softail ride height adjustment

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ATK 50MX INSTALLATION AND ADJUSTMENT TIPS

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Filed Under (Atk) by admin on 01-11-2010

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PRELOAD ADJUSTMENT— On some Works shocks a threaded preload is standard. This allows the adjustment of the ride height of the motorcycle. The preload is changed by turning a threaded nut down towards the spring (higher ride height) or up away from the spring (lower ride height). The nut is a right-hand thread. CHECKING RIDE HEIGHT— 1. With the bike unloaded on the side stand and the shock fully extended, have an assistant measure from a point at the axle (center point) to a point on the frame, fender or bodywork directly above it. Record this measurement. 2. With the bike off the stand and the rider in the seat, bounce on the suspension and let the bike settle. Have the assistant measure from the same two points. Subtract the second measurement from the first. HM CRX50 / BAJA & ATK 50MX INSTALLATION AND ADJUSTMENT TIPS Continued on next page. #HM50 – 5/27/99 #HM50 – 5/27/99 To Front Valve Mounting channel Spacer Flange Shock eye Top View of Shock Mount Fig. 1 Top view of upper shock mount. The flange on the shock bushing must face toward the spacer. The valve should point toward the front of the bike Fig. 1 Top view of upper shock mount. The flange on the shock bushing must face toward the spacer. The valve should point toward the front of the bike 3. The amount of settle, or “sag” is a function of the wheel travel. It should only be between 1/4 and 1/3 of the total travel. 4. If the difference is less than the minimum, reduce the spring preload. Measure the distance again starting with Step 2. Adjust again if necessary. 5. If the difference is more than the maximum, increase the spring preload. Measure the distance again starting with Step 2. Adjust again if necessary. Note: If the ride height is too low, the shock will bottom unnecessarily, resulting in a harsh ride. If the ride height is too high, the shock will “top out” too easily when rebounding from a bump or under hard deceleration. NITROGEN PRESSURES IN EMULSION SHOCKS CAUTION: The pressure in these shocks cannot successfully be checked. Concerns with the gauge volume and the gas volume in the shock body create a situation where you cannot accurately determine what pressure was in the shock. In addition when the pressure is lowered (i.e. checking the pressure) the gas and some of the shock oil escapes into the gauge. It is possible to lose a large percentage of the shock oil by depressing the core of a charged shock to the atmosphere. Please note that in order to check the pressure, some of the gas must escape and fill the gauge assembly. The volume of the gas pocket is about half the size of your thumb, so a very small volume change results in a large pressure drop. Because the gauges’ volumes vary, it is not possible to deduce the actual pressure in the shock prior to attaching the gauge. Therefore it is imperative that any attempt to check pressure be accompanied by the capability of refilling the shock. In other words: If you don’t have a nitrogen source handy, don’t check the pressure! PRESSURIZING EMULSION SHOCKS The pressure setting for Works gas shocks is 250 p.s.i. of dry nitrogen. To pressurize a shock with some residual pressure in it, bring the gauge manifold up to 250 p.s.i. and depress the core with the T-handle. This will either equalize the pressure or refill the shock without transferring oil from the shock into the gauge assembly. The best gauges for this purpose screw on to the valve and incorporate a T-handled core depressor to isolate the shock from the gauge. This allows a leak-free separation once the desired pressure is reached. For simplified operation, an extra valve is provided for the filling apparatus, allowing pressure adjustment with the gauge in place. Works offers a suitable gauge and filling manifold. Most motorcycle shops that deal with dirt bikes can pressurize the shock

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HARLEY DAVIDSON SOFTAIL ULTIMA STYLE ADJUSTABLE SHOCKS MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 03-03-2011

