securing the top strut can be located in the dash of the Mule on the left and right sides. In most cases these nuts are easily accessible, but you may have to remove the glove box or heater coils, depending on the model and options purchased with the Mule.

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Toyota and Lexus Clogged Power Steering Reservoir Filter

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Filed Under (Toyota Manuals) by admin on 02-10-2011

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Clogged Power Steering Reservoir Filter – Toyota & Lexus Toyota and Lexus vehicles with power steering. Noise coming from the power steering pump or reduced assist from the power steering system. Noise or reduced assist may be caused by restriction in the power steering fluid reservoir. Most Toyota/Lexus-style reservoirs have a filter screen at the bottom. Over a period of time this filter could get clogged causing the restriction of fluid. Replace any hose that shows signs of cracking or internal deterioration. Thoroughly flush the power steering system; then remove the reservoir for cleaning as follows: 1. Clean the exterior and interior of reservoir with new power steering fluid or suitable solvent. 2. Blow off the filter screen using pressurized air until restriction or clog is removed. 3. Using a flashlight, check to make sure that the filter screen is free of debris. Note: Contamination may be an indication of internal breakdown of hoses, which must be replaced before operating the vehicle. Failure to replace bad hoses could damage both the pump and steering unit. 4. Reinstall reservoir, referring to the service manual for tightening specs and bleeding procedures.

Motorcycle Derived Steering / Suspension Systems

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 29-11-2010

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1. Examine the handlebars and fork yokes. 2. Turn the steering from lock to lock with the steered wheel both on a turning plate and clear of the ground. Cont’d Reason for Rejection 1. A handlebar or fork yoke a. deformed b. fractured c. cracked d. excessively corroded e. clamps not tight, or any bolt loose or missing f. handgrips missing or not secure to handlebars g. handlebar flexible mounting excessively deteriorated. 2. a. any fouling or restriction of the free movement of the steering from lock to lock b. handlebar grip/s or handlebar mounted control/s have no clearance with any other part of the machine when the steering is placed on either full lock c. steering movement excessively stiff or rough Reason for Rejection 5 does not apply to fork gaiters or shrouds. . Cont’d Method of Inspection 3. Examine the steering damper. 4. Examine the steering head bearings. 5. Examine the front fork assembly. Cont’d Reason for Rejection 3. A steering damper a. insecure b. ineffective c. impairing the steering action. 4. Excessive free play in the steering head bearings. 5. A fork assembly component which is a. missing b. loose c. cracked d. excessively bent, misaligned, corroded, worn, or has excessive free play between the sliding members of the forks, the pivot bearings or bushes e. restricted in operation f. fouling

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Steering Stem Nut Installation Instructions & Owners Manual

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 26-11-2010

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Sport Bike Damper Kit Installation Instructions DISCLAIMER: All GPR Sport Bike damper kits are manufactured to be used ONLY w/ the stock top triple clamp and frame. If either is modded, aftermarket or crash damaged, the kit will not install properly and GPR will not be held responsible for the consequences of improper installation due to this or any other improper mounting or modifying. The provided instructions must be followed precisely, as failure to do so can result in the GPR damper kit being installed incorrectly. An improper installation may lead to a variety of undesirable steering problems. Please take your time and carefully follow the installation instructions. As always, give us a call if you have any questions, we’re more than happy to assist you in getting the damper kit mounted on your bike properly 1. Remove the stock Steering Stem Nut (SSN) and washer from the stock top triple clamp steering stem. Carefully set the stock nut aside, as you may be using it later. Bikes requiring a specific GPR SSN to replace the stock SSN are listed at the end of this installation sheet. If your bike is on the chart, throw you stock SSN in the toolbox along w/ the washer, as you may need it at a later date if for any reason you need to remove the GPR kit from your bike. Stock SSN’s that are either ‘domed’ at the top or ‘flanged’ at the bottom will definitely NOT work, may lead to problems and should NOT be reinstalled during the baseplate installation. See #2 below for further instructions about both SSN/Steering stem and arm clearance issues 2. With the stock SSN and washer removed, place the GPR Baseplate over the steering stem on the top triple clamp and reinstall either the stock SSN or the GPR SSN provided. Torque SSN down to the recommended specs as per the owner’s manual for your particular bikes make and model. NEVER reinstall the stock washer that came on the bike! The baseplate is now your new washer. If you do accidentally use the stock washer, the arm on the stabilizer will most likely ‘rub’ on the nut. It will be too high, potentially locking the steering and handlebars, thus making your bike un steerable and unridable. DO NOT ride your bike until all installation steps have been completed and you can visually verify that there is clearance between the arm of the stabilizer and the steering stem and/or SSN. Once the installation is complete, at the #1 setting you

