CONDOR PIT-STOP / TRAILER-STOP USER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 27-11-2010

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Assembly Illustration: Step1: Using parts C, attach the Base Back to the Main Unit. (3/16 allen wrench required, torque between 16 – 18 ft-lbs) Step2: Swing into position the front stop containing the CONDOR logo. Step3: Place Pin F through Main Unit and front stop bracket. The pin may be tight at first use, push it through using light force and twisting it in. (Attach Hair Pin Cotter H once the pin has passed all the way through) Step4: Place cradle as shown in the desired setting and insert Pin E through Main unit and cradle pipe. (Attach Hair Pin Cotter G once the pin has passed all the way through) User Instructions: Confirm that the cradle is set in the optimized position setting for the entering tire and wheel. Adjustment of cradle is crucial for optimum retention. Optimum retention is achieved by trying different settings. Place unit in front of or behind motorcycle. Push or drive motorcycle centered into unit until the cradle of the Pit-Stop has fully engaged the wheel. Once the wheel is cradled, proceed to push further into the Pit- Stop until the wheel has engaged the front stop. If the optimum vertical support is achieved, the motorcycle will hold itself upright. If optimum retention is not achieved try different cradle settings. As an extra precaution, use the Velcro strap to strap the cradled wheel to the front stop. Always strap Velcro through the wheel and around the front stop below the upper front stop flange

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DST-1200 WHEEL BALANCER INSTALLATION AND OPERATION MANUAL

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 27-11-2010

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1. Remove the carton from the pallet. 2. Remove the shipping bolts making sure to keep hands clear of all pinch points. 3. Remove straps and plastic wrap holding the hood and tower in shipping position. z Do not use the control tower, face-plate, hood or threaded shaft to lift the balancer. z Use help to remove the balancer from the pallet. The unit is heavy and the weight is not evenly distributed. z Dropping the unit from the pallet may cause personal injury or equipment damage. Electrical Requirements YOUR MACHINE HAS A DUAL VOLTAGE MOTOR and can be run on either 110 or 220 volts. STANDARD WIRING IS 110 VOLTS. Your balancer features a dual voltage, (110/220volt) dual phase (50 or 60 HZ.) power system. Simply position the switch located at the back of the machine to the desired voltage setting then install a required plug if necessary

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How to Replacing Rear Main Seal 1

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 24-11-2010

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The next day I woke up early and drank lots of coffee before going out to the garage. I knew I had two distinct problems confronting me. First, I would have to purchase an impact tool in order to loosen the six bolts holding the clutch together. Also, I would have to purchase at least three 8mm by 50mm bolts and nuts in order to prevent the clutch from exploding when the six bolts were unscrewed. For the third time in two days, I went to Sears and asked the salesman, (who I now I knew as Art,) where I could find an impact tool. He did not know what it was I was looking for, but he asked another employee and soon I had the tool as well as a 6mm Allen socket. Unfortunately, the Allen socket only came in 3/8″ drive, and the impact tool only came in 1/2″ drive. Thinking quickly, I purchased a 1/2″ to 3/8″ adapter, as well as a 3lb. dead- blow hammer. On the way home, I stopped at a Chief Auto Parts to buy the bolts I would need. The closest size they had were 8mm by 40mm, which was nearly 10mm too short. I was unsure whether the clutch cover bolts were coarse thread or fine thread, so I bought three of each, along with corresponding nuts. Finally, around 11 o’clock in the morning, I was back at the garage ready to work. I prepared the impact tool and placed the adapter and the Allen socket on it. I began to hammer on the end of the tool, trying to loosen each of the six bolts. None of them seemed to move, even though it seemed the impact tool was turning. Finally, I put the Allen socket on the breaker bar and found that all of the bolts had actually come loose. The tension from the clutch spring made it nearly impossible to see, however. I removed three of the bolts in a triangular pattern. Into these empty holes I threaded the fine- thread 40mm bolts with nuts attached and tightened them evenly. I was now able to remove the remaining Allen bolts. By slowly turning and loosening the nuts evenly on the 40mm bolts, I relieved the pressure from the clutch spring until the cover plate was free. I removed the cover plate, the clutch, the pressure plate, and finally the clutch spring. I had already marked each of the elements with Whiteout to insure that they would fit together the same way on installation. Apparently, this is essential as the flywheel could be rendered out-of-balance if the clutch components are not installed correctly. The flywheel itself was now exposed. I could see the five bolts that attached it to the crankshaft. I now used a tool I had fabricated. Although the manual describes two possible tools that can be fabricated, I found a piece of metal that resembled the tool and decided to use it. Unfortunately it was not strong enough and broke. I turned and looked at my workbench, and noticed a bracket which I had previously fabricated for mounting a mirror on my Vespa. The piece of steel was extremely strong and was already pre-drilled with correct-sized holes. It fit perfectly, so I placed it over the exposed bolt which protruded from the case, and placed the other end on one of the 40mm bolts, which I then bolted into the flywheel itself. I used the breaker bar again and removed the five bolts. The flywheel came loose after inserting two more 40mm bolts and tugging on them evenly

