KTM SX50/ SX50R MOUNTING INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (KTM) by admin on 02-02-2012

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top out” too easily and fail to allow enough travel for appropriate rebound from bumps. If the ride height is too low, the shock can bottom too easily, resulting in a harsh ride. The spring rates are set up for the full amount of travel. If the preload is too little, the combined rate is not enough to resist bottoming. Generally speaking, the vehicle should settle 1/4 to 1/3 of its wheel travel with the rider on board for off road use. The proper way to measure the ride height: 1. Support the vehicle on a frame stand or center stand with the rear wheel clear of the ground. 2. Have an assistant measure and record the vertical distance between the rear axle and a point directly above it (seat, fender, frame, muffler, etc.). 3. Take the motorcycle off the stand and sit on it in a normal riding posture, with one foot on the peg and the motorcycle balanced so as to have minimal weight on your other foot. 4. Have the assistant carefully measure from the same two points. Subtract the second measurement from the first. The difference is the amount of settling or “sag.” NITROGEN PRESSURES CAUTION: The pressure in these shocks cannot successfully be checked. Concerns with the gauge volume and the gas volume in the shock body create a situation where you cannot accurately determine what pressure was in the shock. In addition, the gas is in a column on top of the oil, and when the pressure is lowered (i.e. checking the pressure) the gas will emulsify into the oil. This will cause the gas and some of the shock oil to escape into the gauge. It is possible to lose a large percentage of the shock oil by depressing the core of a charged shock to the atmosphere. Please note that in order to check the pressure, some of the gas must escape and fill the gauge assembly. The volume of the gas pocket is about the size of your thumb, so a very small volume change results in a large pressure drop. Because the gauges’ volumes vary, it is not possible to deduce the actual pressure in the shock prior to attaching the gauge. Therefore it is imperative that any attempt to check pressure be accompanied by the capability of refilling the shock. In other words: If you don’t have a nitrogen source handy, don’t check the pressure

YAMAHA TTR 125 SHOCKS REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 08-01-2012

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1. With the bike unloaded on the side stand and the shock fully extended, have an assistant measure from a point at the axle (center point) to a point on the frame, fender or bodywork directly above it. Record this measurement. 2. With the bike off the stand and the rider in the seat, bounce on the suspension and let the bike settle. Have the assistant measure from the same two points. Subtract the second measurement from the first. 3. The amount of settle, or “sag” is a function of the wheel travel. It should only be between 1/4 and 1/3 of the total travel. 4. If the difference is less than the minimum, reduce the spring preload. Measure the distance again starting with Step 2. Adjust again if necessary. 5. If the difference is more than the maximum, increase the spring preload. Measure the distance again starting with Step 2. Adjust again if necessary. Note: If the ride height is too low, the shock will bottom unnecessarily, resulting in a harsh ride. If the ride height is too high, the shock will “top out” too easily when rebounding from a bump or under hard deceleration. NITROGEN PRESSURES IN EMULSION SHOCKS CAUTION: The pressure in these shocks cannot successfully be checked. Concerns with the gauge volume and the gas volume in the shock body create a situation where you cannot accurately determine what pressure was in the shock. In addition when the pressure is lowered (i.e. checking the pressure) the gas and some of the shock oil escapes into the gauge. It is possible to lose a large percentage of the shock oil by depressing the core of a charged shock to the atmosphere. Please note that in order to check the pressure, some of the gas must escape and fill the gauge assembly. The volume of the gas pocket is about half the size of your thumb, so a very small volume change results in a large pressure drop. Because the gauges’ volumes vary, it is not possible to deduce the actual pressure in the shock prior to attaching the gauge. Therefore it is imperative that any attempt to check pressure be accompanied by the capability of refilling the shock. In other words: If you don’t have a nitrogen source handy, don’t check the pressure

