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Kawasaki Voyager Installation And Removal Manual

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 25-10-2010

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Review entire installation manual Remove saddle bags and rear fender cover Modify rear fender bolt slots Install receiver hitch and double check all bolts Remount saddle bags Assemble InstaTrike hitch cart Attach InstaTrike to motorcycle via receiver hitch Attach leanstop brace bolts to receiver hitch Align InstaTrike wheels Double check all bolts for tightness Test ride InstaTrike slowly in an open area to familiarize yourself with handling characteristics Receiver Hitch Installation INSTALL ALL BOLTS AND BRACKETS LOOSLEY UNTIL ALL COMPONENTS ARE IN PLACE! 1) Place motorcycle on its center stand 2) Remove saddle bags and rear fender 3) At the bottom of the rear fender locate two bolt slots. (bolts were removed from these when rear fender was removed) Open the front end of these slots in order to remount fender. 4) Replace bottom fender bolts about 2 or 3 turns. This is necessary to be able to remount rear fender. 5) Attach bracket A to motorcycle. Locate two threaded holes (6mm) near the top of the sub frame. Bolt top of bracket A to these holes. ( bolts provided ) 6) Attach bracket B ( left side ) / C ( right side ) to motorcycle by replacing the bolt that holds the muffler to the frame and vibration absorber with the new bolt provided. Bracket B/C mounts on the outside of the large chrome washer. 7) Attach brackets A, B, C to the hitch ( top ) 8) Replace rear fender 9) Attach brackets D and E to the motorcycle sub frame with U- bolts provided. Attach brackets to hitch. 10) Tighten all bolts and double check. 11) Reinstall saddle bags

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Vengeance Motorcycle Specification And Owner's Manual

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Filed Under (Vengeance) by admin on 20-11-2010

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Vengeance Maxis • Vengeance Raven • Vengeance Banshee • Vengeance Whiplash • Hotrod Drifter • Hotrod CalChop • Hotrod Teacher • Hotrod Bone Shifting Gears Starting off and changing gears requires coordination of the clutch and throttle and gearshift lever. If you don’t do things right, the amount of control you have over the bike is lessened. To start off, pull in the clutch, shift into first gear, roll on the throttle a little, and ease out the clutch. You will become familiar with the friction zone (that’s where the clutch begins to take hold and move the bike), and you add a bit more throttle. You don’t want to stall the engine, nor do you want to over-rev it. There’s a sweet spot in there; find it. Shift while traveling in a straight line. Shifting in a curve is not good practice, and something to be avoided. Become familiar with the sound of your engine, so you can tell when you should shift without looking at your instruments. When you downshift to a lower gear, you should (in one swift, smooth movement) be able to squeeze the clutch, rev the engine a little to let it catch the lower gear smoothly, and shift down. When you come to a stop in traffic, leave the bike in first gear with the clutch disengaged (just in case you want to accelerate out of there in a hurry). Who knows what may be coming up behind you. Braking Don’t ever forget: The front brake on your motorcycle can supply as much as 70 percent or more of your stopping power. The single most important thing you can learn about braking is to use that front brake every single time you want to slow down. Turning When you are riding along the road, you lean a motorcycle into a turn. Learning to lean is an essential part of riding a motorcycle. It is a normal function of the bike when you are changing its path of travel – and quite different from turning the steering wheel of your car. To get the motorcycle to lean in a normal turn, press the handlebar in the direction of the turn and maintain slight pressure on that handlebar to take you smoothly through that particular turn. In other words: press right to go right; press left to go left. Your instincts to keep the motorcycle on a smooth path while keeping it from falling over usually take care of this without you even noticing it. (Demonstrate to yourself how a motorcycle moves by pressing a handlebar slightly while traveling in a straight line. The motorcycle will move in the direction of the handlebar you pushed.) • Slow down before you enter the turn; look as far ahead as possible through the turn. • Keep your feet on the pegs, and grip the gas tank with your knees. • Lean with the motorcycle; don’t try to sit perpendicular to the road while the motorcycle is leaning over. • Keep an even throttle through the turn, or even accelerate a little bit. Checking the Bike before the Ride It’s not fun to have things go wrong on a motorcycle, but if you spend a minute before you go off on a ride, you can increase the chances that nothing will.

