Brakes, Wheel Assemblies, and Tires tips

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 09-02-2012

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BRAKING SYSTEMS The braking systems used on motorcycles and ATVs, like virtually any type of braking system, reduce the machine’skineticenergyby transforming it into heat energy known as friction heat . Therefore, a brake is an energy-conversion device that converts the energy of motion (kinetic energy) into heat energy. Motorcycle braking is accomplished by the friction (resistance to movement) produced when a brake lining is forced against a rotating drum or disc. Friction between the linings and drum or disc serve to slow and eventually stop wheel rotation. The brakes used on motorcycles fall into two categories: Mechanical drum, sometimes called expanding shoe Hydraulic disc Motorcycle brakes commonly use either hydraulic (fluid pressure) or mechanical (cable or linkage) mechanisms to apply the brakes. Brakes, Wheel Assemblies, and Tires 1 Mechanical Drum Brakes First, let’slookatthedrum brake, sometimes called the mechanical, expanding double-shoe brake ( Figure 1 ). Generally used for rear wheels, this brake is also used on some front wheels. With this kind of brake, a backing plate that’sconnectedtothe forks holds the two brake shoes. The wheel and brake drum rotate around the brake shoes. When the rider applies the brake, a cam pushes the two semicircular shoes outward. The circle formed by the two shoes expands. When the shoes expand, they press against the rotating drum, thereby limiting its free rotation

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APRILIA RSV 1000 R – RSV 1000 R FACTORY Workshop manual

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Filed Under (Aprilia) by admin on 29-11-2010

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LUBRICANTS DANGER A good lubrication ensures the vehicle safety. Failure to keep the lubricants at the recommended level or the use of a non-suitable new and clean type of lubricant can lead to the engine or gearbox seizure, thus leading to serious accidents, personal injury or even death. Gear oil may cause serious damage to the skin if handled daily and for long periods. Wash your hands carefully after use. Do not dispose of oil into the environment. Take it to the filling station where you usually buy it or to an oil salvage center. WARNING When filling the vehicle with this oil, take care not to spill it out since it could damage the vehicle paint- work. In case of contact with oil, the tyres surface will become very slippery, thus becoming a serious danger for your safety. In case of leaks, do not use the vehicle. Check and trace the cause of leaks and proceed to repair. ENGINE OIL DANGER Prolonged or repeated contact with engine oil may cause severe skin damage. Wash your hands thoroughly after handling engine oil. Do not release into the environment. Dispose of engine oil through the nearest waste oil reclamation firm or through the supplier. Wear latex gloves during servicing FRONT FORK FLUID DANGER Front suspension response can be modified to a certain extent by changing damping settings and/or selecting a particular grade of oil. Standard oil grade is SAE 20 W. Different oil grades can be selected to obtain a particular suspension response. (Choose SAE 5W for a softer suspension, 20W for a stiffer sus- pension). The two grades can also be mixed in varying solutions to obtain the desired response. GENERAL INFORMATION 1 -9 RSV 1000 R – RSV 1000 R FACTORY BRAKE FLUID NOTE This vehicle is fitted with front and rear disc brakes. Each braking system is operated by an independent hydraulic circuit. The information provided below applies to both braking systems. DANGER Do not use the vehicle in case brakes are worn out or do not work properly! The brakes are the parts that most ensure your safety and for this reason they must always be perfectly working. Failure to comply with these recommendations will probably lead to a crash or an accident, with a consequent risk of personal injury or death. A wet surface reduces brakes efficiency.

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Demonstrate knowledge of motorcycle braking systems and repair procedures

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 21-11-2010

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Demonstrate knowledge of motorcycle braking system repair procedures. Performance criteria 2.1 Fault diagnosis procedures are described in accordance with service information. Range safety procedures when diagnosing, logical inspection procedure, checking fault codes, recognising wear, damage, scoring, poor adjustment, seized parts, corrosion, air in hydraulics, brake squeal, brake shudder, brake grab. 2.2 Hydraulic cylinder inspection procedures are described in accordance with service information. Range layout of components, cylinder operation, cleaning methods, measuring wear, attention to cleanliness, limits of corrosion and scoring. 2.3 Brake repair procedures are described in accordance with service information. Range repairing cylinders and callipers, safety implications, replacing cables and rods, fitting shoes and pads, adjusting brakes, replacing brake fluid, clearing fault codes, testing brake operation. Please note Providers must be accredited by NZQA, or an inter-institutional body with delegated authority for quality assurance, before they can report credits from assessment against unit standards or deliver courses of study leading to that assessment. Industry Training Organisations must be accredited by NZQA before they can register credits from assessment against unit standards. Accredited providers and Industry Training Organisations assessing against unit standards must engage with the moderation system that applies to those standards. Accreditation requirements and an outline of the moderation system that applies to this standard are outlined in the Accreditation and Moderation Action Plan (AMAP). The AMAP also includes useful information about special requirements for organisations wishing to develop education and training programmes, such as minimum qualifications for tutors and assessors, and special resource requirements

MECHANIC CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS MDOS Form: Repair Facility Manual

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 18-11-2010

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Chapter 7: Mechanic Certification Requirements Page 4 7-2.2 Heavy-duty Truck Certification Categories. The Heavy-duty Truck Repair categories requiring mechanic certification to repair vehicles over 10,000 pounds G.V.W. are: a) Engine Repair, Gasoline; b) Engine Repair, Diesel; c) Drive Trains; d) Brakes and Braking Systems; e) Suspension and Steering Systems; f) Electrical Systems; g) Collision-Related Mechanical Repair. 7-2.3 Other On-road Vehicle Certification Categories. Repair categories for other on-road vehicles that require mechanic certification to perform repairs are: a) Motorcycle; b) Recreational Trailer. Automobile and Light Truck Certification Categories. The repair categories requiring mechanic certification to repair vehicles under 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight (G.V.W.) are: a) Engine Repair; b) Engine Tune-up/Performance; c) Front End, Suspension and Steering Systems; d) Brakes and Braking Systems; e) Automatic Transmission; f) Manual Transmission, Front and Rear Drive Axles; g) Electrical Systems; h) Heating and Air Conditioning; i) Collision-Related Mechanical Repair; j) Unitized Body Structural Repair; k) Pre-1973 Vehicle Repair

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