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ADJUSTING SPRING PRELOAD (STIFFNESS). NOTE: Shocks typically come set at their loosest (softest) setting. Adjustment range is approximately 4 full rotations. Step 1: Loosen preload adjustment locknut. (see fig. 1) Step 2: Using supplied special tool with a 3/8 ratchet, turn adjusting plate clockwise to stiffen preload & counter-clockwise to loosen preload. (see fig. 2) Step 3: Once preload has been set, lock down preload adjusting nut using blue (med strength) thread locker ADJUSTING RIDE HEIGHT. NOTE: Extending shock assembly lowers frame/fender height. Shortening shock assembly will raise frame/fender height. NOTE: Always check clearances during & after adjusting ride height. Step 1: Loosen ride height adjusting locknut. (see fig. 3) Step 2: Rotate end to desired height. Always leave at least 1 inch of threads engaged in the female threaded shaft. (see fig. 4) Step 3: Lock down ride height adjusting locknut using blue (med strength) threadlocker. (see fig. 5) Step 4: After adjusting ride height on both shocks, verify that they are the same length by measuring from their mounting points. (see fig. 6)

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Harley Davidson Softails Airtail Suspension System Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 30-11-2010

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Step 1: Set the Bottoming Control This is the most important step and needs to be done first. Ideally, with the rear wheel off the ground take a measurement from the axle straight up to a fixed point on the fender (assuming the fender is mounted on the frame and not the swingarm). Then, with the motorcycle back on the ground and the rider on it, pressurize the “Bottoming Control” chamber until you get the same measurement —less 1 ¼ to 1 ½”. For example, if your first measurement was 10.0″ inches then your ending measurement should be between 8.50″ and 8.75″ inches. The difference between the two measurements is referred to as “sag”, and it should equal approximately one third of your total wheel travel (see figure 3). Another method of achieving the proper sag is it start with the bike on the ground — with no rider or load on it. Pressurize the “Bottoming Control” chamber to the highest pressure you can without exceeding 150 psi. At this point the rear wheel should be “topped out” and you need to measure from the axle straight up to a fixed point on the fender as described above. Take the same measurement with rider(s) on the bike — ready to ride. The second measurement should be 1¼” to 1½ ” less than the first. If it isn’t, then bleed off the pressure in the “Bottoming Control” chamber until the proper sag is achieved. If you intend to ride the bike at this “full height” then make sure you still put about 10 psi into the “Ride Height” chamber anyway. This helps the piston that separates the two chambers to move more freely producing a smoother ride. Step 2: Set the Ride Height After you have set the “Bottoming Control” you can now adjust the “Ride Height” chamber. This is a much simpler and less crucial adjustment to make. Simply pressurize the “Ride Height” chamber until the bike is lowered to the desired height. To raise the ride height back up, release pressure in the “Ride Height” chamber. Remember, the pressure in this chamber “holds” the bike down—the more pressure the lower it goes. Though the bike may feel “stiffer” the lower you go, do NOT re-adjust the “Bottoming Control” chamber. Essentially what’s happening here is as you’ve reduced your wheel travel, you’ve proportionally increased the forces that keep you from bottoming out with what wheel travel you have left. If you do need to re-adjust the “Bottoming Control” due the addition (or subtraction) of a passenger or extra load, release the pressure from the “Ride Height” chamber first, then repeat step 1.

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HARLEY DAVIDSON PREMIUM SUSPENSION KIT REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 09-03-2011

