Honda CG125 Owners Manual, and repair manual

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 11-12-2011

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The author of this manual has the conviction that the only way in which a meaningful and easy to follow text can be
written is first to do the work himself, under conditions similar to those found in the average household. As a result, the hands seen in the photographs are those of the author. Even the machines are not new: examples that have covered a consider- able mileage were selected so that the conditions encountered would be typical of those found by the average owner. Unless specially mentioned, and therefore considered essential, Honda service tools have not been used. There is
invariably some alternative means of slackening or removing some vital component when service tools are not available and
isk of damage has to be avoided at all costs. Each of the six Chapters is divided into numbered Sections. Within the Sections are numbered paragraphs. In consequence, cross reference throughout this manual is both straightforward
and logical. When a reference is made ‘See Section 5.12′ it means Section 5, paragraph 12 in the same Chapter. If another
Chapter were meant, the text would read ‘See Chapter 2, Section 5.12′. All photographs are captioned with a Section/paragraph number to which they refer and are always relevant to the Chapter text adjacent. Figure numbers (usually line illustrations) appear in numerical order, within a given Chapter. Fig. 1.1 therefore refers o the first figure in Chapter 1. Left-hand and right-hand descriptions of the machines and their component parts refer to the right and left of a given machine when the rider is seated normally. Motorcycle manufacturers continually make changes to specifications and recommendations, and these, when notified,mare incorporated into our manuals at the earliest opportunity.
We take great pride in the accuracy of information given in this manual, but motorcycle manufacturers make alterations and design changes during the production run of a particular n motorcycle of which they do not inform us. No liability can be ccepted by the authors or publishers for loss, damage or injury caused by any errors in, or omissions from, the information give

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Harley-Davidson Electra Glide LED Motorcycle Lightbar Installation Guide

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Filed Under (Harley Davidson) by admin on 29-01-2011

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Mounting IMPORTANT! The lightbar should be located a minimum of 16″ from any radio antennas! This product is designed to mount in the lowest, visable section of the motorcycle windshield. The mounting procedure requires removal of the front facia panel of the motorcycle. 1. Remove the 3 screws along the base of the windshield from the upper section of the faring facia panel. 2. Remove the 4 remaining screws (shown above) that secure the facia panel to the faring. With these screws removed, the facia and windshield can now be removed from the motorcycle faring. 3. Position the lightbar into its mounting position. The base of the lightbar fits onto the three screw bosses used by the screws removed in step 1. 4. With the facia panel removed, the lightbar should now be wired. 5. Route the wires to their respective destinations. It is left to the installation technician’s discretion to select a path for these wires that will both protect them from possible damage and not interfere with the operation of any other vehicle components or equipment. 6. Using the original hardware removed in steps 1 & 2, remount the faring and windshield according to the motorcycle manufacturers service manual

Carbureted vs. Fuel Injected Systems

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 25-10-2010

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fuel injection (FI) systems have been around since the 1950′s and became widely used in cars during the 80′s. By the 1990′s all cars sold in the United States were equipped with FI systems, and though motorcycle manufacturers have included FI systems with some models as early as 1982, it isn’t until recently that the industry has seen wide spread use of FI. Since a lot of people come into my shop with questions about FI, I thought I would point out some of the differences between FI and carbureted systems as well as the benefits and disadvantages of both. A carbureted system is a mechanical system using air pressure to control the flow of fuel through the system. There are three basic parts in a carburetor, the throttle valve, the venturi and the float bowl. The throttle valve controls the amount of air that flows into the throat of the carburetor also known as the venturi which is simply a tapered hole through the carburetor body. As the venturi narrows, air moving through it is forced to speed up creating low pressure inside the carburetor. In a siphoning effect as the air tries to equalize the pressure, fuel is drawn in from the float bowl mixing with the air before entering the engine. The wider open the throttle valve, the more air will flow, drawing more fuel. A number of circuits are built into the carburetor in order to control the amount of air/fuel being drawn into the engine. In this context a circuit refers to a fuel passageway as opposed to an electrical circuit. In fact, nothing electrical controls fuel delivery in a carbureted system, it is all based on fluid flow, vacuum and hydraulics. The different circuits represent various throttle positions such as idle, partially open and fully open, and each of these circuits can be tuned to modify the efficiency of fuel delivery to the system. Fuel injection (FI) systems, on the other hand, rely on an electronic fuel pump to deliver fuel. The fuel pump delivers fuel at around 50psi as opposed to carbureted systems at normal atmospheric pressure of about 15psi. When the fuel reaches the injectors, the higher pressure allows much finer atomization (creating mist) of the fuel. The injectors then spray the atomized fuel into the intake manifold in a uniform conical pattern. The uniform pattern and fine atomization of the fuel spray increase the efficiency in which it is burned

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