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1300 Yamaha V-Star Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 07-11-2010

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1) Place motorcycle on a firm level surface and secure in a upright position. 2) Remove saddle bags and saddle bag hardware (Tourer model only) Also remove rear riders pegs (Tourer model requires removal of rear footpeg offset hardware as well) 3) Attach bracket A (right) / B (left) to rear footpeg attachment point using new bolts provided. Remount footpegs/saddlebag hardware over top of brackets A/B. NOTE: Do not attach leveling stand bracket at this time 4) Attach bracket C(right) / D(left) to rear fender sub frame using new bolts provided. (Tourer model only – Saddle bag hardware mounts to the outside of brackets C/D. Brackets C/D mount between chrome side rail and saddlebag hardware.) NOTE: Brackets C/D have welded spacers which attach in toward rear fender 5) Attach top of Bracket E(right) / F(left) to rear of brackets C/D. Brackets E/F mount to the inside of brackets C/D. NOTE: Use ½ inch spacer between brackets E/F and C/D on Tourer model ONLY
6) Attach rear of brackets A/B to TOP of forward hitch arms. Attach bottom to brackets E/F to rear hitch plate. 7) Carefully tighten all bolts at this time ensuring hitch is square with motorcycle. Hitch Bracket Identification Leveling stand screw jack installation 1) Attach leveling stand brackets to brackets A and B 2) Thread right side screw jack into threaded hole on leveling stand bracket attached to bracket A sand adjust leveling jack bolt out. 3) Push motorcycle over from left side until right screw jack is touching floor. 4) Thread left side screw jack into threaded hole on leveling stand bracket attached to bracket B and adjust out until motorcycle will rest upright on both screw jacks. 5) Adjust screw jacks until motorcycle is level. 6) After InstaTrike is attached to or removed from receiver hitch, be sure to remove leveling stands and leveling stand brackets. CAUTION – Use screw jacks to hold motorcycle upright and level ONLY. Do not lift motorcycle with screw jacks. CAUTION – Use care when installing screw jacks. Be certain that motorcycle is always in a stable balanced position.
INSTALLATION OF THE TOW-PAC HITCH CART. 1. Place your motorcycle on a smooth flat surface, like a garage floor, and install leveling stands. Install right leveling stand first. Carefully raise motorcycle off of side stand and install left leveling stand. Caution – Use leveling stands to level motorcycle ONLY. Do not raise motorcycle with stands Caution – Be certain that motorcycle is always in a stable balanced position when installing leveling stands. 2. Assemble the axles, tires and wheels, and fenders onto the tow- pac hitch cart. 3. Carefully align the tow-pac hitch cart’s hitch mount with the receiver hitch on the motorcycle. Now push the hitch mount into the receiver hitch. (this might be a little difficult until you get use to doing it. Removing the paint from the hitch mount and applying a little grease will help.) 4. Place the hitch pin through the receiver hitch and hitch mount ( alignment plate ). Install and tighten the tension bolt

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Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Upgrading the Suspension on the Kawasaki ER6-F/ N

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 30-11-2010

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Top fork is as removed. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Before removing the fork from the clamps on the yokes I loosened the fork top. Before removing the fork top the fork-slider was placed in a vice and the bottom bolt loosened….. … before finally being removed with the fork upside down. Because the springs were still in situ this gave sufficient tension on the damper-rod to prevent it from turning and allow the bolt to be removed. When I turned the fork the right-way up to remove the fork-top I did it over a container to catch the oil. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource All the OE components that will no longer be required. Left to right. Fork-top, spacer tube, washer, spring, damper-rod. Bottom bolts get re-used. Old and new, laid-out for comparison. The damper unit, minus spring and fork-top, drops inside the stanchion and slider. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Then the bolt goes back in, as tight as possible, to secure it. Top fork is done, second one awaits. Note the spring seat on the right, just below the spring. This drops over the damping rod after the oil has been added. The small locking-nut screws over the threaded part of the damping-rod next, all the way to the bottom. Spring drops in and then the fork-top screws on to the damping-rod as well, all the way down to the lock-nut which is used to secure it. At this point the stanchion is extended to the fork-top which is screwed in. Job done.

