REKLUSE MOTOR SPORTS Pro Start Clutch Harley-Davidson OWNER'S MANUAL

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 24-11-2010

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REAK-IN PERIOD The ProStart clutch requires a short break-in period. During the break-in period, the ProStart should not be operated at steady engine speeds above 3000 RPMs for more than 10 minutes. Breaking-in the ProStart clutch equires start and stop cycles. Riding the ProStart clutch in stop-and-go city traffic for one hour will provide sufficient break-in. If you would like to accelerate the break-in period, find an empty parking lot with ample room and no other traffic. From a stop, bring the motorcycle to 20 miles per hour and then back to a stop. Repeat this process at least 20 times. MAINTENANCE Proper maintenance is important to ensure the longevity of the Rekluse ProStart clutch and the rest of the stock clutch components in your Harley- Davidson Motorcycle. Refer to your owner’s manual for proper primary chaincase oil levels and oil type. Rekluse recommends the use of Harley- Davidson Primary Chaincase lubricant with the Rekluse ProStart clutch. Do not use oils designed for use as automotive engine oil in your Primary Chaincase. If Harley-Davidson Primary Chaincase lubricant is not readily available, a premium-quality Diesel engine oil, such as Shell Rotella T, that does not contain friction modifiers may be substituted. Inspection and adjustment of the Rekluse ProStart clutch should only be performed by a service center trained in Harley-Davidson and Rekluse ProStart repair and maintenance. The Rekluse ProStart clutch should be inspected for adjustment after 1,000 miles of operation. Thereafter, inspection for adjustment should be performed at 5,000 mile intervals

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How to Replacing Rear Main Seal 1

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 24-11-2010

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The next day I woke up early and drank lots of coffee before going out to the garage. I knew I had two distinct problems confronting me. First, I would have to purchase an impact tool in order to loosen the six bolts holding the clutch together. Also, I would have to purchase at least three 8mm by 50mm bolts and nuts in order to prevent the clutch from exploding when the six bolts were unscrewed. For the third time in two days, I went to Sears and asked the salesman, (who I now I knew as Art,) where I could find an impact tool. He did not know what it was I was looking for, but he asked another employee and soon I had the tool as well as a 6mm Allen socket. Unfortunately, the Allen socket only came in 3/8″ drive, and the impact tool only came in 1/2″ drive. Thinking quickly, I purchased a 1/2″ to 3/8″ adapter, as well as a 3lb. dead- blow hammer. On the way home, I stopped at a Chief Auto Parts to buy the bolts I would need. The closest size they had were 8mm by 40mm, which was nearly 10mm too short. I was unsure whether the clutch cover bolts were coarse thread or fine thread, so I bought three of each, along with corresponding nuts. Finally, around 11 o’clock in the morning, I was back at the garage ready to work. I prepared the impact tool and placed the adapter and the Allen socket on it. I began to hammer on the end of the tool, trying to loosen each of the six bolts. None of them seemed to move, even though it seemed the impact tool was turning. Finally, I put the Allen socket on the breaker bar and found that all of the bolts had actually come loose. The tension from the clutch spring made it nearly impossible to see, however. I removed three of the bolts in a triangular pattern. Into these empty holes I threaded the fine- thread 40mm bolts with nuts attached and tightened them evenly. I was now able to remove the remaining Allen bolts. By slowly turning and loosening the nuts evenly on the 40mm bolts, I relieved the pressure from the clutch spring until the cover plate was free. I removed the cover plate, the clutch, the pressure plate, and finally the clutch spring. I had already marked each of the elements with Whiteout to insure that they would fit together the same way on installation. Apparently, this is essential as the flywheel could be rendered out-of-balance if the clutch components are not installed correctly. The flywheel itself was now exposed. I could see the five bolts that attached it to the crankshaft. I now used a tool I had fabricated. Although the manual describes two possible tools that can be fabricated, I found a piece of metal that resembled the tool and decided to use it. Unfortunately it was not strong enough and broke. I turned and looked at my workbench, and noticed a bracket which I had previously fabricated for mounting a mirror on my Vespa. The piece of steel was extremely strong and was already pre-drilled with correct-sized holes. It fit perfectly, so I placed it over the exposed bolt which protruded from the case, and placed the other end on one of the 40mm bolts, which I then bolted into the flywheel itself. I used the breaker bar again and removed the five bolts. The flywheel came loose after inserting two more 40mm bolts and tugging on them evenly

Harley Davidson WIDE TIRE KIT , FOR TWIN CAM BAKER 300 INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 10-11-2010

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1. DISCONNECT AND REMOVE THE BATTERY 2. DRAIN FLUIDS: The transmission and primary drive oils need to be completely drained. Refer to the H-D® Factory Service Manual. 3. ELEVATE THE REAR WHEEL off the ground by positioning the bike on a suitable jack or bike lift. The motorcycle will remain in this position until the transformation from Page 9 to Page 20 is complete. So make sure it is safe, stable and there is 5-feet- or-so of peripheral room to move about. 4. DISASSEMBLE: Remove the transmission, seat, primary drive housing, clutch components, rear tire, swing arm, swing arm jounce bumper, exhaust pipes, and fender. Refer to the factory service manual. Also, remove the rear brake caliper and brake line all the way up to the rear master cylinder. The primary drive components will be reinstalled as a part of the BAKER 300™ transformation. All the other components can be set aside and sold on Ebay® or your local swap meet. FIGURE 1 NOTE: Starter and transmission can be removed without removing oil tank via the left side of the motorcycle. 5. CUTTING FENDER SUPPORTS: The fender struts must be removed in order for the new BAKER 300TM fender to fit. Bolt into place the fender support cutting templates (marked L for left and R for right and provided in the kit) to the sides of the frame by using the bolts from the support covers. L and R must face out for correct template orientation FIGURE 2 . Use a reciprocating saw (aka sawzall) or abrasive cutoff wheel to remove the supports as shown in FIGURE 2 . With a large flat file, break (smooth off) all sharp corners and edges. The resultant bare metal will not be visible once the BAKER 300™ fender is installed. CHECK NEWLY CUT FRAME FOR FENDER FITMENT AT THIS POINT BEFORE PROCEEDING. Additional material may need to be removed for proper fitment. 6. As an anti-corrosion measure, paint the exposed bare metal with primer and/or paint.

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