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REMOVAL Front Fork Assembly 1. Refer to the XR model section of the service manual and remove the front forks. INSTALLATION Front Fork Assembly 1. Install front forks from kit to motorcycle according to service manual instructions but do not tighten the fork bracket pinch screws at this time. 2. See Figure 1. Measure the distance from the top of upper fork bracket to top of fork assembly. Both sides must be exactly the same and measure 0.388-0.468 inch (9.85- 11.89 mm) above the top fork bracket. Align the adjustment screws inline with the handlebars (see Figure 5). is06083a Figure 1. Fork Installation Height Measurement. NOTE If new pinch screws are not readily available, use a wire grinder wheel to remove all remaining lock patch from original pinch screws, wash screws in clean solvent and dry thoroughly. Apply two drops of LOCTITE® 262 to the first 1/4 in. (6.35 mm) of the end threads. 3. Install pinch screws to upper and lower fork brackets. 4. Verify fork tube installation measurement is 0.388-0.468 inch (9.85-11.89 mm). 5. Tighten pinch screws to 30-35 ft-lbs ( (40.7-47.5 Nm)) See Figure 2. The top edge of reflector should be 1-1/2 inches (38.10 mm) below the lower edge of the bottom fork clamp. 6. Remove the adhesive backing. Place reflector in position and press reflector firmly into place to activate the adhesive. Repeat for reflector on opposite fork. REMOVAL OEM Rear Shock Absorbers 1. Refer to the XR model section of the service manual and remove the rear shock absorbers. INSTALLATION Rear Shock Absorbers 1. See Figure 3. Install the rear shock absorbers according to service manual instructions. The shocks are installed with the external gas reservoir to the rear of the shock absorbers and the thick side of the grommet installed to the frame rail mounts. is06142 Figure 3. Install Thick Side Of Grommet To Frame Rail SUSPENSION ADJUSTMENTS Front Fork Suspension Adjustment Whenever a wheel is installed and before moving the motorcycle, pump brakes to build brake system pressure. Insufficient pressure can adversely affect brake performance, which could result in death or serious injury. (00284a) Adjust both forks equally. Improper fork adjustment can lead to loss of control, which could result in death or serious injury. (00124c) Compression and rebound adjusting valves may be damaged if too much force is used at either end of the adjustment range. (00237a) NOTES Damping is set at the factory for the average solo rider under normal riding conditions. The rider may make adjustments to compensate for individual riding styles and varying road conditions. Evaluating and changing the rebound and compression damping is a very subjective process with many variables and should be approached carefully. The front and rear preload setting will need to be adjusted for the rider’s weight and cargo. This adjustment should be made before the motorcycle is ridden any distance and after changing the overall vehicle weight (adding saddlebags, etc.). If the preload adjustment is correct, and you have the rebound and compression damping set at the factory recommended points, the motorcycle should handle and ride properly. Changes in the load carried requires changes in the preload setting(s). Carrying less weight than was used for setting up the suspension requires decreasing the amount of preload. Increasing the load carried requires adding more preload. The following tools are needed to make suspension adjust- ments. • 5 mm hex key (front fork preload adjustment tool). • Spanner wrench with extension handle (shock absorber preload adjustment). • Screw driver (front fork damping adjustment). 1. Front fork preload adjustment: a. See Figure 4 and Table 1. Using the 5 mm hex key, turn the preload adjuster counterclockwise until it stops. This is the minimum preload setting. b. Turn the preload adjuster clockwise the recommended amount specified for the rider weight

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1984-1999 HARLEY DAVIDSON Softails ULTIMA NARROW BODY ADJUSTABLE SOFTAIL SHOCKS MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 03-03-2011

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Adjusting ride height Step 1. Loosen ride height adjusting locknut (see fig 1) Step 2. Loosen eyelet end to desired length/height (see fig 2) Step 3. IMPORTANT: Always verify that there are threads visible through the sight hole on the eyelet end. If adjusting with shocks installed on bike use a toothpick to verify that threads are blocking the sight hole. If threads are not visible turn eyelet end until they are visible. Failure to follow this step can result in failure. (see fig 3) Step 4. Once desired height is achieved check all clearances. Step 5. Using blue threadlocker lock down adjusting locknut to eyelet end. Step 6. Verify shocks are set at the same length. (See fig 4.)

