MPS Sport Bike Auto Shift Installation Manuals

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Filed Under (Suzuki) by admin on 21-02-2012

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The first thing to do is remove the seat, fuel tank, and possibly the front fairing if equipped. You will need plenty of room to work. Electrical Connections – You will need to locate and test a few things on your bike before you start wiring. A good ground, an ignition switched 12 volt power source, the horns, and the ignition coils. We have plug n play style harnesses available for some bikes. Check the web site for specific models. Control Box Wiring Coils – Most four cylinder motorcycles use either a individual firing system or a waste spark system. Waste spark is by far the most common. All four cylinder bikes with only two coils use a waste spark system. Most late model four cylinder sport bikes use waste spark systems even though they have four individual coils. Bikes with a waste spark systems will need the 360 calibrated unit. The 360 calibrated Sport Bike Autoshifts are identified by the 360 engraved into the box below the wire lead exit. The P/N for these boxes has the 360 as a suffix. (P/N 1-0299-360) Some of the newest fuel injected bikes (Hayabusa, GSXR1000, ZX12) that have cam sync sensors are individual firing. These bikes will require 720 calibration and will have no outside identifiers and the P/N 1-0299. The Sport Bike Auto Shift has four brown wire leads that are connected to the negative of each individual coil on a four coil system. You will notice that the connector for the four brown wires has a molded in ridge that marks the brown wire that is used as the rpm sensor. This must be connected to the number one cylinder coil negative wire.

MPS Electronic Engine Kill Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 27-10-2010

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blue wire should be connected to the normally open pole of the shift button. The Shift Button is a momentary type switch. The common pole of the shift button should be connected to a good ground and the normally open connects to the blue wire from the Electronic Engine Kill box. Electric Air Valve – The Electric Air Valve has two wires. These wires are interchangeable. One needs an ignition switched 12 volt power source. The other needs a ground signal when the shift button is depressed. The easiest way to do this is to locate the red and blue wires in the Electronic Engine Kill wire harness. Splice one Electric Air Valve wire into the red wire and splice the other Electric Air Valve wire into the blue. Once again soldering is the preferred method but you can use schotchlok splices. Setting Kill Time – Kill time is the amount of time the engine stays dead between gears during a shift. Generally the shorter the kill time the quicker the shift. The proper kill time will vary from bike to bike. Its generally better to start with to much kill time and work your way quicker. We generally start at around 75 ms. of kill time. The Kill Time is adjusted via a small potentiometer accessed through the grommet on the front of the unit. Using a small screwdriver Carefully turn the pot clockwise to the end of its travel. This is 100 ms of kill time. Now, carefully turn the pot screw counterclockwise to the end of its travel. This is 50 ms of kill time. Halfway in between is 75 ms. The pot only goes from 7 oclock to 5 oclock so don’t force it, they break easily! Testing The System – With no air in the system start the bike. Bring the rpm up to around 3000 rpm and push the shift button. You should hear a slight hesitation in the engine each time you depress the shift button. Once you establish that you have a engine kill when pushing the shift button remove the clevis pin from the shift cylinder and extend the shaft to the end of its travel. Air up the shifter to 120 psi. We also have onboard compressor kits available to conveniently fill the air tank on the fly or high pressure CO2 systems that can shift hundreds of times without refilling. With the engine off and the key on push the shift button