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Motorcycle stand Wheel chock set up and operating instructions

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Filed Under (Tips and Review) by admin on 22-11-2010

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1. can be adjusted to fit the wheel length. The Motorcycle Stand will fit most standard motorcycles currently on the market. However, some models with especially wide tires or custom low-profile front fenders will not fit. Mount the Support Arm (4) to the front of the Base using 2 Bolts (12), Washers 2. (5), and Nuts (6). Insert Pin (9) through the mounting holes and Cradle Stop (3); secure with Wash- 3. er (10) and R Pin (11). Insert Pin (9) through the mounting holes and Wheel Adapter (2); secure with 4. Washer (10) and R Pin (11). Securely tighten all hardware before use. 5. the Motorcycle stand must be mounted securely before use. 6. Page 5 SKU 97841 For technical questions, please call 1-800-444-3353. Mounting in concrete Choose a location to install the Motorcycle Stand that is flat, level, and capable of 1. bearing the combined weight of the Motorcycle Stand and the motorcycle being secured. The location should not obstruct walkways and provide enough room to retrieve the motorcycle after it is mounted. The surface of the location should be one suitable for the mounting of heavy equipment. Use the mounting holes in the Base (1) of the Stand as a template. Arrange the 2. Base in the chosen location and mark where the holes are to be drilled. You will need concrete anchors (not included) to secure the Base to the concrete 3. floor. Using the correct size concrete drill bit (not included), drill the mounting holes to secure the Base. Attach the concrete anchors to the floor. Secure the Base to the floor using con- 4. crete anchors.

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2004 Vengeance MOTORCYCLE OWNERS MANUAL

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Filed Under (Vengeance) by admin on 21-11-2010

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Vengeance Warrior • Vengeance Raider • Vengeance Vertebreaker • Vengeance Striker • Vengeance Vendetta • Vengeance Vindicator Shifting Gears Starting off and changing gears requires coordination of the clutch and throttle and gearshift lever. If you don’t do things right, the amount of control you have over the bike is lessened. To start off, pull in the clutch, shift into first gear, roll on the throttle a little, and ease out the clutch. You will become familiar with the friction zone (that’s where the clutch begins to take hold and move the bike), and you add a bit more throttle. You don’t want to stall the engine, nor do you want to over-rev it. There’s a sweet spot in there; find it. Shift while traveling in a straight line. Shifting in a curve is not good practice, and something to be avoided. Become familiar with the sound of your engine, so you can tell when you should shift without looking at your instruments. When you downshift to a lower gear, you should (in one swift, smooth movement) be able to squeeze the clutch, rev the engine a little to let it catch the lower gear smoothly, and shift down. When you come to a stop in traffic, leave the bike in first gear with the clutch disengaged (just in case you want to accelerate out of there in a hurry). Who knows what may be coming up behind you. Braking Don’t ever forget: The front brake on your motorcycle can supply as much as 70 percent or more of your stopping power. The single most important thing you can learn about braking is to use that front brake every single time you want to slow down. Always apply both the front and the rear brakes at the same time. If necessary, apply them hard, but not so hard that you lock up either wheel. A locked wheel, as well as causing the bike to skid, results in downright inefficient braking. Turning When you are riding along the road, you lean a motorcycle into a turn. Learning to lean is an essential part of riding a motorcycle. It is a normal function of the bike when you are changing its path of travel – and quite different from turning the steering wheel of your car. To get the motorcycle to lean in a normal turn, press the handlebar in the direction of the turn and maintain slight pressure on that handlebar to take you smoothly through that particular turn. In other words: press right to go right; press left to go left. Your instincts to keep the motorcycle on a smooth path while keeping it from falling over usually take care of this without you even noticing it. (Demonstrate to yourself how a motorcycle moves by pressing a handlebar slightly while traveling in a straight line. The motorcycle will move in the direction of the handlebar you pushed.)