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Motorcycle LED lights RENEGADE LIGHTS Disconnection Guide

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 29-01-2011

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1. Make sure your bike is cool and parked on a flat secure surface! 2. Find your battery (you may have to remove your seat or side covers in order to get to your battery) Disconnect the NEGATIVE ( -) cable. Negative battery cable must be disconnected from the battery in order to avoid safety hazards! Be sure as you disconnect the Negative cable that it does not touch or make contact with your Positive terminal 3. Disconnect the fuse holder from the battery – both the positive ( +) and negative ( -) sides. 4. Cut the wire to the light that is not working with the side cutters. 5. At the problem light twist the light case back and forth slowly and then pull firmly, DO NOT yank to remove from the motorcycle. 6. If the motorcycle led light does not come off easily, repeat the twisting motion back and froth until you feel the light loosen – then pull. 7. Pull the motorcycle led light away from the motorcycle slowly until the cut end of wire falls free. 8. If you will NOT be using your motorcycle until the new lights arrive, you may stop at this step. SAFETY POINT: Otherwise, where you cut the wire, you need to dead end or tape the cut wire. This will keep it from shorting out until the new motorcycle led light is installed. 9. Reconnect fuse holder to battery. 10. Reconnect the battery and then install the seat. 11. Return the motorcycle led light or lights to Renegade Lights along with Warranty Return Policy Form. 12. Renegade Lights will return your new motorcycle led lights along with instructions for installing them.

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Ural Motorcycle Repair Manual

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Filed Under (Ural) by admin on 11-11-2010

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FLUID CAPACITIES TOURIST & -10 Models Sportsman Solo Gasoline tank 19 L / 5 Gal 19L / 5 Gal 18.5 L / 4.9 Gal Reserve 2L / 0.5 gal 2L / 0.5 gal 2L- / 0.5 Gal Engine crankcase 2 L / 2 qt. + 3.6 oz. 2.0L / 2.11 qt 2 L / 2 qt. + 3.6 oz. Gearbox 0.9L / 1 qt 0.9L / 1 qt 0.9L / 1 qt Final drive 110 ml / 3.85 oz. 150 ml / 5.25 oz. 110 ml / 3.85 oz. Telescopic Forks (-10 & solo models) N/A on Tourist N/A on Sportsman 135 ml / 4.56 oz. Shock Absorbers 105 ml / 3.55 105 ml / 3.55 oz 105 ml / 3.55 oz
RUNNING GEAR TOURIST / SPORTSMAN SOLO Frame Tubular welded Rear wheel suspension Swing arm with hydraulic spring shock absorbers Sidecar: same as -40 Solo: Lower spring rate Front fork Leading link Telescopic spring Sidecar Cushioned body (on rubber cushions) and wheel on long-lever suspension with hydraulic spring shock absorber N/A Brakes Shoe-type with mechanical drive on front, rear and sidecar wheels, front wheel has dual cams. Tires 4″ x 19″ Front & Side: 22 psi cold Rear: 36 psi cold 3.5″ x 18″ Solo: Front 25 psi cold Rear: 32 psi cold -10′s: Front & side: 25 psi cold Rear: 36 psi cold CLEARANCES mm in Valves with engine cold 0.05 0.002 Between spark plug electrodes 0.50 – 0.65 0.020 – 0.026 Between brake shoes and drum 0.3 – 0.70 0.012 – 0.028 Backlash between tooth faces of bevel gears in final drive 0.1 – 0.3 0.004 Between rotor and ignition pickup 0.3 – 0.4 .012 – .016 FREE TRAVEL / ADJUSTMENTS mm in Hand brake control lever 5 – 8 0.2 – 0.3 Clutch control lever 5 – 8 0.2 – 0.3 Foot brake drive pedal ¼ of full stroke of pedal, 25 – 30 1.0 – 1.2 Toe-in throughout motorcycle center distance (exception: Sportsman 0 ° toe-in) 10 N/A Angle of motorcycle inclination to vertical plane (camber angle of rear wheel) 1° away from sidecar N/A Headlight installation (with motorcycle laden) horizontal (high beam) TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS Metric (in repair manual) US Equivalent Location on Bike 29 to 33 Nm 22 ft/lb. to 30 ft/lb. cylinder heads 22 to 25 kgf-m 175 ft/lb. to 185 ft/lb. fly wheel tightening screws 3.8 to 4.2 kgf-m 30 ft/lb. to 40 ft/lb. cylinder 2.1 to 3.0 kgf-m top 14 ft/lb. to 22 ft/lb. shock absorber 3.6 to 5.0 kgf-m bottom 28 ft/lb. to 36 ft/lb. shock absorber 3.0 to 3.4 kgf-m 22 ft/lb. to 26 ft/lb. bearing nut 3.0 to 3-4 kgf-m 22 ft/lb. to 26 ft/lb. final drive to swing arm bolts 1.6 to 1.8 kgf-m 12 ft/lb. to 14 ft/lb. oil pump bolt .8 to 1.0 kgf-m 5 ft/lb. to 8 ft/lb. engine sump 1.4 to 1.8 kgf-m 10 ft/lb. to 14 ft/lb. final drive case nuts 7 to 9 kgf-m 50 ft/lb. to 66 ft/lb. nut fastening the pinion bearing 2.2 to 2.8 kgf-m 16 ft/lb. to 20 ft/lb. reverse gear brake lever 1.8 to 2.0 kgf-m 14 ft/lb. to 16 ft/lb. generator gear nut 14.0 to 16.8 kgf-m 100 ft/lb to 120 ft/lb steering stem nut CONVERSIONS To convert from mm to in, divide by 25.4 (there are 25.4 mm per inch). To convert from liters to gallons, divide by 3.785 (there are 3.78 liters per gallon). To convert from liters to quarts, multiply by 1.056 (there are 1.056 quarts per liter). To convert from liters to pints, multiply by 2.112 (there are 2.112 pints per liter). To convert from km to miles, multiply by .62 (there is .62 mile per km). To convert from km/hr to mph, multiply by .62. To convert from Newton-meter (Nm) to inch-pound, multiply by 8.86. To convert from cm 3 (cc) to pints, divide by 473 (there are 473 cc per pint). To convert Celsius to Fahrenheit, F° = C° x 1.8 = 32°. To convert Fahrenheit to Celsius,C ° = (F° – 32° ) divided by 1.8