WORKS PERFORMANCE STREET TRACKER SHOCKS FOR BIG DOG MOTORCYCLES

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 17-12-2010

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SHOCK REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION– The shocks are fitted with special length spacers to maintain correct alignment between the frame and the swingarm. If the shocks are removed for service or repair, they must be installed in the correct position. Refer to the diagram on the next page for spacer positioning and layout. NOTE: Misalignment between the mounts on the frame and the mounts on the swingarm can cause binding between the shock shaft and shaft bushing. Misalignment of more than 1/4 inch can cause the shocks to bind up and not function properly. If this binding occurs, the shocks will feel overly stiff and harsh. Follow the procedures below to check for misalignment when installing the shocks. NOTE: The shock bushings are designed to have a certain side-to-side “float” to keep them from binding. As a result, do not grind or file the inner or outer edges of the bushings to make them narrower. The amount of “float” in the bushing set is necessary to ensure smooth operation of the damper assembly. If the shock eyes are tightened metal-to-metal (the outer faces of the eyes to the flanges or washers), this will lead to a harsh, stiff or choppy ride and premature seal leakage or damage to the shafts. MULTI-RATE SPRINGS Depending on each application, single or dual-rate springs are available. Dual-rate springs are just that– a spring set with two separate rates. This is done with a short spring stacked on a longer spring. As both springs compress they produce a soft, or initial, rate. The spring set will maintain this initial rate until the short spring stops compressing. At that point, the spring rate “crosses over” to the stiffer, or final, rate. This multi-rate system allows a soft initial rate for comfort on small bumps, but has the capability of soaking up the big pot-holes and other road hazards. PRELOAD ADJUSTMENT— On Works shocks, threaded preload is standard. (See Fig. 2.) This allows the adjustment of the ride height of the motorcycle. The preload is changed by turning a threaded nut down towards the spring (higher ride height) or up away from the spring (lower ride height). The nut is a right-hand thread. It is used primarily to set the ride height for solo riding, but can also be used when

HARLEY-DAVIDSON FLH/ FLT AND SOFTAIL (FLST) Owner's Maintenance Notes

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 16-02-2011

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1. Tire Pressure and Rotation : Keep the nominal tire pressure at about 20-25psig. It is not necessary to periodically rotate the trike tires unless you experience unusual tire wear. 2. Bearing Lubrication . Your Swing Arm, external differential and axle bearings are sealed and do not require greasing. However, should you experience unusual differential or axle bearing noise you should take your trike to a Champion Trike Dealer or to your motorcycle mechanic for a checkup. 3. Body Lubrication . There are no grease fittings on the trike body and no required body lubrication points. 4. Differential lubrication . Your differential is a sealed unit and comes filled with high-pressure grease. No maintenance is required. 5. Brakes . Check your brake system fluid level every 3,000 miles and top-off as necessary. Inspect rear disc brake pads every 10,000 miles and replace as necessary. Pads are Volkswagen Part # D101P 6. Drive Train . Inspect your drive belt as recommended in your motorcycle Owner’s Manual. When properly tensioned after the trike conversion, the belt should “deflect” about 1/2 to 5/8 inches when pressed with a force of 10 pounds. Do not use commercial belt dressing compounds on the belt: these compounds are designed for friction, not toothed, belts and can collect dirt and sand. 7. Suspension System. FLH/FLT : The suspension system retains your two OEM shocks and is designed to give you the best ride with a load of no more than 500 pounds (passengers plus cargo plus trailer tongue weight). Keep the air pressure in the shocks in the range of 30-70 psig: Softail (FLST) : The suspension system retains your single OEM shock and adds two coil-over “helper” mechanical shocks. The system is designed to give you the best ride with a load of no more than 500 pounds (passengers plus cargo plus trailer tongue weight). There is a pre-load adjuster ring on each new shock that is factory-set at the “lowest” setting, for the softest ride. Changing this setting will result in a stiffer ride. 8. EZ-Steer (rake kit) : If your trike is equipped with Champion’s EZ-Steer, the bearings are a wear item. You should follow your motorcycle manufacturer’s recommended front-end triple-tree maintenance requirements. Generally these call for an initial service at 1,000 miles followed by periodic maintenance at 10,000 mile intervals.

