BMW R1100 – R850R Maintenance Guide

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 27-11-2010

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R1100 Checklist – Carl Kulow • Check alternator belt (replace 36K miles) • Adjust valves • Spark plugs (replace 12K) • Air filter (replace 12K) • Lube and adjust clutch cable • Lube front shock lower mount • Lube side and center stand • Check brake fluid (replace yearly) • Check brake pads • Check battery acid level • Fuel filter (replace 24K) • Throttle body sync • Oil and filter (replace 6K) • Check transmission fluid level (replace 12K) • Check rear wheel drive fluid level (replace 12K) • Check tires and pressure • Check all nuts and bolts • Check all air and oil hose clamps • Check all lights PARTS – TOOLS Tools Parts Misc. sockets spark plugs compressed air wrenches oil filter anti seize torque wrench air filter carb cleaner hex sockets brake pads rag hex wrenches oil – 4 qt. BMW #10 grease feeler gauges gear oil – 1 1/4 qt. flexible tubing oil filter tool alternator belt (tygon) flashlight fuel filter, o-ring, clamps measuring cylinder crush washers Mityvac -3 small = trans.drain, rear drive fill and drain digital volt meter -1 medium = oil drain heat gun -1 large = trans.fill tire change tools 5 R1100 Maintenance Steps – Carl Kulow Note: This overview section serves only as a step by step reminder for experienced workers. If you are unfamiliar with any procedure you should read the parenthetical reference article or Paul Glaves’ Routine R1100 Service Article! Note to R1100RT and R1100RS Riders: remove the side panels as described in your owners manual “Service and Technical Booklet” except RT: instead of pulling the mirror off as the manual says, you need to hold the back of the mirror (front of bike) with one hand while you hit the front outside corner of the mirror with the palm of your hand thus knocking the mirror off. Check Alternator Belt remove four bolts holding black plastic cover(4mm hex), remove cover, check belt for cracks etc., check belt tension, replace belt every 36K miles, leave cover off for valve adjustment (see Jon Diaz “Alternator Belt Adjustment”)

BMW R850, R1100, R1150, R1200 Oilhead Maintenance Manual

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Filed Under (BMW) by admin on 16-11-2010

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cold Engine and Drivetrain Procedures Check Alternator Belt Tools Parts T-handle hex – 4mm none Note: In most cases the alternator belt does not need to be checked any more. Early models should have the pulley and belt upgrade that came out a few years ago. Current recommendations are that the belt is installed and adjusted, then not disturbed until 36K when replacement is specified. 1. Remove the four bolts holding the black plastic alternator belt cover at the front of the engine, 4mm T-handle hex. 2. Remove the cover by sliding it straight down. 3. Check the belt for cracks or shredding. 4. Check the belt tension, quite tight, ~1/4″ deflection when you press on the center. Note: Paul Glaves suggests that proper belt tension is when you can twist the belt ~90 degrees, midway between the pulleys. If you can twist it more than 90 degrees, it is too loose. If you cannot twist it 90 degrees, then it is too tight. 5. Leave the cover off for the valve adjustment procedure on the next page. Change Alternator Belt Tools Parts T-handle hex – 4mm alternator belt socket – 13mm ratchet wrench – 13mm torque wrench 1. Remove the four bolts holding the black plastic alternator belt cover at the front of the engine, 4mm T-handle hex. 2. Remove the cover by sliding it straight down. 3. Loosen the 2 nuts and 1 bolt, 13mm, that hold the alternator – one is on top and one is on each side, thus allowing the alternator to pivot down. 4. Remove the old belt. (Some bikes have a pipe that traps the belt – loosen it enough to get the old belt out and the new belt in) 5. Install the new belt being sure it is properly seated. 6. BMW calls for a tensioning torque of 5.9 ft.lb. (8 Nm) on the adjuster bolt on the left side of the bike. You have to get at this bolt from the alternator side and you may have to lift the tank. Alternatively, you can pry the alternator up with a large screwdriver to tension the belt. 7. Once the belt is under proper tension, tighten the 2 nuts and 1 bolt, 13mm, to 15 ft.lb. (20 Nm). 8. Check the belt for proper tension (see above) and proper seating alignment

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Aprilia Falco Synchronizing the Cylinder Vacuum

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Filed Under (Aprilia) by admin on 26-10-2010

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Motorcycle cylinders work quite independently compared to automobiles. Separate carburation, intake manifolds, exhaust pipes and sometimes even independent air filters allow the cylinders to be tuned so that one may be making more power than another. This can be due to differences in air flow, temperature, injection, or valve adjustment betwen the cylinders. Periodically, the cylinders should be synchronized. This is usually done by comparing intake manifold vacuum beneath each throttle and trimming the mixture until balanced. Some old-timers will tell you it can be done by ear, listening to the air flow in each carb throat through a tube stuck in your ear. Most modern tuners have switched to mercury sticks. Rigid tubes stuck in a bath of mercury are attached to the vacuum source. The vacuum draws the mercury up the sticks in proportion to pressure difference between the manifold and the atmosphere. In order to smooth out the individual vacuum pulses, a damping device is needed. This is nothing more than a small orifice (pin hole) restriction in the lines, placed close to the manifold with an air reservoir (length of tube) behind it. Because there is no real air flow in the gauges, there is no pressure drop across the orifice. But when the manifold vacuum drops there is a delay before the gauge pressure can bleed off and it appears steady and readable. Other types of vacuum gauges include mercury-less versions (that draw metal rods), or traditional needle, or “clock” gauges. The clock gauges are very fast acting (they are designed that way so you can see engine problems such as sticking valves). You will definitely need a damper if you choose a clock gauge. I would recommend using two side by side gauges for checking cylinder synch. The reason is, the cylinders are not perfectly independent. As one cylinder drops strength, the idle drops, and this will change the vacuum in the second cylinder’s manifold. It takes a bit of fooling around to get a cause-and-effect feel when you are turning the screws. Swapping gauges would make this difficult

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