Kawasaki Exhausts – ZX-6 ZX-10 Zx-14 Exhaust – Slip-ons INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 25-10-2010

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Our favorite exhaust options for Kawasaki ZX Ninjas – ZX-10,ZX-6r, and the new horsepower king, Zx-14.. Grab your horsepower today. We love Rob Muzzy and Muzzy Exhausts.Going back to Doug Chandler and Scott Russell, Muzzy has been synonomous with Kawasaki and performance – and for years, if you rode Kawasaki,and you were on the podium, Muzzy was on your exhaust. We also feature Arrow and Yoshimura exhausts for your ZX-6R, ZX-10 and ZX-14. We love the sound of a Yosh exhaust on any Kawasaki Ninja. Yoshimura Oval (RS-3) Race Slip-On for Kawasaki ZX14R 2006 The easiest and least expensive way to experience Yoshimura performance is with our Slip-On/Bolt-On lines. Bolt-On style bolts to the O. E. M. mid-pipe Slip-On style with its stainless steel easily attaches to the mid-pipe RS-1 is available where noted Usually, no jetting or re-programming is required and installation is a snap Hindle Stainless Exhaust High Head Pipes – Kawasaki ZX6R-RR 03-04 The worlds lightest stainless steel exhaust system. Increase horsepower and torque throughout the entire rpm range. Lightweight, strong stainless steel header design looks great and weighs less than stock headers. Available in low- and high-mo North Denver News http://northdenvernews.com Powered by Joomla! Generated: 19 October, 2010, 12:28 Hindle Stainless Exhaust Low Head Pipes – Kawasaki ZX9R 00-03 The worlds lightest stainless steel exhaust system. Increase horsepower and torque throughout the entire rpm range. Lightweight, strong stainless steel header design looks great and weighs less than stock headers. Available in low- and high-mo

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1982 Kawasaki KZ550C Electric Motorcycle Conversion Notes

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 03-12-2010

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Starting point: • 1982 Kawasaki KZ550C that I found in an alley near my house. Frame rust sanded and repainted. • Rebuilt front suspension ($25 for front fork oil seals, 1 weekend for repair) • Need-to-be-rebuilt front brake caliper • Need-to-be-replaced front master brake cylinder (expected ~$80) • Need-to-be-refurbished electrical wiring system and 12V battery • Working rear brake • Flat rear tire, patched with fix-a-flat (temporary repair), 77″ circumference. • In-tact 530 size 62″ chain with 36 tooth driven sprocket • Miscellaneous spare parts from 1978 Kawasaki KZ450, most of which fit on the 1982 frame, including an ignition switch and key. I started with a chassis I found in an alley near my house. It was in rough shape and needed some refurbishment before I could start the conversion. Most of refurbishment steps are listed above in bullets. In addition to the repainting and repair of important aspects of the bike, I also needed to remove the IC engine components and the grease caked on from years of IC use. The Clymer manual for this bike was helpful in this process, which was about $18 from [13]. Steps for removing the engine were as follows. I removed the seat and the gas tank. I removed the electrical system wiring and 12V battery holder. I then removed the carburetors (which took a lot of pushing and shoving) and air filter box. I then removed the drive socket cover and removed the drive socket from the engine drive shaft. This allowed me to slip the chain off of the drive socket after loosening the rear wheel to put slack into the chain. I slipped the chain off and let it rest on the rear wheel swing arm and drained the old motor oil. I then removed all of the engine mounting bolts and pushed the entire engine out of the right side of the bike. This took a lot of effort but it is possible to remove the engine without removing the piston heads as recommended in the Clymer manual. The engine weights about 60-70 lbs, so it was possible to handle with one person. I suggest using a flat car jack to help with engine removal. I will eventually sell the IC parts through Ebay

