Harley Davidson Fork Lowering Kit Installation And removal Instruction

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 24-02-2012

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1. Remove and disassemble forks (including removal of damper rod) according to steps outlined in an authorized service manual for your particular model and year Harley Davidson (see figure 1 for reference). 2. To achieve a one inch (1″) lowered height, leave the stock top out spring on the damper rod and install one Progressive Suspension top out spring on the damper rod with the stock top out spring (see figure 2). Proceed to step 4. 3. To achieve a two inch (2″) lowered height, leave the stock top out spring on the damper rod and install two Progressive Suspension top out springs on the damper rod with the stock top out spring (see figure 3). 4. Reinstall damper rods into forks per shop manual. A. Add the proper amount of fork oil as recommended in your shop manual. Make sure the viscosity is the recommended weight. B. Install your Progressive Suspension fork springs with the close wound end up

Street Fork Spring Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 13-02-2011

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1. Remove fork springs according to instructions contained in your shop manual. For maximum performance we highly recommend that the forks be thoroughly cleaned, inspected and new fork oil installed. Note: If your motorcycle comes equipped with two fork springs in each leg (long & short), remove and discard both springs and the flat washer between the springs. If a stock spacer exits, remove it. If there is a short spring on the damper rod, do not remove it! 2. Use the recommended fork oil viscosity as noted in your owners manual with the following exceptions: GL1100 20 weight, GL1200/1500 15 weight required. See fine tuning for more in- formation. Fork oil level/volume should be checked according to the steps outlined in your authorized shop manual. Measurement of your fork oil by level is the preferred method. However, some manuals only specify a volume measurement. Due to the design of a progressive wound fork spring it will displace more oil thus requiring a maximum oil level of 5.5″ (140mm). Caution: This is not a recommendation, it is only a precautionary statement. If your manual specifies an oil level higher than 5.5″ (140mm) set the oil level at 5.5″ (140mm). (Oil level is the distance from the top of the fork tube to the top of the oil with the fork completely collapsed and the fork spring removed see figure 1.) This measurement can be made by using either one of the Progressive Suspension Fork Oil Level Adjusters (FOL-1 or FOL-2). 3. Install your new fork springs into the forks. Mechanically, it makes no difference which way the springs are installed. Some manuals will state; install the spring with the close wound end towards the bottom. This is done because sometimes there will be less spring noise. The springs will perform exactly the same regardless of which direction they are placed. Check the spacer length requirement for your motorcycle in the enclosed supplement. If not listed, you must calculate the pre-load. What is pre-load? Pre-load is the distance the spring compresses when the fork cap is installed. You may or may not utilize a spacer to achieve proper pre-load. The spacer in itself is not “pre-load”. It just helps to achieve it. Why is pre-load important? It determines the proper ride height which in turn affects how the bike handles.

Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Upgrading the Suspension on the Kawasaki ER6-F/ N

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 30-11-2010

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Top fork is as removed. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Before removing the fork from the clamps on the yokes I loosened the fork top. Before removing the fork top the fork-slider was placed in a vice and the bottom bolt loosened….. … before finally being removed with the fork upside down. Because the springs were still in situ this gave sufficient tension on the damper-rod to prevent it from turning and allow the bolt to be removed. When I turned the fork the right-way up to remove the fork-top I did it over a container to catch the oil. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource All the OE components that will no longer be required. Left to right. Fork-top, spacer tube, washer, spring, damper-rod. Bottom bolts get re-used. Old and new, laid-out for comparison. The damper unit, minus spring and fork-top, drops inside the stanchion and slider. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Then the bolt goes back in, as tight as possible, to secure it. Top fork is done, second one awaits. Note the spring seat on the right, just below the spring. This drops over the damping rod after the oil has been added. The small locking-nut screws over the threaded part of the damping-rod next, all the way to the bottom. Spring drops in and then the fork-top screws on to the damping-rod as well, all the way down to the lock-nut which is used to secure it. At this point the stanchion is extended to the fork-top which is screwed in. Job done.

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