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AJS NAC12 Specifications

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Filed Under (AJS) by admin on 12-11-2010

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Engine type ………………….. 4 stroke, twin cylinder, liquid cooled Cylinder capacity …………… 124cc Bore x stroke ………………… 44mm x 40mm (x2) Starting method ……………. Electric Transmission ………………… 5 speed gearbox, Chain drive. Clutch ………………………….. Wet, Multi-plate Ignition ……………………….. Coil CDI Battery ………………………… 12v Tyres F <> R ………………… Tubeless 90/90 – 18 <> 130/90 – 15 Suspension F / R …………… Tele’ forks / twin rear shocks Brakes F / R …………………. Twin disc / disc Fuel tank capacity …………. 18 litres Seat height …………………… 77cm (30.5″) Wheel base …………………… 151cm Max power net (approx) …. 8.5kw @ 10’500 rev/min Dry weight …………………… 153kg Max load ………………………. 150kg Noise Level (drive by) …….. 77db(A)

Express ATVS -250cc Cobra Setup/ Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Cobra) by admin on 10-11-2010

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Unpacking your Cobra Installing the front shock Installing the front tires Installing rear shocks Installing the rear tires Installing seats and harnesses Steering wheel installation Roll cage installation Safety checks / Adjustments General maintenance Unpacking your Cobra First off you should pull the carton off from your new 250 Cobra cart. Inspect the cart thoroughly to make sure that your new Cobra has not been heavily damaged. You will notice that the product has a metal frame holding it in place; you may want to start removing bolts from the shipping steel frame. The next step is to remove the metal frame and lift it off of the cart. Remove any of the metal frame that may afford resistance when working on the cart it self. Be careful the metal frame may be heavy and sharp. Now would also be a good time to inspect your Cobra a little more thoroughly. In the box with the Cobra you should have found a box containing miscellaneous hardware. Installing the front shock Using some of the bolts you found in your box, install the front shocks sliding the bolt through the brackets and tighten the nut down. Next, you will need to place the ball head into the turning arm, then tighten the castle nut and insert a cotter pin so that the castle nut doesn’t loosen and become a hazard. Installing the front tires
Find the front tires and place them on the front hub and place the lug nuts on the studs. Tighten them down. Make sure that all of the lug nuts are on tightly. Installing the rear shocks Moving to the rear of the Cobra you will notice the rear shocks are not inserted. Place the rear shocks into the bracket on the rear of the Cobra. Slide one of the provided bolts through the bracket and shock eyelet and tighten the bolt down. Installing the rear tires Now that the shocks have been placed properly you can install the rear tires, place the tires onto the axle then place the rear rim lined up onto the axle and tighten the provided castle nut down. Place the cotter pin through the axle and bend off to the side. This is so the castle nut does not loosen under load. Installing the seats and harnesses
(The arrow points to an example of where the seat bolts mount) Find the two racing seats shipped in the box with the Cobra. You will need to affix them to the frame by sliding the bolts up through the bottom of the frame. This can be tricky so have patience. Once both seats have been placed in the cart and tightened find the harnesses. Once found the harnesses mount to a bracket behind the seats. Place a bolt through the bracket and bolt the harnesses down tightly. Installing the steering wheel Find the steering wheel and place it onto the steering wheel mount. Grab the six small screws and place them through the steering wheel and mount, tighten them down but also make sure the top of the wheel is facing up. Installing the roll cage