HONDA 450E/ S MOUNTING AND ARS ADJUSTMENT INSTALLATION

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 24-12-2011

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MULTI-RATE SPRINGS AND THE ARS SYSTEM Depending on the application dual–rate springs are fitted on the shocks. Dual-rate springs are just that– a spring set with two separate rates. This is done with a short spring stacked on a longer spring. As both springs collapse they produce a soft, or initial, rate. The spring set will maintain this initial rate until the short spring stops compressing. At that point, the spring rate “crosses over” to the stiffer, or final, rate. This multi-rate system allows a soft initial rate for comfort on small bumps, but has the capability of soaking up the big pot-holes and other off road hazards. ARS stands for Adjustable Rate Suspension. ARS is available on some dual-rate spring 4-wheel ATV shocks. ARS differs from spring preload. The ARS system allows the rider to increase or decrease the load-carrying capacity of the shocks by turning a lever. Depending on the application and spring set, the rider can increase the load capacity of the shocks up to 50 percent. The average preloader that makes a half-inch increase in preload will HONDA 450E/S MOUNTING & ARS ADJUSTMENT INSTRUCTIONS Continued on next page. #TRX450 – 5/28/99 #TRX450 – 5/28/99 Fig. 1. Front shock installation. Note that the shock body is at the top with the shaft pointing down. ARS shown is in the unloaded position. Fig. 2. Rear shock mounting with ARS. Position the lever so that it will not come in contact with any vehicle parts around it. The cup can be rotated to reposition the lever if necessary.
increase the capacity of the shocks to only about 5 to 10 percent. ARS allows the shocks to be correct for solo riding, but still handle the increased weight of an added load. ARS can also be employed to stiffen the rates for aggressive riding. The ARS system consists of an indexing lever and a stepped cup that contains the short spring of the dual- rate. The position of the lever in relation to the steps in the cup determines how long the spring set remains on the soft, or initial, spring rate. On most ARS applications, four positions can be selected from full stiff to full soft. Indexing is done in a matter of seconds by rotating the lever or the cup by hand. Indexing the cup to the lever is usually preferable to avoid interference. Adjustment of the ARS system should only be made while the vehicle is unloaded to reduce the load on the springs. NOTE: It is important to make sure that a step in the cup is positioned directly over the tang on the lever. This will prevent damage to the cup and/or lever that can be caused by making partial contact between the tang and a step. In addition, make sure that the lever will not contact any vehicle parts around it, as the suspension moves up. TUNING TIPS—The “softest” setting on the ARS does not mean that the ride will be the most comfortable at that setting. It means that this is the softest spring setting which would be employed on smooth trails or without a load. Excessive suspension bottoming caused by rough conditions or by the addition of a large load will cause a harsh ride when the shock is adjusted to this setting. To eliminate this bottoming, adjust the ARS to the stiffer positions for a more comfortable ride. Hence, sometimes “stiffer is softer.” NITROGEN PRESSURES IN EMULSION SHOCKS

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HARLEY DAVIDSON SOFTAIL DETACHABLE SADDLEBAG KITS INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 22-03-2011

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Detachable Saddlebag Configurations Table 1 provides a short description of the detachable saddlebag configurations. Table 1. Softail Detachable Saddlebag Configurations Accessory Configuration (Long Description) Short Descrip- tion Kit 2003-Later FLST/C and 2003-2005 FX Softail Models (Except FXSTD) With Other Detachable Accessories FL Outer 88237-07 2003-Later FLST/C and 2003-2005 FX Softail Models (Except FXSTD) Without Other Detachable Accessories FL Inner 2003-Later FLST/C and 2003-2005 FX Softail Models (Except FXSTD) With Rigid-Mounted Accessories FL Rigid 2006-Later FX Models (Except FXSTD) With Other Detachable Accessories FX Outer 88238-07 2006-Later FX Models (Except FXSTD) Without Other Detachable Accessories FX Inner 2006-Later FX Models (Except FXSTD) With Rigid-Mounted Accessories FX Rigid 2007-Later FXSTC Models With Stock Passenger Upright FXSTC Stock NOTE Proper installation of these kits requires that tasks be completed for one side of the motorcycle first before continuing to the opposite side. Install Turn Signal Relocation Kit Refer to instructions included with Turn Signal Relocation Kit 69857-07. Install Docking Hardware Kit(s) Without Other Detachable Accessories: Refer to instructions included with Docking Hardware Kit 53932-03. With Other Detachable Accessories: Refer to instructions included with Docking Hardware Kits 53932-03 and 88256-07. Install Rear Docking Adapter NOTE This procedure only applies to models without detachable accessories. 1. See Figure 1. Insert rear docking adapter (1) into holes in saddlebag bracket and hold in place. 2. Install rear docking adapter using screw (2) and nut (3). Tighten snugly.