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Motorcycle LED lights RENEGADE LIGHTS Installation Guide

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 29-01-2011

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1. Make sure your bike is cool and parked on a flat secure surface! 2. Find your battery (you may have to remove your seat or side covers in order to get to your battery) Disconnect the NEGATIVE ( -) cable. Negative battery cable must be disconnected from the battery in order to avoid safety hazards! Be sure as you disconnect the Negative cable that it does not touch or make contact with your Positive terminal 3. Your new motorcycle LED lights are polarity sensitive–meaning that the RED wires on the LEDs must be hooked to the Positive (+) terminal and the BLACK wires must be hooked to the Ground (-) . All Red Wires must go to a common power wire and ALL Black Wires must go to a common ground. You cannot run the LED motorcycle lights in a series nor can you run the wires from one motorcycle LED light to another in a loop type installation. ( All of the wires on the motorcycle LED lights which you install will end up together in one place at your battery.) 4. Pick a hidden flat surface around the front of your seat area to mount the switch. ( You must be able to reach the switch when the seat and/or side covers are back on your bike.) You will install your switch later using the double-sided tape provided to you. 5. Next, begin choosing the locations where you would like to mount your motorcycle LED lights. Choose areas which will give you the most light coverage overall, but which will allow the motorcycle LED lights itself to be hidden from easy view when you are standing back and looking at the bike. 6. Clean each area where you choose to place a motorcycle LED light with the alcohol based cleaner making sure all dirt and/or oil is removed from that area

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2004 Vengeance MOTORCYCLE OWNERS MANUAL

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Filed Under (Vengeance) by admin on 21-11-2010

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Vengeance Warrior • Vengeance Raider • Vengeance Vertebreaker • Vengeance Striker • Vengeance Vendetta • Vengeance Vindicator Shifting Gears Starting off and changing gears requires coordination of the clutch and throttle and gearshift lever. If you don’t do things right, the amount of control you have over the bike is lessened. To start off, pull in the clutch, shift into first gear, roll on the throttle a little, and ease out the clutch. You will become familiar with the friction zone (that’s where the clutch begins to take hold and move the bike), and you add a bit more throttle. You don’t want to stall the engine, nor do you want to over-rev it. There’s a sweet spot in there; find it. Shift while traveling in a straight line. Shifting in a curve is not good practice, and something to be avoided. Become familiar with the sound of your engine, so you can tell when you should shift without looking at your instruments. When you downshift to a lower gear, you should (in one swift, smooth movement) be able to squeeze the clutch, rev the engine a little to let it catch the lower gear smoothly, and shift down. When you come to a stop in traffic, leave the bike in first gear with the clutch disengaged (just in case you want to accelerate out of there in a hurry). Who knows what may be coming up behind you. Braking Don’t ever forget: The front brake on your motorcycle can supply as much as 70 percent or more of your stopping power. The single most important thing you can learn about braking is to use that front brake every single time you want to slow down. Always apply both the front and the rear brakes at the same time. If necessary, apply them hard, but not so hard that you lock up either wheel. A locked wheel, as well as causing the bike to skid, results in downright inefficient braking. Turning When you are riding along the road, you lean a motorcycle into a turn. Learning to lean is an essential part of riding a motorcycle. It is a normal function of the bike when you are changing its path of travel – and quite different from turning the steering wheel of your car. To get the motorcycle to lean in a normal turn, press the handlebar in the direction of the turn and maintain slight pressure on that handlebar to take you smoothly through that particular turn. In other words: press right to go right; press left to go left. Your instincts to keep the motorcycle on a smooth path while keeping it from falling over usually take care of this without you even noticing it. (Demonstrate to yourself how a motorcycle moves by pressing a handlebar slightly while traveling in a straight line. The motorcycle will move in the direction of the handlebar you pushed.)

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