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CUSTOM LED 2004-2006 YAMAHA ROAD STAR INTEGRATED TAIL KIT INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 10-11-2010

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1 ) REMOVE THE SCREWS ON THE BACK SIDE OF THE TAIL LIGHT THAT HOLD THE CHROME TRIM TO THE TAIL LIGHT. 2 ) POSITION YOUR CUTTING WHEEL AS SHOWN IN THE PICTURE TO THE LEFT WHERE THE CLEAR PART OF THE LENS TURNS 90 DEGREES. THE CUTTING WHEEL SHALL REMAIN IN THE PLANE OF THE LENS. 3 ) PROCEED TO CUT INTO THE CLEAR LENS APPROXIMATELY HALF OF THE THICKNESS, ALL THE WAY AROUND THE PERIMETER OF THE LENS – BE SURE NOT TO CUT ALL THE WAY THROUGH BECAUSE IT WILL NOT GLUE BACK TOGETHER PROPERLY. SEE “TIPS FOR CUTTING YOUR LENS” BEFORE BEGINNING. TIPS FOR CUTTING YOUR LENS A) KEEP THE CUTTING WHEEL MOVING AND APPLY LIGHT PRESSURE. SITTING IN ONE SPOT WILL JUST MELT THE PLASTIC. WHEN YOU MAKE YOUR WAY AROUND THE ENTIRE PERIMETER, CLEAN ALL THE BURRED PLASTIC FROM AROUND THE EDGES AND FROM INSIDE THE GROOVE YOU’VE MADE. OPENING THE LENS 4 ) PLACE THE TIP OF A FLAT HEAD SCREWDRIVER IN THE GROOVE YOU HAVE CREATED. 5 ) GENTLY TWIST THE SCREWDRIVER TO CRACK THE GLUE ALONG THE GROOVE. NOTE: AS SOON AS YOU HEAR THE SOUND OF THE GLUE GIVING (A CRACK), MOVE THE SCREWDRIVER SLIGHTLY AND ADVANCE THE CRACK. SLOW AND STEADY IS THE NAME OF THE GAME HERE. IF YOU FIND A HARD SPOT, WEAKEN IT WITH THE CUTTING WHEEL AS NECESSARY. THE HARD PART IS OVER! YOU CAN RELAX NOW! 2 ©2005 Custom LED LLC. All Rights Reserved. 6 ) REMOVE THE SCREWS HOLDING THE STOCK LED BOARDS TO THE HOUSING (YOU WILL BE REUSING SOME OF THE SCREWS SO PUT THEM TO THE SIDE). 7 ) REMOVE THE STOCK LED ASSEMBLY FROM THE LENS HOUSING. YOU WILL NO LONGER NEED THE STOCK LED BOARD, DISPOSE OF IT AS YOU WISH. 8 ) GENTLY PRY OFF THE PLASTIC COVER TO EXPOSE THE DRIVER BOARD UNDERNEATH. 