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HARLEY-DAVIDSON SOFTAIL MODELS STEALTH AIR SHOCK MOUNTING

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 16-12-2010

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INSTALLATION 1. Remove the seat, inner fender, and ignition coil cover. Removing the rear wheel assembly is recommended for ease of installation, but not absolutely necessary. Remove the nut cup and outer grommet on each of the Works shocks. If you intend to leave the ride height at stock height for road riding, position the inner nut cup SHOC KS SHOC KS WORKS PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS, INC. 21045 Osborne St., Canoga Park, CA 91304 818.701.1010 fax 818.701.9043 STEALTH AIR SHOCK MOUNTING FOR HARLEY-DAVIDSON SOFTAIL MODELS 2000-ON #HDAIR-00 – 02/15/2006 WARNING! THESE SHOCKS MUST ONLY BE USED WITH STOCK SWINGARMS AND ON STOCK FRAMES WITH THE STOCK BOTTOMING BUMPERS ON THE CHASSIS TO LIMIT THE TRAVEL OF THE SHOCKS. AFTERMARKET SWINGARMS, OR MODIFIED SWINGARMS THAT DO NOT HAVE THE UPPER BRACE THAT ACTS AGAINST THE BOTTOMING BUMPERS CANNOT BE USED WITH THESE SHOCKS. INCREASING THE TRAVEL BY ELIMINATING THE BUMP STOPS OR A NON-STANDARD SWINGARM DESIGN WILL ALLOW THE TIRE TO MAKE CONTACT WITH THE FENDER OR OTHER CHASSIS COMPONENTS, AND CAN DAMAGE THE SHOCKS. 19. Lock Washers 20. Long Bolts (2) 21. Short Bolts (2) 13. Din Plug Screw 14. Din Plug Gasket 15. Cap 16. Eye Spacers (4) 17. Cotter Pins (2) 18. Switch Bracket 7. Compressor Bracket 8. Harness 9. Fuse Block 10. Din Connector 11. Solenoid 12. Hose 1. Damper Shock 2. Air Spring Shock 3. Nut Cup 4. Grommet 5. Hose 6. Compressor 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 14 18 19 20 21 Fig. 1–Nomenclature on the damper shock up against the ring nut. The shocks are now ready to install. 2. Place the motorcycle on a suitable frame stand allowing unrestricted access to the shocks. 3. Place a small screw jack under the swing arm to support the weight as well as allow you to position the swing arm correctly to line up the shock mounting bolts. Remove stock shocks. 4. Install the left side (damping) shock with the stock mounting bolt. Make sure that the bolt threads and threaded portions of the frame are free of oil and grease. Grease the shoulders of the bolts and use thread lock compounds on the threads. Discard the stock shock washers on both shocks. Do not use any washers- -including the stock washers on these bolts. Use only the spacers included. The 3/16-inch wide spacers are used on each side of the shock eye. Do not “double-up” the spacers together on either side of the shock eye, as this will cause misalignment of the shocks which can lead to premature wear or damage to the shocks. 5. Put the supplied spacers on each side of the eye. The shoulder of the bolt must protrude a small amount through the shock eyes in order to allow the shock to pivot freely. This is extremely important. With the shocks fully tightened, the spacers should be free to rotate with finger pressure. If the washer is used or a non-stock bolt is used, the bolts will work loose or break because the shocks are in a bind.

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