Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Upgrading the Suspension on the Kawasaki ER6-F/ N

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Filed Under (Kawasaki) by admin on 30-11-2010

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Top fork is as removed. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Before removing the fork from the clamps on the yokes I loosened the fork top. Before removing the fork top the fork-slider was placed in a vice and the bottom bolt loosened….. … before finally being removed with the fork upside down. Because the springs were still in situ this gave sufficient tension on the damper-rod to prevent it from turning and allow the bolt to be removed. When I turned the fork the right-way up to remove the fork-top I did it over a container to catch the oil. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource All the OE components that will no longer be required. Left to right. Fork-top, spacer tube, washer, spring, damper-rod. Bottom bolts get re-used. Old and new, laid-out for comparison. The damper unit, minus spring and fork-top, drops inside the stanchion and slider. Kawasaki Ninja 650R (ER-6F) & ER-6N Resource Then the bolt goes back in, as tight as possible, to secure it. Top fork is done, second one awaits. Note the spring seat on the right, just below the spring. This drops over the damping rod after the oil has been added. The small locking-nut screws over the threaded part of the damping-rod next, all the way to the bottom. Spring drops in and then the fork-top screws on to the damping-rod as well, all the way down to the lock-nut which is used to secure it. At this point the stanchion is extended to the fork-top which is screwed in. Job done.

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AJS Fork Seal and Top Bush Removal Repair/ Service Procedure

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Filed Under (AJS) by admin on 31-10-2010

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For those of you, like me (writes old Tom, of the doughty Bristol Section), who have to dismantle the front forks, and have got to the stage when the seals and bush have to be removed… Here the workshop manual states that a swift jerk or upward movement of the stanchion should shock out the seal and bush. It is more likely that nothing happens! I have always managed to remove the seals and bush by the following method: Obtain one block of wood 3″ x 3″ or 4″ x 3″ and 5″ long. Drill a hole 1 1/8″ or 1 ¼” and then saw the wood in half along the centre line of the hole. Glue in two pieces of emery cloth to aid grip on your stanchion. Place into a vice with a dummy tube of the right diameter (same as your fork leg) and leave for the glue to set the emery cloth into place. Then obtain two pieces of hardwood or 1″ ply, 8″ x 6″ and drill 1 1/8″ or 1 ¼” hole in centre. Also obtain a piece of hardwood 1ft x 6″ x 1″ and cut to form two wedges as shown in the drawing. To use the withdrawal jig, place the two large blocks over the inner stanchion to butt against the lower stanchion. Now fit the two halves of the split block inner stanchion. Clamp the split blocks in a vice while a colleague tensions the rebound spring. The wedges are now placed between the larger blocks and the lower stanchions, which is heated to aid removal. Drive in the wedges to push the lower stanchion away from the fixed inner stanchion

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