9 ) REMOVE THE SCREWS SUPPORTING THE DRIVER BOARD AND SNIP OFF THE THREE WIRES (BLUE, BLACK, YELLOW) AS SHOWN AS CLOSE TO THE CIRCUIT BOARD AS POSSIBLE! YOU WILL NEED TO CONNECT TO THESE WIRES LATER. 10 ) POP OUT THE LITTLE BLACK PLUG AS SHOWN IN THE PICTURE. YOU CAN POKE IT OUT FROM THE INSIDE OF THE HOUSING. WIRING UP YOUR CUSTOM LED BOARD PLACE YOUR CUSTOM LED INTEGRATED TAIL BOARD NEXT TO THE HOUSING AND MATCH THE WIRE COLORS AS FOLLOWS: TRY TO HANDLE THE CIRCUIT BOARD AS LITTLE AS POSSIBLE AS FINGERPRINTS AND DIRT WILL HINDER THE PERFORMANCE. • BLACK ON HARNESS TO 6″ BLACK ON CUSTOM LED BOARD • BLUE ON HARNESS TO 6″ BLUE ON CUSTOM LED BOARD • YELLOW ON HARNESS TO 6″ YELLOW ON CUSTOM LED BOARD USE THE THREE (3 OF 5) SUPPLIED ORANGE SPLICE CONNECTORS. PUSH THE TWO WIRES TO BE SPLICED TOGETHER INTO THE OPEN END. BE SURE TO PUSH THE WIRES ALL THE WAY IN (UNTIL YOU CAN SEE THEY HAVE REACHED THE OTHER SIDE). NOTE: YOU WILL NEED TO SEPARATE THE THREE WIRES FIRST BY CUTTING THE PLASTIC COLLAR THAT BINDS THEM. FOR THE WIRES TO FIT PROPERLY INTO THE CONNECTORS, YOU MUST ALSO REMOVE THE REMNANTS OF THE COLLAR FROM THE WIRES. NOTE: THE SPLICE IS MORE RELIABLE IF THE WIRE IS NOT STRIPPED. BE SURE TO SNIP OFF THE BARE ENDS OF THE WIRES ON THE CUSTOM LED TAIL TO ENSURE THAT THERE IS INSULATION WHERE THE SPLICE WILL OCCUR. THE SUPPLIED SPLICE CONNECTORS AUTOMATICALLY DISPLACE THE INSULATION AS NECESSARY. ONCE YOU DOUBLE CHECK YOUR COLOR MATCHING AND ARE ABSOLUTELY SURE THAT THE WIRES ARE FULLY INSERTED INTO THE SPLICE CONNECTORS DO THE FOLLOWING: 11 ) SQUEEZE THE SPLICE CONNECTORS FIRMLY WITH PLIERS. VISUALLY INSPECT YOUR CONNECTIONS TO SEE THAT THEY HAVE BEEN SPLICED PROPERLY INSIDE. 12 ) RUN THE GREEN AND BROWN WIRES THROUGH THE HOLE YOU OPENED UP IN STEP 9