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HONDA 450E/ S MOUNTING AND ARS ADJUSTMENT INSTALLATION

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 24-12-2011

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MULTI-RATE SPRINGS AND THE ARS SYSTEM Depending on the application dual–rate springs are fitted on the shocks. Dual-rate springs are just that– a spring set with two separate rates. This is done with a short spring stacked on a longer spring. As both springs collapse they produce a soft, or initial, rate. The spring set will maintain this initial rate until the short spring stops compressing. At that point, the spring rate “crosses over” to the stiffer, or final, rate. This multi-rate system allows a soft initial rate for comfort on small bumps, but has the capability of soaking up the big pot-holes and other off road hazards. ARS stands for Adjustable Rate Suspension. ARS is available on some dual-rate spring 4-wheel ATV shocks. ARS differs from spring preload. The ARS system allows the rider to increase or decrease the load-carrying capacity of the shocks by turning a lever. Depending on the application and spring set, the rider can increase the load capacity of the shocks up to 50 percent. The average preloader that makes a half-inch increase in preload will HONDA 450E/S MOUNTING & ARS ADJUSTMENT INSTRUCTIONS Continued on next page. #TRX450 – 5/28/99 #TRX450 – 5/28/99 Fig. 1. Front shock installation. Note that the shock body is at the top with the shaft pointing down. ARS shown is in the unloaded position. Fig. 2. Rear shock mounting with ARS. Position the lever so that it will not come in contact with any vehicle parts around it. The cup can be rotated to reposition the lever if necessary.
increase the capacity of the shocks to only about 5 to 10 percent. ARS allows the shocks to be correct for solo riding, but still handle the increased weight of an added load. ARS can also be employed to stiffen the rates for aggressive riding. The ARS system consists of an indexing lever and a stepped cup that contains the short spring of the dual- rate. The position of the lever in relation to the steps in the cup determines how long the spring set remains on the soft, or initial, spring rate. On most ARS applications, four positions can be selected from full stiff to full soft. Indexing is done in a matter of seconds by rotating the lever or the cup by hand. Indexing the cup to the lever is usually preferable to avoid interference. Adjustment of the ARS system should only be made while the vehicle is unloaded to reduce the load on the springs. NOTE: It is important to make sure that a step in the cup is positioned directly over the tang on the lever. This will prevent damage to the cup and/or lever that can be caused by making partial contact between the tang and a step. In addition, make sure that the lever will not contact any vehicle parts around it, as the suspension moves up. TUNING TIPS—The “softest” setting on the ARS does not mean that the ride will be the most comfortable at that setting. It means that this is the softest spring setting which would be employed on smooth trails or without a load. Excessive suspension bottoming caused by rough conditions or by the addition of a large load will cause a harsh ride when the shock is adjusted to this setting. To eliminate this bottoming, adjust the ARS to the stiffer positions for a more comfortable ride. Hence, sometimes “stiffer is softer.” NITROGEN PRESSURES IN EMULSION SHOCKS

Honda ST 1300 Series Single Shock Supplement

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 13-02-2011

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Check the orientation of the adjuster on the shock body – looking at the top of the shock, the hydraulic line port should be165 degrees (clockwise) from the nitrogen pressure valve (see figure 2) . If it is not properly oriented, you will need to reposition it. To do this, hold the upper shock eye securely in a vice and carefully rotate the Remote Adjustable Pre-Load adjuster the desired direction. This may be somewhat difficult due to spring tension, and may require slight loosening of the locking ring. Also, the spring, shaft, and lower mount may rotate while repositioning the adjuster. This is OK, just be sure to realign it with the upper mount (also be sure the rebound adjuster on the lower mount is properly oriented as noted below). Mount the shock as you would your stock shock per your authorized shop manual (with the rebound adjustment at the bottom) noting the following: n As you mount the shock, feed the Remote Adjustable Pre-Load adjuster through the same path as the stock line was routed to the same location. n Do not loosen or attempt to rotate the line between the shock and the adjuster. n Make sure the shock rebound adjustment is facing the right side of the motorcycle and the pressure valve is facing up and towards the rear (figure 3) . n Tighten shock bolts to the proper torque specifications (refer to your manual). n Mount the adjuster to the supplied mounting bracket adapter using the supplied M6-1.0X8mm SHCS fasteners and torque them to 80- 90 in/lbs (9-10 N-m). Then mount the bracket and adjuster to the bike in the same location as the stock preload adjuster using the supplied M6-1.0X20mm SHCS fasteners & nuts, and torque them to 80-90 in/lbs (9-10 N-m) (figure 4 & 5) . n Using the supplied zip-ties, secure the hydraulic line away from any moving parts or heat sources.

