Harley-Davidson Road King Handlebar Removal and Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 18-03-2012

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If the wire length appears to be too short, you will have to lengthen the wires. If that’s the case, I must stress that soldering your wires is far superior to using butt splices. Wiring can be pulled from the splices and the splices themselves will take up a lot of room, making your harness bulky. To extend your wires, ensure the wire segments you are going to splice into the harness are of the same gauge as the original harness. Also, it’s a good idea to cut all of the wire segments now, ahead of time, to the same measured length. This will ensure that once all of the new wire Figure 4. Handlebar harness plug wires as they appear from the back of the plug (where the wires enter the plug from the harness) segments are spliced in, all of the finished wires are of the same length and the pins are lined up. Work from wire to wire, cutting them by staggering the cuts about an inch or so apart (see figure 5). This will prevent a bulge in your harness where all the soldering connections are. After cutting each wire, slide on a two-inch piece of heat shrink tubing before starting your soldering. Remove about ¾” of insulation from the ends of the two wire ends (one wire end being the harness, the other being the segment of new wire being spliced in). Halfway down the length of its exposed section, bend each wire 90 degrees and hook the two wire segments together at the bends. Holding the wires securely with a pair of pliers, twist them in opposite directions around each other. Make sure the ends of the wires are wrapped as tight as possible so their sharp points will not cut through the heat shrink tubing when it’s applied. Apply some soldering flux (a little is all you need) and solder the connection by first applying your soldering iron (or gun) to the wire and then applying the solder to the wire. You should not apply the solder directly to the iron as overheating the solder can lead to poorly made solder joints and improper conduction of electricity. When the connection has cooled, slide your heat shrink tubing over the joint and heat it so that the tubing shrinks, making a nice tight seal.

APRILIA ATLANTIC 125 – 200 REPAIR/ SERVICE MANUAL

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Filed Under (Aprilia) by admin on 19-11-2010

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DISASSEMBLING THE COMPONENTS – Never use pliers or similar tools to slacken and/or tighten nuts and bolts. Always use a suitable spanner. – Mark all connections (hoses, wiring, etc.) with their positions before disconnecting them. Identify each connection using a distinctive symbol or convention. – Mark each part clearly to avoid confusion when refitting. – Thoroughly clean and wash any components you have removed using a detergent with low flash point. – Mated parts should always be refitted together. These parts will have seated themselves against one another in service as a result of normal wear and tear and should never be mixed up with other similar parts on refitting. – Certain components are matched-pair parts and should always be replaced as a set. – Keep the motorcycle and its components well away from heat sources. ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS To disconnect the electrical connector, follow the procedures below. Failure to comply with these procedures may lead to irreparable damages to the connector and the wiring as well. If present, press the special safety hooks. ENGINE OIL DANGER Prolonged or repeated contact with engine oil may cause severe skin damage. Wash your hands thoroughly after handling engine oil. Do not release into the environment. Dispose of engine oil through the nearest waste oil reclamation firm or through the supplier. Wear latex gloves during servicing. Change engine after the first 1000 km (621 mi) and then every 6000 km (3728 mi), 2.11.2. (Recommended) oil fork , see 1.8.1. FRONT FORK OIL DANGER Modifying the suspension settings or the viscosity of the front fork oil will affect its response. Standard oil viscosity: SAE 20 W. Choose the oil viscosity to determine the type of response required (SAE 5W for a softer suspension, 20W for a stiffer suspension). The two grades can also be mixed in varying solutions to obtain the desired response. F.A. or Fork have special properties, which enable them to retain virtually the same viscosity regardless of temperature to give constant damping response