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HONDA VT-600 Front Wheel Adapter kit Installation Instructions

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Filed Under (Honda) by admin on 10-11-2010

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1. Using a 6mm Allen wrench, loosen the 2 front axle pinch bolts on the right side of the lower fork leg. Loosen bolts 4 or 5 turns. 2. Using a 17mm Allen wrench, slightly loosen the front axle from the right side of the bike. Having the front wheel on the ground will help you in loosening the axle. Do not remove the axle at this time! 3. Loosen and remove the speedometer cable from the back of the speedometer on your handlebars. Pull the speedometer cable all the way out of the front fork. Remove the cable from the speedometer drive on your front wheel (note the position of the connection as it will be similar on your new drive installation). This speedometer cable or speedometer drive will not be needed on your new wheel installation. 4. Block the back wheel to prevent the bike from rolling backwards, and raise the motorcycle’s front wheel off of the ground, so the wheel spins freely. You can do this with a motorcycle lift placed under the front portion of the motorcycle frame. Contact Scootworks to purchase a lift if you don’t have access to one. Ensure the bike is stable and will not fall before proceeding further! Scootworks, Inc. 3 5. Using the 17mm Allen wrench, finish loosening the front axle until it is completely free from the left side of the lower fork. Hold onto the front wheel and slowly remove the axle from the front fork. Be careful not to let the wheel drop. Having a helper hold the wheel for you as you remove the axle will ease the removal. Slide the brake rotor out of the calipers. NOTE: be careful not to operate the front brake controls with the brake rotor removed from the calipers. 6. With the wheel removed from the front forks, lay the wheel on a padded or cushioned surface with the brake rotor facing upwards. Using a 6mm Allen wrench, remove the 5 Allen bolts from the brake rotor. (The bolts are sometimes installed with loctite, and may require heating with a small torch to loosen the loctite). Remove the brake rotor from the wheel. Place the wheel to the side. Clean up the bolts as you will reuse them later. 7. Take your new custom wheel that you will be installing on your bike and place it on a cushioned or padded surface to prevent scratching. Turn it so that the side where the brake rotor attaches is facing upward. 8. Ensure the brake rotor mounting holes on the wheel are clean and free of oil or grease. Clean with alcohol if needed, then let dry. Place your new brake rotor adapter plate onto the wheel with the flat side against the wheel. Apply a small amount of medium strength (blue) loctite on each of the 5/16″ Allen bolts supplied with your kit and install through the new rotor adapter plate and into the wheel. Tighten with a 3/16″ Allen wrench until snug. When all bolts are installed, tighten in a star pattern, and torque to 25-30 ft. lbs. 9. Install your brake rotor onto the new brake rotor adapter using the original bolts you removed in step 6. Apply a small amount of medium strength loctite to each bolt and install through the brake rotor into the new brake rotor adapter. Tighten in a star pattern, and torque to 25-30 ft. lbs. 10. It is now time to install your new wheel/rotor adapter onto your bike. It is easiest to accomplish this with a helper, as it takes some coordination to get the wheel, brake rotor and spacers into place. Apply a thin coat of grease to the axle. Lift the front wheel into place between the front forks, aligning the brake rotor into the caliper. The caliper floats from left to right and can be moved into the proper position. If the caliper is closed, pry the brake pads apart so that the rotor will slide into the caliper.

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Yamaha V-Star 650 Engine Guard Installation Manual

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Filed Under (Yamaha) by admin on 08-11-2010

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1. Protect the rear portion of the front fender with a towel or other thick, soft cloth. Remove the OEM engine guards if they have been installed on the motorcycle. Your new Barons engine guard will fasten to the frame at the same points as the OEM guard and will use the same hardware. 2. Or, if OEM engine guards are not present, remove the 14mm bolts from the underside of the drivers footpeg mounts. 3. Remove the 12mm upper engine mount bolts located on both sides of the frame. Replacement bolts are included with your new engine guard. 4. Position the engine guard so that the lower brackets point towards the rear of the motorcycle, and slide the engine guard into the space between the front wheel and the frame. 5. Raise the guard until the holes in the lower mounting brackets align with the vacated bolt holes beneath the drivers footpegs. Due to production line tolerances in both the motorcycle and the engine guard, the mounting brackets may be too wide or too narrow for the frame. If this is the case, remove the guard from the motorcycle. Place the guard on a flat, firm surface. Insert a towel or other protective material between the guard and the surface. Using a rubber mallet or a block of wood and a hammer, tap the lower brackets until they are correctly spaced. 6. Insert the large washers (supplied with the guard) between the rear face of the lower bracket and the frame. The washer fills the space between the lower mounting bracket and the footpeg mount. Reinsert the 14mm bolts and finger tighten. 7. Rotate the guard until the holes in the upper mounting brackets align with the empty holes on each side of the frame. 8. Insert the replacement 13mm bolts, along with their washers, and tighten securely. Tighten all other nuts and bolts securely. 9. Remove the protection on the front fender and you’re ready to ride. CAUTION!!! You must re-tighten all four of the engine guard mounting bolts after 100 miles of riding! Care & Cleaning: Engine guards take the full brunt of the worst of what the weather in your area has to offer, making it critical that proper and complete cleaning take place on a weekly basis, or corrosion will occur which is not covered by warranty! Proper cleaning procedure would be to use a product like Simple Green, LOC, Salt-Away or similar. Mix a strong batch and apply it liberally with a soft towel or soft nylon brush to the entire

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