MOUNTAIN BIKE AIR SHOCK SET-UP AND TUNING GUIDE

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 01-12-2010

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DETAILED SET-UP 2. Installing Air Pressure – Remove the air cap from the Schrader valve on the end of the shock body. Attach the pump to the Schrader valve. Some people damage their pumps by screwing them on too far. As soon as the gauge registers pressure, screw 1/2 turn more and pump to the desired level. Use the release button on the pump to reduce air pressure. The hiss you hear when unscrewing the pump is only the air from the pump and not from the shock! Likewise, when you install the pump again, you will also hear a hiss as air from the shock fills the pump and reduces the registered pressure you previously installed. All perfectly normal when pressurizing the shock! After removing the pump, be sure to reinstall the Schrader valve cap. If the shock does not dampen properly after pressurizing, the air pressure may have been lost during pump removal as a result of a worn pump fitting o-ring that needs replacement. Do not ride the bike until the shock is properly pressurized. 3. Main Air Spring Pressure Adjustments – Air Spring adjustments are made by inflating or deflating the main air spring chamber. Since your IFP air pressure adjustment (outlined above) also affects your starting spring force, you should always adjust your IFP pressure before adjusting the main air spring pressure. You can refer to the online Quick Start guide at: www.progressivesuspension.com/literature.html for accurate main air spring pressure and sag settings matched to your bike model and body

BMW K-SERIES (INCLUDING PARALEVER) SHOCK MOUNTING INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 16-11-2010

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1. The shock mounts with the hose towards the rear of the machine, with the shock body at the top and the shaft pointing downward. 2. Take the inside half of the bushing set on the shock eye (at the shaft end) and place it on the mounting post on the drive hub. 3. Insert the body eye into the mounting channel on the frame. In some cases the channel may have to be spread slightly to fit the bushing set. NOTE; Do not try to install the shock with only half of the bushings, as this will lead to poor performance and premature seal leakage. For the same reasons, do not grind or file the inner or outer edges of the bushings to make them narrower. The amount of “float” in the bushing set is necessary to ensure smooth operation of the damper assembly. 4. Slide the shaft end of the shock over the mounting post. If it does not easily align with the bushing in place, the eye (and shaft and spring, etc.) can be rotated to fit. 5. Install the outer shock eye bushing and follow with the washer and nut. Install the upper shock mounting bolt and nut finger tight. 6. Position the reservoir under the frame rail below the seat. It will fit neatly between– and inside– of the stock luggage rack mounts. Let the reservoir dangle and put the hose clamps loosely in position over the frame tube. NOTE: The reservoir should be mounted so that the hose has a slight curve in it. This will allow a certain amount of movement at the shock body without putting pressure on the hose fittings at the shock. 6. Position the reservoir inside the hose clamps with the rubber stand-off pads between the reservoir and the frame. The hose clamps should be fitted on either side of the Allen bolt that attaches the tail section to the frame. They can placed at any point along the O.D. of the reservoir, but about 1/2″ from each end is typical. The stand-off pads should be at the same location on the reservoir as the clamps. Tighten the clamps snugly. Do not over-tighten the clamps, as this can cause them to break during temperature extremes. 7. Sparingly apply a thread locking compound to the threads on the shock mounting fasteners and tighten them to 28 to 32 lbs/ft. Over-tightening the fasteners can damage the bushings and cause