Honda Shadow Backrest Kit Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 07-12-2011

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Install the right and left brackets, leave screws loose to allow brackets some movement for ease of backrest installation. Install the ackrest as shown, if optional carrier is also purchased, use the longer flange bolts provided. Note the backrest goes inside of the brackets, and carrier rack (optional) will go outside of the brackets when installed. Tighten all nuts and bolts to the torques specified

Honda Shadow VT750C Fuel Valve Diaphragm Replacement

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 25-11-2010

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1. Drain the fuel into an approved container. 2. Remove the fuel tank using the procedure in the Service Manual. However, do not remove the fuel valve from the fuel tank. 3. Remove the four screws, and diaphragm cover. NOTE: The diaphragm cover is under spring pressure. The countermeasure part has a paint mark near the air vent hole. 4. Replace the diaphragm, spring, cover, and screws with new parts included in the kit. Install the new diaphragm with the plastic retainer facing the diaphragm cover. NOTE: Make sure the air vent hole is facing downward towards the ground. 5. Reinstall the fuel tank using the procedures in the Service Manual. 6. Refill the fuel tank

Honda Shadow A.C.E. v. Yamaha V-Star 1100 Middleweight Import Cruiser Shootout

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 25-11-2010

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You want a big cruiser but you don’t need a large 1500 cc behemoth that weighs close to half-a-ton fully loaded. You want something you can cruise down the boulevard on but you want to be able to handle a corner or two. You want classic styling but you insist on reliability as well. If these are your guidelines, then Honda and Yamaha might have what you’re looking for in the guise of the Honda Shadow American Classic Edition and Yamaha V-Star 1100. Shadow ACE 1100 The ACE and V-Star have a few things in common: Both sport requisite V-twin powerplants (75° for the V-Star and 45° for the ACE) and both possess typical Japanese refinement. Aside from these similarities, the two rides are very different machines. While both machines are shaft driven, the ACE uses the shaft housing as the swingarm. Although this arrangement is effective, it’s a bit lacking style-wise. However, the whitewall tires and the classic fenders and tank help to create a traditional design that turns heads when you’re out and about. The V-Star uses a different approach, utilizing a pivoting sub-frame design with a hidden mono-shock that keeps the lines fluid and consistent with the rest of the bike. Although this beast isn’t equipped with whitewall tires, it still cuts a graceful, glittering profile. The only flaw we noticed was the small headlight that

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