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Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Upgrading the Suspension on the Kawasaki ER6-F/ N

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 30-11-2010

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Top fork is as removed. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Before removing the fork from the clamps on the yokes I loosened the fork top. Before removing the fork top the fork-slider was placed in a vice and the bottom bolt loosened….. … before finally being removed with the fork upside down. Because the springs were still in situ this gave sufficient tension on the damper-rod to prevent it from turning and allow the bolt to be removed. When I turned the fork the right-way up to remove the fork-top I did it over a container to catch the oil. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource All the OE components that will no longer be required. Left to right. Fork-top, spacer tube, washer, spring, damper-rod. Bottom bolts get re-used. Old and new, laid-out for comparison. The damper unit, minus spring and fork-top, drops inside the stanchion and slider. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Then the bolt goes back in, as tight as possible, to secure it. Top fork is done, second one awaits. Note the spring seat on the right, just below the spring. This drops over the damping rod after the oil has been added. The small locking-nut screws over the threaded part of the damping-rod next, all the way to the bottom. Spring drops in and then the fork-top screws on to the damping-rod as well, all the way down to the lock-nut which is used to secure it. At this point the stanchion is extended to the fork-top which is screwed in. Job done.

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1982 Kawasaki KZ550C Electric Motorcycle Conversion Notes

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 03-12-2010

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Starting point: • 1982 Kawasaki KZ550C that I found in an alley near my house. Frame rust sanded and repainted. • Rebuilt front suspension ($25 for front fork oil seals, 1 weekend for repair) • Need-to-be-rebuilt front brake caliper • Need-to-be-replaced front master brake cylinder (expected ~$80) • Need-to-be-refurbished electrical wiring system and 12V battery • Working rear brake • Flat rear tire, patched with fix-a-flat (temporary repair), 77″ circumference. • In-tact 530 size 62″ chain with 36 tooth driven sprocket • Miscellaneous spare parts from 1978 Kawasaki KZ450, most of which fit on the 1982 frame, including an ignition switch and key. I started with a chassis I found in an alley near my house. It was in rough shape and needed some refurbishment before I could start the conversion. Most of refurbishment steps are listed above in bullets. In addition to the repainting and repair of important aspects of the bike, I also needed to remove the IC engine components and the grease caked on from years of IC use. The Clymer manual for this bike was helpful in this process, which was about $18 from [13]. Steps for removing the engine were as follows. I removed the seat and the gas tank. I removed the electrical system wiring and 12V battery holder. I then removed the carburetors (which took a lot of pushing and shoving) and air filter box. I then removed the drive socket cover and removed the drive socket from the engine drive shaft. This allowed me to slip the chain off of the drive socket after loosening the rear wheel to put slack into the chain. I slipped the chain off and let it rest on the rear wheel swing arm and drained the old motor oil. I then removed all of the engine mounting bolts and pushed the entire engine out of the right side of the bike. This took a lot of effort but it is possible to remove the engine without removing the piston heads as recommended in the Clymer manual. The engine weights about 60-70 lbs, so it was possible to handle with one person. I suggest using a flat car jack to help with engine removal. I will eventually sell the IC parts through Ebay

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