Honda 400EX Hub installation instructions

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 20-12-2011

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Remove all contents from its packaging and verify that all parts are present and free from damage. You should have the following items: (2) wheel hubs (2) smaller tapered bearings (2) large tapered bearings (2) wheel bearing nuts (2) dust caps (2) inner bearing seals (6) M3 x .5 screws (2) cotter pins (2) inner bearing spacers 2. Completely remove the old hubs from your quad and clean the spindle and the surrounding areas. It is very important to keep the new bearings and seals clean during installation for long life. Be sure to remove the factory inner bearing spacers from the spindle and discard. They will not be used in re-assembly. 3. Pack your new Timken tapered wheel bearings with a liberal amount of high quality wheel bearing grease. A wheel bearing packer works best, however you can accomplish the task by placing the grease in the palm of your hand and manually working it in between the bearing rollers. We also recommend that you pack the area between the bearing races in the hub with grease for additional lubrication and protection against moisture. 4. Place the large wheel bearing (inner) into the hub and install the inner seal. The seal should bottom out against the step in the bore and the face should be flush with the hub. 5. Remove the brake rotors from your old hubs. Re-install the rotors on your new hubs and be sure to use medium strength Loctite on the threads. 6. Apply a light film of grease or oil to the large diameter of the spindle stud. Install the new o-ringed bearing spacer onto the spindle. 7. Apply a thin film of grease to the seal surface on the bearing spacer and the inside diameter of the seal to prevent the seal from running dry. Install the hub onto the spindle and slide the outer bearing over the spindle and install the new bearing nut furnished with your hubs. Do not use the factory nut or washer. 8. SETTING THE BEARING PRELOAD: It is first necessary to seat the bearing before setting the preload. This aligns the rollers and prevents the bearings from loosening after a short period of use. To seat the bearing, tighten the spindle nut while you rotate the hub until the hub becomes difficult to spin. With the bearing now seated, you must set the bearing preload. Preload means placing a small amount of force against the bearings to remove any clearance between the bearing race and the rollers. This is done by backing the nut off completely and re-tightening it with your fingers. Do not rotate the hub while setting the preload . If a hole in the spindle is not accessible for installation of the cotter pin, adjust the nut tighter to bring a hole into alignment. Install the cotter pin and bend the pin around the outside of the nut. Do not attempt to bend the pin toward you (over the end of the spindle) or it may rub on the inside of the dust cap.

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1928 AJS Installation Instruction Manual

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Filed Under (AJS) by admin on 31-10-2010

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Oil delivered at “6″ goes to the big end, while that delivered at “5″ goes up to the cam box. The bottom end of the plunger also has a slot, which registers alternately with inlet ” 7 ” and outlet ” 8,” and is responsible for returning the oil from the sump to the tank. It is of greater capacity than the supply pump. To dismantle the pump, proceed as follows :— 1. Remove all pipes from the pump. 2. Remove pump from engine. 3. Remove the two nuts “A” and the pin” 3 ” from the pump. 4. Gently push the plunger out of the pump body in the direction of the arrow “C” on the drawing. To re-assemble, the reverse sequence of these operations is, of course, followed. Should it be required to remove the worm ” 2,” the brass bush ” D ” which screws into the body with a R.H. thread, must be removed first. It is of the utmost importance that the nut “A” always makes an air-tight joint with the body ; and should there be no oil returning to the tank at any time, check this joint immediately. Occasionally go over all the oil pipe unions and nuts to see that everything is tight. Should one of the unions come loose, especially on the inlet side of the pump, of course, the whole system of lubrication fails. As will be seen from the illustration, the oil pump itself is very simple. There are only two moving parts, and it is most unlikely that anything in this pump will get out of order. Should the oil not be circulating and running back to the tank, be quite sure that there is plenty of oil in the tank and that the filters are clean, before dismantling the pump. Should it be necessary to take the oil pump from the engine, make certain that the short piece of square tube which drives the pump spindle from the engine is replaced. The pump delivers oil to the big end via holes drilled down the driving side of the crank­ case, then through holes in the main shaft, up web of flywheel, and through the crank pin into the big end. Oil is also taken to the cam box. A portion of the cam box projects inside the chaincase—the end of this projection is open ; the oil from the cam box falls on to the vertical chain—from there it falls through holes in the crankcase into the sump, and is returned to the oil tank. The piston and little end of connecting rod are lubricated in the ordinary way by splash from the big end, but we have found it necessary for continued high speeds on track or in road race, above (say) 60 m.p.h. average, to take an extra supply of oil direct to the cylinder walls

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